View Full Version : Just feel like giving up--an overview


ExitMyReality88
12-30-16, 09:25 PM
I understand that only a licensed clinician can diagnosed me, and what I have written here is what I am going to send to my therapist via online messaging. I was wondering if you all could tell me if I am missing any pertinent information or anything I need to shorten/would be better to explain in person. I find it much easier to write rather then speak to a provider because it gives me time to collect my thoughts.

I came across an article very recently regarding ADD-PI. Even with majoring in psychology (currently pursuing a 2nd bachelors in neuroscience) I always assumed that ADD/ADHD the emphasis was on hyperactivity (constant fidgeting, emotional outbursts, no self-containment, etc). I did not study ADHD much at all—I mainly focused on what I was interested in (anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, personality disorders, very unusual psychiatric disorders). After I read the article though—it was like a revelation because I have experienced all the symptoms listed and it has negatively and deeply impacted my life in quite a few ways. I pretty much cried because I felt like I could relate to just about everything. I’ve been searching the internet and have taken multiple tests where I have scored “high” in inattentiveness.

I apologize for how long the following post is. I could be wrong but I feel you can be little less impersonal when discussing issues with a psychiatrist/therapist as oppose to a clinical from another specialty.

Childhood: I have very little recollection of my childhood years. I believe I was an average student—was never accepted into any ‘gifted classes’ like my sister---. My teachers did tell my parents that I was shy and withdrawn. I used to play video games quite a great deal, until my mother threw away my consoles (3 consoles over a number of years). I honestly don’t remember my thought processes or how I really was a child at all. I have a few sporadic memories but that’s about it. Not sure if this had any bearing—but my parents used to argue and fight a lot; and we dealt with quite a bit of societal isolation.

Teenager/Young Adult: Most I remember is towards the end of 10th grade and onwards. My grades were incredibly average until my 11th grade year. I would ended up having to retake two classes and I had to go to summer school, my grades were terrible. I could not focus or pay attention, I neglected my homework.

Adult: I’m currently 28 year old female. I live at home with my mother who has been extremely over-protective and overbearing (at times) and my father who is very distant, and my two sisters with issues of their own. I have spent around 9 years (off and on) in colleges/Universities with very little to show. I was at one University for about 3 months—was taken out, went to community college off and on for around 3.5 years—very average grades—took a bunch of classes I didn’t need—some was used to balance out my awful grades I got so my GPA didn’t look a complete mess. I ended up getting an B.S. in Psychology through a distant learning program at a University. I had to repeat multiple classes in order to graduate. I’m currently at another University pursuing a second degree in Neuroscience with the (now extinguished) hope of raising my GPA/fulfilling pre-reqs for graduate school. I’m extremely close to being put on academic probation and I had to withdraw from an entire semester of classes on the recommendation of the school psychologist (The school psychologist/psychiatrist and the psychiatrist the school referred me too-- dx me with depression and anxiety; currently on a 3rd attempt at antidepressants). I worked at a medical clinic for around 4.5 years and it has been an uphill battle that I’m still trying to work through with little avail. I don’t believe that I am a stupid or lazy person but I have major issues with concentration, forgetfulness, and procrastination.

Symptoms

•Missing details and becoming distracted easily: I am very easily distracted. At work I could be doing something, then get distracted start doing another or if someone called on me for something, then another thing and I end up with like three unfinished things or someone telling me to ‘focus’ or ‘pay attention!’.

•Trouble focusing on the task at hand/becoming bored quickly: Sometimes these two go hand in hand. If I’m browsing the internet, I can turn around and have two or three different web browsers open with 5-15 tabs on each. It’s like I can never finish one thing fully; close out and move on to the next thing. If I’m at work; and I’m doing something somewhat repetitive or monotonous then it is almost mental torture, I just can’t sit and complete a task from beginning to end. I have to stop, and do another task, then another, then I forget to finish the first task I’m doing and I end up repeating the same cycle over and over. I have spent so much time double and tripling checking all my work; spending time off the clock to make sure I did not miss anything. I *always* miss entering in some information, neglecting to sign off on something or transfer something—and went I go back I just can’t understand for the life of me how I do this? I’ll have a list that I cross out but I still didn’t even do it. I daydream constantly, to anything—listening to a lecture/audio book, reading a (text) book, etc. I can try to start reading something—my mind WILL wander then when I ‘snap’ out of it, I realize I have not read or absorbed anything. I have found that it helps a bit when I look at visual things tied into what I’m trying to learn.

•Difficulty learning or organizing new information: All the time. I’m very disorganized and my many attempts at learning things I end up forgetting relatively quickly. I feel like have to study much longer and harder than the average person to achieve the same results and it makes me feel completely incompetent and stupid at times.

•Trouble completing homework or losing items needed to stay on task: I have tons of missed homework—especially the ones online with deadlines. I always miscalculate the time it will take to finish it-I get very distracted and I lose focus a lot and I just become extremely overwhelmed. I misplace everything, all the time. My co-workers know and expect it of me. I could have something in my hand, absent-minded put it down somewhere and 5 minutes later be frantically looking for it. I feel like I lose really small but frequent chunks of time.

•Becoming confused easily or daydreaming frequently: I get flustered and confused a lot, particularly if I’m in a time-sensitive situation. I do something called maladaptive daydreaming: It is almost a compulsion—I have to have a period of time (usually 1-3 hours-at most-usually when I feel at my lowest) where I listen to music and find a room to pace back and forth and then do extreme daydreaming and run scenarios in my mind—I’ve gotten angry I’ve cried during these scenarios like I am acting out some story. It’s a weird thing I know.

•Seeming not to listen when spoken to directly: I certainly don’t mean too; but I have been told by people, co-workers that I don’t pay attention, or that I tend to look away a lot and not maintain eye contact. I try to combat this—when a person is telling me something to sound engaged—to ask like a relevant question as often as I can so I can keep up with the conversation.

•Difficulty following instructions: Embarrassingly difficult at following directions; to the point if I’m in a real brain fog my mind doesn’t register even a simple command and I end up looking like a moron.

•Processing information more slowly and with more mistakes than peers: As I’ve said above I make a lot of little mistakes that add up over time. I’m fairly sure I would have been fired if I didn’t double/triple check my work all the time; stay after, etc. I’ve been regarded as a hard worker and I believe I am well-liked but they have tolerated my disorganized nature, extreme absent-mindedness, forgetfulness.

•Procrastination/Tardiness/Disorganization-Story of my life.

I feel like a complete and utter failure, ***** up, incompetent and I just need for this to stop. I'm so frustrated and angry at what I've done (or rather haven't done) with my life and my self. I know I can do exceptionally well in things when I have the mental clarity and I am able to fully focus with the task at hand.

Letching Gray
12-30-16, 10:48 PM
Interesting. Thanks for sharing your life with us.

I have a question or two for you, if you don't mind. Do you drink coffee or caffeinated soda? Do you smoke or use nicotine? Do you gamble or become absorbed in video games or television shows? Do you exercise?

ExitMyReality88
12-30-16, 11:24 PM
Interesting. Thanks for sharing your life with us.

I have a question or two for you, if you don't mind. Do you drink coffee or caffeinated soda? Do you smoke or use nicotine? Do you gamble or become absorbed in video games or television shows? Do you exercise?

I don't drink coffee regularly--too much of it gives me heart palpitations/more noticable tremors.
I have had bouts where I smoked then I stopped. Right now I'm smoking (approx. 1 pack per week).
I do not exercise, I've made many attempts to start a routine but I haven't found the motivation to stick with it.
Yes, the internet is my achillies heel--I get very absorbed when it comes to watching t.v. shows/almost mindlessly surfing the net.
I used to play WoW and was pretty addicted at a point.

Letching Gray
12-31-16, 12:27 AM
Exit, Driven To Distraction by Hallowell and Ratey is the best book that I have read on ADHD in adults. It is very well written and Hallowell is a Harvard graduate and an M.D. who has ADHD and dyslexia. He is a brilliant but easy to read author and psychiatrist. He's a very nice guy, too. In fact, he trained and certified me as a Life Coach up in Cambridge years ago.

I knew nothing about ADHD in adults when I was first diagnosed and began treatment. If it wasn't for that particular book, I would have floundered quite a bit more than I have. He has it so he can relate to us even though he's become a renowned doctor. I will bet you that that book will help you a lot.

Obviously you are a very hard working, conscientious person. You just may have stumbled upon the missing piece to the puzzle of your frustrations. I could not pay attention almost at all and medication and the knowledge about this disorder I've acquired have given me a new life. You, my friend, are not a failure. Caution, medication works about 80% of the time. There are more choices today than ever before and scientists are pursuing new and exciting options.

From what I've read, structure is the most important external control we can apply to our lives to help manage our disorganized tendencies. Robust, vigorous exercise is the next best thing to meds to help us wake up our brains. It increases the availability of neurotransmitters that have been proven to impact our capacity to concentrate.

Seek out through universities and hospitals professors, doctors, and others to see who they recommend. Try to hook up with a well respected, top notch medical doctor specializing in ADHD with an emphasis on adults. I think Hallowell may have a Center where they might be able to refer you to a good doctor in your area. Be patient, too. A thorough work up, which is a sign you're going to a competent doctor, with a full review of your medical, academic and social history with input from family, doctors and teachers takes time. You deserve an accurate medical appraisal. Don't settle for some boob who isn't going to take your pain seriously or who isn't qualified to assess your particular strengths and weaknesses.

ExitMyReality88
12-31-16, 01:04 AM
Exit, Driven To Distraction by Hallowell and Ratey is the best book that I have read on ADHD in adults. It is very well written and Hallowell is a Harvard graduate and an M.D. who has ADHD and dyslexia. He is a brilliant but easy to read author and psychiatrist. He's a very nice guy, too. In fact, he trained and certified me as a Life Coach up in Cambridge years ago.

I knew nothing about ADHD in adults when I was first diagnosed and began treatment. If it wasn't for that particular book, I would have floundered quite a bit more than I have. He has it so he can relate to us even though he's become a renowned doctor. I will bet you that that book will help you a lot.

Obviously you are a very hard working, conscientious person. You just may have stumbled upon the missing piece to the puzzle of your frustrations. I could not pay attention almost at all and medication and the knowledge about this disorder I've acquired have given me a new life. You, my friend, are not a failure. Caution, medication works about 80% of the time. There are more choices today than ever before and scientists are pursuing new and exciting options.

From what I've read, structure is the most important external control we can apply to our lives to help manage our disorganized tendencies. Robust, vigorous exercise is the next best thing to meds to help us wake up our brains. It increases the availability of neurotransmitters that have been proven to impact our capacity to concentrate.

Seek out through universities and hospitals professors, doctors, and others to see who they recommend. Try to hook up with a well respected, top notch medical doctor specializing in ADHD with an emphasis on adults. I think Hallowell may have a Center where they might be able to refer you to a good doctor in your area. Be patient, too. A thorough work up, which is a sign you're going to a competent doctor, with a full review of your medical, academic and social history with input from family, doctors and teachers takes time. You deserve an accurate medical appraisal. Don't settle for some boob who isn't going to take your pain seriously or who isn't qualified to assess your particular strengths and weaknesses.

Thank you very much, I apperciate your response

I am currently under kaiser permenante--and I do want to speak to a professional that specializes in ADD. I will definitely look up that book, I can't say for sure if I have this, but nonetheless I want to know more about this.

I am very glad things have worked out for you, and it is very cool that he trained you. It would be absolutely amazing to have my life change around--It's been like this for so long and it's been a really difficult, mentally distressing long road and I'm at the end of my rope now.
I feel like the few clinicians I've talked too, are just seeing through me, following an incomplete algorithm and are not really addressing the issues that I've expressed--but maybe I have been going about it the wrong way and I tend to clam up a bit (I think partialy due to anxiety) when I am face to face with a provider.

I really do want to get on a real exercise routine--the times when I have started--I felt better than I normally felt.

The only thing I worry about when it comes to family history--the only person I'd be able to realistically have speak to a clinician is my older sister. My mother is very resistant to the idea of psychiartists/therapists and any recognition that something is very wrong. I did recently ask my older sister if she thought I had this, and surpisingly she said yes--I thought she was going to shoo me off or something, but she said it would explain a lot.

Letching Gray
12-31-16, 01:36 AM
Sounds good Exit. You have nothing to lose by pursuing a medical professional's informed opinion. Get that book yesterday. Look up Hallowell on the net, too. He has great information on his website. Since you have the whole 9 yards of symptoms, the chances you have ADHD are very good. The chances you will get solid medical help are very good.

I know how you feel about wanting to give up and being utterly disgusted with yourself. No one has hated me more than me. No one has been more angry with me than me and it does get old. Personally, I think you're on the verge of a wonderful break through. Honestly, with my first dose of medication I was blown away. I had no idea what it was like to pay attention--I'd never done it before. Suddenly, miraculously, I was following a report I was listening to w/o even trying. I heard every word spoken. I could not believe it. Exit, I COULD NOT BELIEVE IT

ExitMyReality88
12-31-16, 02:30 AM
Sounds good Exit. You have nothing to lose by pursuing a medical professional's informed opinion. Get that book yesterday. Look up Hallowell on the net, too. He has great information on his website. Since you have the whole 9 yards of symptoms, the chances you have ADHD are very good. The chances you will get solid medical help are very good.

I know how you feel about wanting to give up and being utterly disgusted with yourself. No one has hated me more than me. No one has been more angry with me than me and it does get old. Personally, I think you're on the verge of a wonderful break through. Honestly, with my first dose of medication I was blown away. I had no idea what it was like to pay attention--I'd never done it before. Suddenly, miraculously, I was following a report I was listening to w/o even trying. I heard every word spoken. I could not believe it. Exit, I COULD NOT BELIEVE IT

Thank you, the feeling of self-hatred is so pervasive and I can't remember a time when I felt different about myself. I am so glad that you understand and were able to overcome those feelings.
If I could truely experience that, it would be the most surreal, life altering thing. I've tried so hard and just nothing, worse then nothing. Just to feel and think and process things normally that's all I've ever wanted.

ExitMyReality88
12-31-16, 03:22 AM
It seems to take me a while to "connect the dots" to things, but I was thinking about my mother, and I feel she may have this as well. She spoke a lot to us about going to a more pretigious high school and no matter how much and how long she studied, she still made below average grades---she attributed this to going to a subpar middle school in NYC. My mother is very intelligent. I would say more but I don't want to put all of her business out here. But there are multiple things, that I realized that makes me believe she has ADD.

sarahsweets
12-31-16, 07:33 AM
I understand that only a licensed clinician can diagnosed me, and what I have written here is what I am going to send to my therapist via online messaging. I was wondering if you all could tell me if I am missing any pertinent information or anything I need to shorten/would be better to explain in person. I find it much easier to write rather then speak to a provider because it gives me time to collect my thoughts.

I think you you definitely consider and in person discussion of this post. I get wanting to remember to share everything and this is extremely well organized and I would hate for you to appear "to organized".


Childhood: I have very little recollection of my childhood years. I believe I was an average student—was never accepted into any ‘gifted classes’ like my sister---. My teachers did tell my parents that I was shy and withdrawn. I used to play video games quite a great deal, until my mother threw away my consoles (3 consoles over a number of years). I honestly don’t remember my thought processes or how I really was a child at all. I have a few sporadic memories but that’s about it. Not sure if this had any bearing—but my parents used to argue and fight a lot; and we dealt with quite a bit of societal isolation.

Its important to take a look at this. ADHD symptoms must have been present by age 7 and impair your life in 6 or more ways in 2 or more areas of your life to be considered adhd.


Teenager/Young Adult: Most I remember is towards the end of 10th grade and onwards. My grades were incredibly average until my 11th grade year. I would ended up having to retake two classes and I had to go to summer school, my grades were terrible. I could not focus or pay attention, I neglected my homework.

See above.

Adult: I’m currently 28 year old female. I live at home with my mother who has been extremely over-protective and overbearing (at times) and my father who is very distant, and my two sisters with issues of their own. I have spent around 9 years (off and on) in colleges/Universities with very little to show. I was at one University for about 3 months—was taken out, went to community college off and on for around 3.5 years—very average grades—took a bunch of classes I didn’t need—some was used to balance out my awful grades I got so my GPA didn’t look a complete mess. I ended up getting an B.S. in Psychology through a distant learning program at a University. I had to repeat multiple classes in order to graduate. I’m currently at another University pursuing a second degree in Neuroscience with the (now extinguished) hope of raising my GPA/fulfilling pre-reqs for graduate school. I’m extremely close to being put on academic probation and I had to withdraw from an entire semester of classes on the recommendation of the school psychologist (The school psychologist/psychiatrist and the psychiatrist the school referred me too-- dx me with depression and anxiety; currently on a 3rd attempt at antidepressants). I worked at a medical clinic for around 4.5 years and it has been an uphill battle that I’m still trying to work through with little avail. I don’t believe that I am a stupid or lazy person but I have major issues with concentration, forgetfulness, and procrastination.
?Is there a reason you live at home besides financial? I dont know if living with someone that you say is overbearing or overprotective at times is the healthiest for you. what kind of issues do your sisters have? I dont think you are a failure if you have managed to get 1 degree an are working on the 2nd.

I feel like a complete and utter failure, ***** up, incompetent and I just need for this to stop. I'm so frustrated and angry at what I've done (or rather haven't done) with my life and my self. I know I can do exceptionally well in things when I have the mental clarity and I am able to fully focus with the task at hand.



Your symptoms definitely are something I can identify with. But they are also things that could lead to other diagnosis. Its important to rule those out and make sure its not something else. Even if its not adhd, its important to figure out what it is and make sure you get treatment for it.

Letching Gray
12-31-16, 11:26 PM
Hi Exit,

Not sure I understand your question but I'll give it shot. Sure-forward any information to your first therapist that is relevant to your overall health. Send your new therapist the same type of data. Anything that you believe is relevant to your situation, send it and/or bring it with you. And certainly you would want to ask to see someone with expertise in ADHD. If they prefer, agree to be seen by someone initially who does more generalized intake or evaluations. That may be where they want to start.

They, hopefully, will have sufficient expertise in a wide field of disorders that matching you with the correct therapist will not be difficult. If the new therapist you are scheduled to see has already been assigned to your case based on a thorough workup, you are past the initial phase.

To treat you with medications, if that's what they choose is the best route to take, only an M.D., D.O. or Physician's Assistant can prescribe it. He/she may rely upon your therapist's recommendations, but they should be very familiar with who you are before prescribing any psychotropic med.

"Conners" is a continuous performance test that has proven to be helpful in diagnosing ADHD. I have no relationship with them, just to be clear.

"The Conners Continuous Performance Test 3rd Edition™ (Conners CPT 3™) is a task-oriented computerized assessment of attention-related problems in individuals aged 8 years and older. By indexing the respondent’s performance in areas of inattentiveness, impulsivity, sustained attention, and vigilance, the Conners CPT 3 can be useful to the process of diagnosing Attention-Deficit/Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD) and other neurological conditions related to attention. The Conners CPT 3 provides objective information about an individual’s performance in attention tasks, complementing information obtained from rating scales such as the Conners 3."

Maybe they can administer this test. Ask for it if it makes sense.

I'm not familiar with your medical insurance provider, so I hope I'm not leading you astray. And you are not disturbing me. If I can help anyone find help with this destructive but often misunderstood disorder, I'm more than happy to do so.

I suffered as a result of living with undiagnosed ADHD. ADHD wasn't and isn't something I have. I am ADHD. It defined my life and permanently damaged me. Living with it day in and day out, not knowing what was wrong with me, was like trying to participate in routine activities with uncorrected "legally blind" eyesight, without realizing I just needed a pair of glasses.

To anyone who thinks our inability to attend consistently developed from our parents lack of involvement or from spoiling us, etc., consider the literature which confirms what we've maintained all along. We display numerous differences and patterns of differences across various kinds of brain scans and tests in addition to the genetic component.

sarahsweets
01-01-17, 10:20 AM
To anyone who thinks our inability to attend consistently developed from our parents lack of involvement or from spoiling us, etc., consider the literature which confirms what we've maintained all along. We display numerous differences and patterns of differences across various kinds of brain scans and tests in addition to the genetic component.
I wish there was more research to back this up. It would be so cool if I could whip out a brain scan to slay the naysayers.

Letching Gray
01-01-17, 12:49 PM
I wish there was more research to back this up. It would be so cool if I could whip out a brain scan to slay the naysayers.

Hey Sarahsweets. The literature is filled with evidence of our differences. Look up fMRI and PET scans on ADHD. It's remarkable what researchers are uncovering these days. There is no question that ADHD has a biological basis. True, no single biological test proves it exists, yet. It is too complicated for that at this point. Instead, a number of tests confirms a multitude of factors contribute to this crazy condition.

ExitMyReality88
01-01-17, 11:15 PM
I think you you definitely consider and in person discussion of this post. I get wanting to remember to share everything and this is extremely well organized and I would hate for you to appear "to organized".

I do understand that, any long messages I write in Word so that I can come back to it. It tends to be difficult to discuss indepth things in person without something to keep me on track.


Its important to take a look at this. ADHD symptoms must have been present by age 7 and impair your life in 6 or more ways in 2 or more areas of your life to be considered adhd.

Yes, I do understand this. I don't know how much light I can shed on that as I have very little personal memory of me as a child.

See above.

?Is there a reason you live at home besides financial? I dont know if living with someone that you say is overbearing or overprotective at times is the healthiest for you. what kind of issues do your sisters have? I dont think you are a failure if you have managed to get 1 degree an are working on the 2nd.

It's purely financial at this point in time. All my money is poured into paying for schools, loans, insurance, cc, etc. Which I pay for late often. I don't know how many letters/calls,I've recieved because I haven't made payments, I've had my health care insurance terminated before due to non-payment, I've paid many late penalty fees, and it's not an issue of not being able to pay for it. I don't know I just keep putting it off.


Your symptoms definitely are something I can identify with. But they are also things that could lead to other diagnosis. Its important to rule those out and make sure its not something else. Even if its not adhd, its important to figure out what it is and make sure you get treatment for it.

That is what I'm trying to figure out. They say I have depression and anxiety. Which I do, I've been on bouts of antidepressants--has not helped me. I'm currently on prozac (been taking it for about a week) so it is too early to tell. They need to figure out what it is, because I am pretty sick and tired of living like this.

ExitMyReality88
01-01-17, 11:21 PM
Hi Exit,

Not sure I understand your question but I'll give it shot. Sure-forward any information to your first therapist that is relevant to your overall health. Send your new therapist the same type of data. Anything that you believe is relevant to your situation, send it and/or bring it with you. And certainly you would want to ask to see someone with expertise in ADHD. If they prefer, agree to be seen by someone initially who does more generalized intake or evaluations. That may be where they want to start.

They, hopefully, will have sufficient expertise in a wide field of disorders that matching you with the correct therapist will not be difficult. If the new therapist you are scheduled to see has already been assigned to your case based on a thorough workup, you are past the initial phase.

To treat you with medications, if that's what they choose is the best route to take, only an M.D., D.O. or Physician's Assistant can prescribe it. He/she may rely upon your therapist's recommendations, but they should be very familiar with who you are before prescribing any psychotropic med.

"Conners" is a continuous performance test that has proven to be helpful in diagnosing ADHD. I have no relationship with them, just to be clear.

"The Conners Continuous Performance Test 3rd Edition™ (Conners CPT 3™) is a task-oriented computerized assessment of attention-related problems in individuals aged 8 years and older. By indexing the respondent’s performance in areas of inattentiveness, impulsivity, sustained attention, and vigilance, the Conners CPT 3 can be useful to the process of diagnosing Attention-Deficit/Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD) and other neurological conditions related to attention. The Conners CPT 3 provides objective information about an individual’s performance in attention tasks, complementing information obtained from rating scales such as the Conners 3."

Maybe they can administer this test. Ask for it if it makes sense.

I'm not familiar with your medical insurance provider, so I hope I'm not leading you astray. And you are not disturbing me. If I can help anyone find help with this destructive but often misunderstood disorder, I'm more than happy to do so.

I suffered as a result of living with undiagnosed ADHD. ADHD wasn't and isn't something I have. I am ADHD. It defined my life and permanently damaged me. Living with it day in and day out, not knowing what was wrong with me, was like trying to participate in routine activities with uncorrected "legally blind" eyesight, without realizing I just needed a pair of glasses.

To anyone who thinks our inability to attend consistently developed from our parents lack of involvement or from spoiling us, etc., consider the literature which confirms what we've maintained all along. We display numerous differences and patterns of differences across various kinds of brain scans and tests in addition to the genetic component.

Thank you for this information, I was curious to see if there were any psychological tests I could take, I will ask them about this. I'm trying to find a good therapist/psychologist and psychiatrist I've already seen a handful of them and as I've said they all seem to just not really hear what I'm saying, but then again maybe im not conveying things the right now

sarahsweets
01-03-17, 06:57 AM
Hey Sarahsweets. The literature is filled with evidence of our differences. Look up fMRI and PET scans on ADHD. It's remarkable what researchers are uncovering these days. There is no question that ADHD has a biological basis. True, no single biological test proves it exists, yet. It is too complicated for that at this point. Instead, a number of tests confirms a multitude of factors contribute to this crazy condition.

Is this research the real deal- as in peer reviewed and all that? Is it something one could show a doctor or person and have it be unequivocal?

Letching Gray
01-03-17, 09:31 AM
Is this research the real deal- as in peer reviewed and all that? Is it something one could show a doctor or person and have it be unequivocal?



Indeed. That there are established differences between the brains of those with ADHD and those who do not is factual and published in peer reviewed literature.