View Full Version : I don't know what to do


Sillyputty14
11-05-16, 12:24 AM
Hi everyone,

I'm sorry if this gets covered a lot but I'm super lost. I'm in my mid 20's and have explained some of the issues I'm having with my SO and she suggested that I should get an evaluation for ADHD. I have thought about this in the past but I don't like going to the doctor or taking any medication really so I have avoided it. I have minimum health coverage but I don't know how to get started or if it even covers it. And what it would cost if I paid out of pocket. I know some people said you have to take a lot expensive tests and I honestly can't even get close to paying for it if I need to. Not worried about taking the actual tests lol. I also don't want to refuse it (because I can't afford it) and the doctor think I'm faking. I feel like this is more complicated than it should be but it gets me all jumbled up. I also feel a bit weird about going in at my age. I know it's not supposed to be something to be embarrassed about but I can't help that I am.

What should I do? See a family doctor? How would I start talking to a professional (like schedule an appointment even)?

Thanks for any and all help.

-SP

namazu
11-05-16, 12:43 AM
Hi, and welcome to ADDF.

You shouldn't need extensive testing to get evaluated for ADHD -- which is good, because it's expensive (~$1000-$3000) and often not covered by insurance. That type of testing is usually only needed if there's a suspicion of brain injury or some other type of processing disorder involved. Some colleges still demand documentation of testing for students requesting academic accommodations. But regular diagnosis and treatment of ADHD don't require this testing.

You can see a family doctor or a psychiatrist or psychologist. Psychologists cannot prescribe medication, but family doctors and psychiatrists can. The advantage of a psychiatrist over a family doctor is generally that they have more experience with psych medications and diagnosis and treatment of psych disorders than a general family doctor does. However, knowledge, experience, and bedside manner will depend a lot on the specific doctors, and some family doctors are pretty knowledgeable (and there are some dinosaurs among psychiatrists), so inquire about experience with ADHD.

If you have a family doctor already, that may be a good place to start. It should be billed like a regular office visit.

If you see a psychologist or psychiatrist, the initial appointment may be billed at a higher rate because they will want to spend more time with you taking a history. Check your coverage and insurance provider directory to see whether there are covered psychologists or psychiatrists in your area.

An evaluation for ADHD in adults should consist of a thorough history (medical, family, developmental, educational, social, occupational...) and some discussion of your current difficulties and symptoms and how they affect your life. The doctor may also ask you (and possibly others who know you well, like your SO) to fill out rating scales to describe the problems you encounter in daily life, or may want to talk to your SO (with your permission). If you happen to have old records from schools, jobs, or any history of financial or legal or relationship trouble related to your symptoms, those may be useful.

Basically, they're trying to determine a) whether you meet the symptom criteria for ADHD, b) whether those symptoms have caused and continue to cause meaningful impairment in multiple areas of your life, c) whether you've had a lifelong history of ADHD symptoms, and d) whether there may be another explanation for your difficulties, or other problems that may coexist with ADHD.

So my suggestion would be to set up an appointment to talk to your family doctor or a psychiatrist by calling their office (and checking that they still accept your insurance), and go from there.

Best wishes!

FogNoggin
11-05-16, 01:10 AM
I used the Canadian (un)Employment Insurance system to get my evaluation and diagnoses. All at no cost to me. It was my plan 4 years ago, as I started acting up and getting in trouble at work, 5 years, they were nice to me and "laid me off", the nicest way to get fired.
Tell them you have a problem keeping a job, and your personal barriers that prevent gainful employment and that you have a history of problems from childhood.
Just tell them you need help, and want to do better.

And when you do become unemployed again, they are easier on you, even if you quit your job because of 'issues', you've been diagnosed with a recognised mental disorder that impedes your life in the job market, getting, keeping and rising in a job.

Seems after 3 years with a certain job, i got to get out! 5 years I had that job before my diagnoses, and I started losing it, hard to look for another job when you work 40-50 hours a week, I start feeling trapped.

Anyway, i don't know what country you are from, but get whatever free help you can get.

sarahsweets
11-05-16, 09:48 AM
Those tests are very expensive and unnecessary and of little benefit for the standard adhd'r. Someone makes out real well because of how much those tests are....hmmm.

FogNoggin
11-05-16, 02:49 PM
Yes, over paid people in some fields fails to benefit those most in need.

Almost like old ladies having to euthanise their cats because they can't afford the vet bills, vets, the biggest scammer gougers in history.

At least effective flea treatment has been deregulated and no longer behind the vets desk.


Yeah, go the free route if you can at all costs. (<---read that carefully :cool: )

Little Missy
11-05-16, 04:14 PM
Yes, over paid people in some fields fails to benefit those most in need.

Almost like old ladies having to euthanise their cats because they can't afford the vet bills, vets, the biggest scammer gougers in history.

At least effective flea treatment has been deregulated and no longer behind the vets desk.


Yeah, go the free route if you can at all costs. (<---read that carefully :cool: )

You could ruin a free lunch. Are you having a bad life?:)

Pilgrim
11-05-16, 06:42 PM
I used the Canadian (un)Employment Insurance system to get my evaluation and diagnoses. All at no cost to me. It was my plan 4 years ago, as I started acting up and getting in trouble at work, 5 years, they were nice to me and "laid me off", the nicest way to get fired.
Tell them you have a problem keeping a job, and your personal barriers that prevent gainful employment and that you have a history of problems from childhood.
Just tell them you need help, and want to do better.

And when you do become unemployed again, they are easier on you, even if you quit your job because of 'issues', you've been diagnosed with a recognised mental disorder that impedes your life in the job market, getting, keeping and rising in a job.

Seems after 3 years with a certain job, i got to get out! 5 years I had that job before my diagnoses, and I started losing it, hard to look for another job when you work 40-50 hours a week, I start feeling trapped.

Anyway, i don't know what country you are from, but get whatever free help you can get.

Im not sure if your referring to your medical system or unemployment system.

I've been thinking about going to our unemployment system and getting coverage, problem is I don't really know if I'm impaired enough. And them actually accepting it is another issue.

Staying in the workforce is a priority doing this would be a safety issue.

dvdnvwls
11-05-16, 07:10 PM
Canada vs Australia may have different ways people are expected to find assistance, though it comes out to more or less the same stuff in the end.

Tetrahedra
11-05-16, 08:30 PM
Hello! I'm around your age and I'm just now getting into the diagnostic thing. I'll tell you a few things about my experience:

- While your GP is a good place to start, it's possible he might not know a whole lot about ADHD or may even dissuade you from pursuing it. It's worth a shot to talk to him, though. Just keep in mind that if he doesn't think that you have ADHD doesn't mean that you don't, and it would be best to get a second opinion with someone who specializes in it.

- If you're not pursuing medications or accommodations, you can always go to a therapist who's familiar with ADHD. There's also ADHD coaching. Normally therapists are a little less expensive than a doctor. Higher degrees means higher pay. That said, if you're interested in visiting a psychologist or psychiatrist, that's perfectly fine, too.

- If you're having trouble financially, it's okay to let the doctor know. Sometimes doctors will give you options that are more cost effective if there are other options.

- You're never too old to be diagnosed with ADHD, or just about anything for that matter. There are some people here on this forum who were diagnosed well into adulthood--forties, fifties, etc. It's your life and if whatever is going on is bothering you, get it taken care of sooner rather than later.

Swissy
11-06-16, 07:49 AM
I saw a neurologist. Whoever you choose, confirm they have experience evaluating adults for ADD.