View Full Version : ADD and depression meds experience


john2100
11-09-16, 09:35 PM
Having both ADD and depression , I think when I look back at my life,that depression is much,much worse for me then ADD.

When I have a good day , it is when my depression is lifted for 1-2 weeks every 3month. Then I can control my ADD better ,even without meds.

When I was on adderal for ADD and with deep depression (no meds) ,I felt little better on adderal ,but after 2 yrs it was just not working for depression or ADD that much.

I can control my ADD life without meds ( somewhat ), but I can't control depression.

What happened to you when you went on antidepressent?
How much change have you noticed in your life and is it still working?

Thank you.

Little Missy
11-09-16, 09:40 PM
I did the worst things, made the most awful decisions, was completely irresponsible and they ruined my life.

I cannot ever take anti-depressants again.

I actually loved the very, very old anti-depressant tricyclic, Tofranil.

Now, for others they may be a great help. :)

Aladin
11-09-16, 11:52 PM
Having both ADD and depression , I think when I look back at my life,that depression is much,much worse for me then ADD.

When I have a good day , it is when my depression is lifted for 1-2 weeks every 3month. Then I can control my ADD better ,even without meds.

When I was on adderal for ADD and with deep depression (no meds) ,I felt little better on adderal ,but after 2 yrs it was just not working for depression or ADD that much.

I can control my ADD life without meds ( somewhat ), but I can't control depression.

What happened to you when you went on antidepressent?
How much change have you noticed in your life and is it still working?

Thank you.

Hey,

I have try several antidepressants so I can tell you. The problem is, this kind of meds are not like an aspirin, that produces the same effect on almost everyone. A given AD can do wonder for a given individual and absolutely nothing for another individual (who could, as a bonus, suffers from really annoying side effects). I write all this because I don't know if you're familiar with AD or not so I assume you are not. Maybe you know all that.

If you never tried any AD, you doc will probably prescribe you a SSRI, since they are the first-line treatment. They are all supposed to work in a similar way (by increasing the serotonin levels in some areas of your brain) but while one may work for you, another may not, so it's not uncommon to try several before finding the right one. It's trial and error.

So how is like to take an SSRI ? The first few weeks (let's say 2-6 weeks), you probably won't feel any improvement, since this kind of med don't work immediately. You may actually feel a little worse due to the side effects (ex: slightly worsen anxiety, dry mouth, increased sweating, modified intestinal transit, tiderness...). Then, not all of a sudden, but progressively, if this med works for you, you'll start feeling a little better. The negative thoughts will be a little less frequent and the anxiety a little less strong. Negative events will affect you a little less, you'll be a little less sensible. Don't expect a miracle, but over the course of months, you'll continue to improve. After six months, if the treatment was the right one, you'll see that there has been a significant change and that life is more enjoyable. What can be good is to use the boost given by the med to work on yourself (CBT or other stuffs that can help), to maximize the benefits.

So good luck. Finding the good med can be easy for some, hard for others. It can takes time. Even if a med works, you'll have to find the right dose. Also you should be aware that SSRIs often have sexual side effects, that can be quite bothersome at high doses... And don't interrupt your treatment "cold turkey" if you have been on it for quite some time. Do it under supervision of a doctor, as there can be withdrawals.

Cyllya
11-10-16, 03:02 AM
Yeah, I had bad problems with depression. Fortunately the first antidepressant I tried worked just about perfectly; it seems most people aren't that lucky.

I originally started taking sertraline about six years ago, and I've been taking it without breaks for the last four years. It's still works. It seems like SSRIs usually do work long-term, rather than having the tolerance problems that stimulants often have.

Alas, the withdrawal effects are likely to be worse and/or longer lasting than stimulants. Maybe the regular side effects too.

If one of your ADHD problems is initiation impairment (that weird urge to not do things), depression could definitely make that worse. I hear of depression causing attention problems too, but I didn't really notice that.

aeon
11-10-16, 04:01 AM
Every SSRI/SNRI I have ever taken produced side-effects that ranged from distressing to functionally disabling, with no effect whatsoever on my mood.

Bupropion hydrochloride/Wellbutrin works a treat for me, however.

And certainly, Dexedrine, although not an antidepressant in the classic sense, is the most potent and efficacious mood brightener I have ever known.


Cheers,
Ian

stef
11-10-16, 04:59 AM
I was prescribed antidepressants once, by a GP
they worked quickly and for about 48 hours i was free of anxiety
but then they turned me into a complete zombie
I just dont think I needed them, i dont think I had the chemical inbalance they are designed to fix, in the first place (not sure if this is right vocabulary, sorry)

But, I know they work wonders for people. Really they saved my mom's life.

Aladin
11-10-16, 12:19 PM
Every SSRI/SNRI I have ever taken produced side-effects that ranged from distressing to functionally disabling, with no effect whatsoever on my mood.

Bupropion hydrochloride/Wellbutrin works a treat for me, however.

And certainly, Dexedrine, although not an antidepressant in the classic sense, is the most potent and efficacious mood brightener I have ever known.


Cheers,
Ian

Well it seems to indicate that your low mood is due to dopamine dysfunction rather than serotonin imbalance.

SSRIs/SNRIs don't work so well on me but at least I get very few side effects.

ToneTone
11-10-16, 02:01 PM
Depression undermines everything--literally. So no surprise that you feel you can cope with ADHD but not cope well with depression.

I'm curious: why haven't you gotten treated for depression? Any good psychiatrist would hear your reports on your mood and recommend treatment for the depression. But you may be going to a general practictioner like a buddy of mine who gets ADHD meds but should also get depression meds. Occasionally, he just collapses in bed for days at a time. Then he rights himself ...

I have had 30 years of depression treatment with therapy, including Cognitive Behavior Therapy ... and about 12 years ago I started depression treatment with Zoloft, which worked but caused my partner at the time to complain of sexual side effects. The psychiatrist switched me to bupropion and bam! Immediately had I had energy and focus ... Later we increased the dose and I'm still on bupropion (Wellbutrin).

For a lucky few, Wellbutrin helps with ADHD and I was one of those few, so I noticed that the med wasn't simply counteracting depression but increasing my ability to focus and plan. That's what led me ultimately to get diagnosed for ADHD.

Sounds like you're aware of your depression pattern. Do you have a doctor you trust that you can talk to about trying out treatment.

Before taking bupropion I was either recovering from a depression (severe or even mild), anticipating a depressive mood, trying to stave off a depressive mood. In other words, even when I wasn't deeply depressed, depression preoccupied my life. Wellbutrin really shifted me out of that morass. For that, I am so grateful.

Good luck.

Tone

Aladin
11-10-16, 02:10 PM
Depression undermines everything--literally. So no surprise that you feel you can cope with ADHD but not cope well with depression.

I'm curious: why haven't you gotten treated for depression? Any good psychiatrist would hear your reports on your mood and recommend treatment for the depression. But you may be going to a general practictioner like a buddy of mine who gets ADHD meds but should also get depression meds. Occasionally, he just collapses in bed for days at a time. Then he rights himself ...

I have had 30 years of depression treatment with therapy, including Cognitive Behavior Therapy ... and about 12 years ago I started depression treatment with Zoloft, which worked but caused my partner at the time to complain of sexual side effects. The psychiatrist switched me to bupropion and bam! Immediately had I had energy and focus ... Later we increased the dose and I'm still on bupropion (Wellbutrin).

For a lucky few, Wellbutrin helps with ADHD and I was one of those few, so I noticed that the med wasn't simply counteracting depression but increasing my ability to focus and plan. That's what led me ultimately to get diagnosed for ADHD.

Sounds like you're aware of your depression pattern. Do you have a doctor you trust that you can talk to about trying out treatment.

Before taking bupropion I was either recovering from a depression (severe or even mild), anticipating a depressive mood, trying to stave off a depressive mood. In other words, even when I wasn't deeply depressed, depression preoccupied my life. Wellbutrin really shifted me out of that morass. For that, I am so grateful.

Good luck.

Tone


I envy you. I would like to try welbutrin but here it's only prescribed to quite smoking... I will still ask my psychiatrist if I can try it off label.

john2100
11-10-16, 02:33 PM
Depression undermines everything--literally. So no surprise that you feel you can cope with ADHD but not cope well with depression.

I'm curious: why haven't you gotten treated for depression? Any good psychiatrist would hear your reports on your mood and recommend treatment for the depression. But you may be going to a general practictioner like a buddy of mine who gets ADHD meds but should also get depression meds. Occasionally, he just collapses in bed for days at a time. Then he rights himself ...

I have had 30 years of depression treatment with therapy, including Cognitive Behavior Therapy ... and about 12 years ago I started depression treatment with Zoloft, which worked but caused my partner at the time to complain of sexual side effects. The psychiatrist switched me to bupropion and bam! Immediately had I had energy and focus ... Later we increased the dose and I'm still on bupropion (Wellbutrin).

For a lucky few, Wellbutrin helps with ADHD and I was one of those few, so I noticed that the med wasn't simply counteracting depression but increasing my ability to focus and plan. That's what led me ultimately to get diagnosed for ADHD.

Sounds like you're aware of your depression pattern. Do you have a doctor you trust that you can talk to about trying out treatment.

Before taking bupropion I was either recovering from a depression (severe or even mild), anticipating a depressive mood, trying to stave off a depressive mood. In other words, even when I wasn't deeply depressed, depression preoccupied my life. Wellbutrin really shifted me out of that morass. For that, I am so grateful.

Good luck.

Tone

I 'm scarred to go on ssri,one reason is, sexual side effects. A small % say, that even after they were of SSRI for a long time, the bad sexual side effects continued. So I might end up with depression and bad long term s.effects.With my luck i'll be in that group for sure.

Cognitive therapy for depression:what is it really? Do they tell you how to cope with situations? Some positive reinforcement ,some practical stuff ?
I ' ve read so many books about success,achievements ,psychology,positive thinking , but nothing can get rid of my depression .It just lifts for no reason for 1-2 weeks (every 3month )and then it is gone overnight.

I'm not sure why I was never treated for depression . Even as a kid, I felt the sadness and desperation most of the time, for no apparent reason.

I think I have just realized it recently (2 yrs back) that I have depression too.
My add meds were helping with depression a bit, so I didn't care for antidepressent. I was on add meds for 2-3 yrs maybe.

Maybe I just didn't care that I'm depressed ( because of was depressed ) so I dint seem to care for a treatment.

Aladin
11-10-16, 04:21 PM
I 'm scarred to go on ssri,one reason is, sexual side effects. A small % say, that even after they were of SSRI for a long time, the bad sexual side effects continued. So I might end up with depression and bad long term s.effects.With my luck i'll be in that group for sure.

Cognitive therapy for depression:what is it really? Do they tell you how to cope with situations? Some positive reinforcement ,some practical stuff ?
I ' ve read so many books about success,achievements ,psychology,positive thinking , but nothing can get rid of my depression .It just lifts for no reason for 1-2 weeks (every 3month )and then it is gone overnight.

I'm not sure why I was never treated for depression . Even as a kid, I felt the sadness and desperation most of the time, for no apparent reason.

I think I have just realized it recently (2 yrs back) that I have depression too.
My add meds were helping with depression a bit, so I didn't care for antidepressent. I was on add meds for 2-3 yrs maybe.

Maybe I just didn't care that I'm depressed ( because of was depressed ) so I dint seem to care for a treatment.


Nah don't worry about permanent sexual side effects... It's really the problem of internet nowadays, people read some stuff and then worry about things that are so so so unlikely. You have a greater chance to be killed by a falling tree by the end of the week than to get permanent sexual side effects from an SSRI. It is very very exceptional. It has never been observed in a study to my knowledge, because it is so rare. Some people may need a little time to get back to normal after stopping, but even that is pretty rare. Really, there are reasons not to want to take an SSRI but this one should not be one of them. Some people don't even have sexual side effects, or very little... I have been on a lot of SSRIs and I experienced sexual side effects on some of them. Usually the worst is during the first few weeks and then it gets better. And each time, a few days after stopping, all was back to normal. You may want to talk with your doctor about that, so he doesn't prescribe you a SSRI that is more likely to have this kind of side effects (like paroxetine, which is the worst in that regard). If you have a bad experience with one SSRI, you just switch to another, no problem.

I too have been sad for most of my life... I realized I was depressed when I was 18.

Books can be good, but a therapy is better because first it will give you some relief to talk, even if you don't think so, and also because depression is partly due to some bad thought patterns that you do not necessarily manage to spot by yourself. CBT is supposed to help you changing these patterns. Of course there is no miracle and the outcome depends a lot on the skills of the therapist (that is why it is better to try a few before starting a therapy), but it can be useful.

Good luck !

john2100
11-11-16, 01:17 AM
"Books can be good, but a therapy is better because first it will give you some relief to talk, even if you don't think so, and also because depression is partly due to some bad thought patterns that you do not necessarily manage to spot by yourself. CBT is supposed to help you changing these patterns. Of course there is no miracle and the outcome depends a lot on the skills of the therapist (that is why it is better to try a few before starting a therapy), but it can be useful."

I just don't see how it could possibly help.
If you have low serotonin or dopamin,there is nothing you can do to lift your mood permanently . You may learn to cope little bit , but for me it looks like waste of time.

It's like watching a good inspirational movie. You feel good watching it, but the minute it ends, you are feeling miserable again. That's how I see a therapy for depression.

BellaVita
11-11-16, 03:42 AM
I've been on 3 or 4 antidepressants, 2 of them long-term. (Okay I think Trazodone is technically an antidepressant - but it was for sleep so I don't count that)

I also wonder if for me they just didn't target the right brain chemicals/receptors/brain areas. (Umm, I'm like stef - I don't know proper terms,and I'm sleepy)

Zoloft turned me into a zombie and I still felt depressed anyway, even on different doses.

Lexapro had unpleasant side-effects, and made me mentally "not sharp", and didn't really help my depression. I couldn't even tolerate 10mg of it because of the horrible side-effects, had to cut it in half and take 5mg.

I feel like both SSRIs made my brain function on a worse level. I remember after I quit Lexapro I realized just how mentally dull it had made me, and how much faster my brain worked without it. It was like a fog lifted.

I wish they would've worked for me. I do hope different ADs come out in the future that are effective for me.

That said, I've seen people who became happier and more themselves once they took ADs, and it has been a very helpful thing for many.

ToneTone
11-11-16, 01:51 PM
CBT doesn't work for everyone ... and neither do antidepressants. But both are worth a try (with good providers of course) ....

On how CBT could possibly affect the brain, I will link here to Eric Kandel, who won a Nobel Prize in physiology and medicine and who researches all kinds of brain issues ... Here's the money line:"psychotherapy is a biological treatment, a brain therapy. It produces lasting, detectable physical changes in our brain, much as learning does."

Now clearly he's talking about highly effective psychotherapy--as many people have emphasized here. Here's the link for Kandel's 2013 New York Times article.
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/08/opinion/sunday/the-new-science-of-mind.html

It IS confusing to accept that thinking can affect the brain. But it's widely accepted these days that learning and education affect the brain ... and habits affect the brain, not just "the mind" but the physical brain ... There is research coming out finding that people with more education suffer lower rates of dementia and a later onset of dementia.

Analogy: a friend sees you on the street and comes up behind and startles you. Your heart races, the emergency system goes into gear, fight or flight. Then your friend steps in front of you and you recognize their face and you think, "Oh, it's Johnny, being silly. I'm safe." Fight and flight system deactivates, and you calm down.

Well, events happen in life, a boss criticizes us ... a lover dumps us ... and our fight and flight mechanism can kick in ... along with a lot of thinking along the lines of "I'm so messed up. My life is over." ... Well,

CBT is about catching yourself in that moment of hopelessness and despair and asking, "is this really true that my life is over?"Or "is it really true that no woman/man in the world can ever love me?" Yes in the moment I FEEL my life is over, but under CBT training you learn to double-check those thoughts and see if there are earlier rejections you survived. And lo and behold, there are often a large number of experiences we can call up that contradict our prediction (that's what it is-really a prediction) that our life is over.

The trick is this: you have to find genuinely convincing evidence that contrasts your current sense of hopelessness. It can't be pollyannaish and superficial or fakely positive. You have to actually feel and connect with the contradictory evidence to whatever horrible conclusion you're drawing.

Switching up, my understanding is that the "chemical imbalance" view of depression is in decline. The low serotonin hypothesis is definitely under attack.

The evolving consensus seems to be that the SSRI's work but not because depressed people's brains are "chemically out of balance." They don't really know why the SSRI's work, from what I can tell. I take Wellbutrin and I've seen it mentioned many times that researchers don't really know how it works to combat depression.

So there's a lot of mystery in all of this ... we're just beginning to really understand the brain.

http://www.everydayhealth.com/columns/therese-borchard-sanity-break/is-the-link-between-serotonin-and-depression-a-myth/

http://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2014/09/13/low-serotonin-levels-dont-cause-depression/http://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2014/09/13/low-serotonin-levels-dont-cause-depression/


Tone

Aladin
11-11-16, 03:38 PM
CBT doesn't work for everyone ... and neither do antidepressants. But both are worth a try (with good providers of course) ....

On how CBT could possibly affect the brain, I will link here to Eric Kandel, who won a Nobel Prize in physiology and medicine and who researches all kinds of brain issues ... Here's the money line:"psychotherapy is a biological treatment, a brain therapy. It produces lasting, detectable physical changes in our brain, much as learning does."

Now clearly he's talking about highly effective psychotherapy--as many people have emphasized here. Here's the link for Kandel's 2013 New York Times article.
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/08/opinion/sunday/the-new-science-of-mind.html

It IS confusing to accept that thinking can affect the brain. But it's widely accepted these days that learning and education affect the brain ... and habits affect the brain, not just "the mind" but the physical brain ... There is research coming out finding that people with more education suffer lower rates of dementia and a later onset of dementia.

Analogy: a friend sees you on the street and comes up behind and startles you. Your heart races, the emergency system goes into gear, fight or flight. Then your friend steps in front of you and you recognize their face and you think, "Oh, it's Johnny, being silly. I'm safe." Fight and flight system deactivates, and you calm down.

Well, events happen in life, a boss criticizes us ... a lover dumps us ... and our fight and flight mechanism can kick in ... along with a lot of thinking along the lines of "I'm so messed up. My life is over." ... Well,

CBT is about catching yourself in that moment of hopelessness and despair and asking, "is this really true that my life is over?"Or "is it really true that no woman/man in the world can ever love me?" Yes in the moment I FEEL my life is over, but under CBT training you learn to double-check those thoughts and see if there are earlier rejections you survived. And lo and behold, there are often a large number of experiences we can call up that contradict our prediction (that's what it is-really a prediction) that our life is over.

The trick is this: you have to find genuinely convincing evidence that contrasts your current sense of hopelessness. It can't be pollyannaish and superficial or fakely positive. You have to actually feel and connect with the contradictory evidence to whatever horrible conclusion you're drawing.

Switching up, my understanding is that the "chemical imbalance" view of depression is in decline. The low serotonin hypothesis is definitely under attack.

The evolving consensus seems to be that the SSRI's work but not because depressed people's brains are "chemically out of balance." They don't really know why the SSRI's work, from what I can tell. I take Wellbutrin and I've seen it mentioned many times that researchers don't really know how it works to combat depression.

So there's a lot of mystery in all of this ... we're just beginning to really understand the brain.

http://www.everydayhealth.com/columns/therese-borchard-sanity-break/is-the-link-between-serotonin-and-depression-a-myth/

http://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2014/09/13/low-serotonin-levels-dont-cause-depression/http://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2014/09/13/low-serotonin-levels-dont-cause-depression/


Tone


Well that's pretty much what I was about to write, so you saved me time, good answer. It is really too simplistic to assume that depression is only due to a lack of serotonin and that only an antidepressant can have an impact on it.

john2100
11-11-16, 06:46 PM
Thanks great info about CBT, if I only had to power to implement it.

When I'm depressed I don't care about solving my depression.
I just know ,how miserable I am.
When my depression lifts, that is that moment when I want to be proactive and be ready when it comes back. I have a week or two for it. I have always a plan when I'm not depressed which is actionable, possibly similar to CBT advice.

The plan fails in implementation as soon as the depression is back.
It just overrides my energy and will to such extent ,that anything that requires any mental effort can't be implemented.(like cbt)

Like Mike Tyson have said. "Everybody has a plan ,until they get punched in the mouth."
That is my analogy for depression,once it hits me all the plans are pointless.

What works a bit is let say a good survival movie.
During watching it ,I feel better and motivated , as soon as it ends ,I'm back to the starting point.

Aladin
11-12-16, 12:46 PM
Thanks great info about CBT, if I only had to power to implement it.

When I'm depressed I don't care about solving my depression.
I just know ,how miserable I am.
When my depression lifts, that is that moment when I want to be proactive and be ready when it comes back. I have a week or two for it. I have always a plan when I'm not depressed which is actionable, possibly similar to CBT advice.

The plan fails in implementation as soon as the depression is back.
It just overrides my energy and will to such extent ,that anything that requires any mental effort can't be implemented.(like cbt)

Like Mike Tyson have said. "Everybody has a plan ,until they get punched in the mouth."
That is my analogy for depression,once it hits me all the plans are pointless.

What works a bit is let say a good survival movie.
During watching it ,I feel better and motivated , as soon as it ends ,I'm back to the starting point.

Yeah seeing a good movie is like being in another world where your problems do not exist :) I can't watch movies when I am really depressed though, it's too hard too concentrate.

It's the point of antidepressants: to give you the relief/boost you need to start working on your recovery.

There are a lot of options out here, so don't stay in that state, see a doctor ! There are SSRIs, SSRNs, tricyclic, MAOIs, atypical antidepressants, etc...

It' seems that MAOIs (an old class of AD) are among the most efficient but their side effects tend to be nastier than those of SSRIs.

I'm sure you can find something that will help you !

ToneTone
11-13-16, 01:07 AM
John2100,

Sure you can do this ... Just to make sure we are on the same page: doing CBT when one is depressed is not something one decides to do tomorrow. It's a skill and habit that one gradually builds ... like lifting heavier weights.

And that's what the therapy meetings about all: about practicing the techniques to sort through why you're feeling so bad ... or see if there is a thought that is pulling you down or actions you can take that will pull you up ... This isn't something you on your own.

I worry you're quickly thinking "I can't do x." Well ... until people start jogging around the block, they can't jog around the block. You slowly build up this skill.

I'd bet money that there are times that you did something for yourself, something that required energy, even though you felt really bad at the time.

Anyway, this is something one slowly builds up ... with the guidance and encouragement of a good therapist. And there are still times when I wallow in my mood rather than examine other ways of thinking ... So no one does it perfectly.

Tone

john2100
11-13-16, 10:16 AM
Thanks, I may give it a try. But it will require so much effort.

Pilgrim
11-13-16, 12:56 PM
Thanks, I may give it a try. But it will require so much effort.

I find what enhances depression is that giving into that state of hopelessness. Trust me I'm not saying it's easy to just brush it away. Looking for those habbits and routines that give the mind comfort. I've been battling this a bit lately and if it's not anxiety it's a mind halting depression. Exercise, eat well, watch the company you keep, be content in your own skin. And always remember good things will happen.

john2100
11-19-16, 03:03 PM
If depression is genetic disorders or there is something physically wrong with you ,maybe some abnormalities in your brain , could we say that in this case CBT will not be effective?

If deprss. is caused by psychological problems, it would makes sense that it can be solved by psychological approach.

How could we test it? Some chemical imbalance and chemical regulation test?

sarahsweets
11-20-16, 07:07 AM
Untreated bipolar for me was by far more dangerous and devastating then the adhd.

Aladin
11-20-16, 12:06 PM
If depression is genetic disorders or there is something physically wrong with you ,maybe some abnormalities in your brain , could we say that in this case CBT will not be effective?

If deprss. is caused by psychological problems, it would makes sense that it can be solved by psychological approach.

How could we test it? Some chemical imbalance and chemical regulation test?

To this date there is no test. And no this kind of logic doesn't really make sense since you have now way to know that your problems only have a biological origin. In any case you must not see things in a too simplistic way: it's not psychology on one side and "chemical regulation" on the other. They affect each other. As ToneTone already said to you on this thread, CBT are believed to affect the brain. So even if they may not have a miraculous effect, they can still improve your condition.

Anyway you do what you want if you are not willing to try a CBT then nobody will force you :) But do not assume that there is any scientific argument that supports your hypothesis. I know that when you feel depressed you tend not to believe that the way you were conditioned and your way of thinking do matter but it probably do.

In all case if you want to get better you should really consider doing therapy and/or taking meds, because if you do nothing I don't really see how things could improve. Don't thinking to much and act ! You have nothing to lose and a lot to gain.

Good Evening.

Cyllya
11-20-16, 06:27 PM
If depression is genetic disorders or there is something physically wrong with you ,maybe some abnormalities in your brain , could we say that in this case CBT will not be effective?

If deprss. is caused by psychological problems, it would makes sense that it can be solved by psychological approach.

How could we test it? Some chemical imbalance and chemical regulation test?

In my case, the symptoms of the psychiatric depression actually caused the kind of cognitive distortions that CBT is good for treating.

I was able to fix the problem (I think!) without therapy, but it involved things that were pretty similar to CBT techniques.

Alas, there's no test for physiological depression. (And hypothetically, if you tested positive for that, it might just be that you have both problems, like I did.) I think the causes are still poorly understood, and there's probably multiple causes anyway. I think the "low serotonin" theory has been debunked. They used to think that was the problem just because raising serotonin (or inhibiting reuptake) helps, but apparently that's not the case.

john2100
11-20-16, 08:08 PM
I was able to fix the problem (I think!) without therapy, but it involved things that were pretty similar to CBT techniques.

Can you elaborate on it little bit? Some examples?thanks

julialouise
11-21-16, 05:43 PM
Every SSRI/SNRI I have ever taken produced side-effects that ranged from distressing to functionally disabling, with no effect whatsoever on my mood.

Bupropion hydrochloride/Wellbutrin works a treat for me, however.

And certainly, Dexedrine, although not an antidepressant in the classic sense, is the most potent and efficacious mood brightener I have ever known.


Cheers,
Ian

yep

i took Viibryd (20mg in winter, 10mg in summer) for the majority of the past 2.5 or 3 years (shortly after i turned 18, i'm 21 now) with a short experience with Cymbalta (30mg? i dont remeber)

honestly, im not sure if the viibryd ever really helped. i think at best, it acted with a type of placebo effect for me, because i still experienced periods of bad depression (often during the school year). i was constantly behind on work for all my classes. i learned that, when i'm taking 3 classes, i am able to put 50% of my effort into one of the important ones, 50% into the other one, and 0.099% into the other one (dramatization). so even if i managed to stay afloat in one class, it meant the others suffered.

i got a D in drawing AND a D in painting because i just couldnt get stuff done on time. i LOVE art, so both of those situations took a big toll on my emotional state. i remember being WEEKS behind in a spanish class freshman year. and cramming books, always and forever. i didnt know why this was all happening though (but when i read about ADHD i cried with relief)

i took cymbalta one summer because the Vii was too expensive, and i have no idea why, but there was something about it that i really hated. maybe i was just being prejudicial about it, or maybe my brain was working subconsciously to get me off it lol.

im on 300mg Wellbutrin XL (generic) right now and my mood is 100x better. i used to smoke to raise my dopamine levels in a self-medicating way when i was still on viibryd, but now, my craving/impulses to smoke are at the lowest levels theyve been at (comparable to the time before i ever smoked!)

i still have issues with executive functioning, and procrastinating, and being able to focus on something that needs to get done (unless its due TOMORROW), but i have been better at pushing myself (work for at least 20 minutes, take a break, so on) so it hasn't been too bad. i do get irritable more easily, which i really dont like, but i've always been prone, and my stimming/hyperactivity is just the same (hair twirling, foot/leg shaking, biting insides of my mouth - i try to substitute it with gum whenever i can, it's usually worse when i'm focusing).

but with wellbutrin i've been a lot more optimistic and hopeful and i feel much more driven to get past all my difficulties and succeed!!!! i never felt that way on viibryd (i remember having a breakdown thinking about how organized and on-time you have to be as a teacher and how it feels like i'll NEVER be able to do that. now, i just know its going to be hard but it IS POSSIBLE)

and it makes me more willing to try CBT-type techniques and hopeful that it'll work (on viibryd i thought it would be a lost cause so i never tried it)

oh, and SSRI's KILLED my sex drive. its still not really here, but that could be my birth control. but there are glimpses of hope!