View Full Version : Just Curious


wltripp74
01-02-17, 09:54 PM
I am wondering with my children being treated for ADHD their wholes lives what happens when they can longer be on my insurance. When they do not have insurance themselves and the medicine cost are too expensive for them. What happens to them then? I have ADD my self and when I was a child we just dealt with it there was no medicine so you just had to learn how to cope with things. I am afraid that kids who have been on meds their whole live may stumble if they have to go without. Just looking for some insight. Thanks.

aeon
01-02-17, 10:03 PM
Stumble they may...but they will do the best they are able, to better end, or not.

There has been medication for ADHD since the mid-1950s, though diagnosis and treatment weren't up to snuff then.


Cheers,
Ian

dvdnvwls
01-03-17, 12:27 PM
The difference is only this:

If they take medication and later have to stop it, they may stumble at that time.

If they never take medication, they will stumble for their entire lives.

Stumbling only part of the time is far better.

Medication gives them a better chance to learn to cope, because without it they have a harder time keeping the coping skills organized in their mind. Many times off of medication I've learned a coping skill and then realized I already learned it before.


There is a common belief that if you really really must do something because you have no choice, then eventually you will learn. It isn't true. One of the main problems with ADHD is that there are some things we never naturally learn, no matter how urgent the situation is and no matter how much practice we get. Which things those are can differ from person to person.

So... It isn't a choice between learning "the easy way" or "the hard way". It's a choice between learning with the help of medication, or never learning at all.

So many hundreds of times, people have tried to help me with this kind of thing. They think "With time and practice and my experienced guidance, this guy's problems will be solved". They forget that if that was true I would have solved them long ago myself.

Caco3girl
01-03-17, 03:34 PM
I am wondering with my children being treated for ADHD their wholes lives what happens when they can longer be on my insurance. When they do not have insurance themselves and the medicine cost are too expensive for them. What happens to them then? I have ADD my self and when I was a child we just dealt with it there was no medicine so you just had to learn how to cope with things. I am afraid that kids who have been on meds their whole live may stumble if they have to go without. Just looking for some insight. Thanks.

Well first off, why assume they can't afford the meds/insurance? Secondly, from what I have been told, many of the issues a child with ADHD faces are not the same issues an adult faces. That whole thing about ADHD kids being about 30% less mature than their peers is SOOOO true! So, as a 25 year old I'm assuming my son will have better control over his impulses.

As for the issues that will always be there....well I am hoping he will learn many coping skills while he is on the meds. I'm also hoping that he gravitates to a job that his ADHD doesn't hinder much. I don't see him exploring the world of an accountant who sits at a desk in a cubicle all day, he will likely go for park ranger, or police officer, something that changes his environment daily.

They are still the same person on meds and off. My son will likely gravitate to something that works WITH his ADHD rather than against it, and so will yours.

ginniebean
01-03-17, 06:30 PM
According to the research children medicated earlt enough develop better coping mechanisms. yes, i too gree up in a time when you just coped and did the best you could. i think I turned out all right. that said 25% of the US prison population is said to have untreated and undiagnosed adhd.

you ask a good question. For my own opinion. I would not take chances with my kids future. Give them what they need to thrive now and trust it's enough to get them thru the very hard bumps of life

ToneTone
01-03-17, 10:10 PM
I live in a city where people can get discount medicines if they lack the income. Lots of the drug stores have discount programs.

Pharmaceutical companies sometimes give medications free to people whose incomes are below a certain level. These programs are called Patient Assistance or Pharmaceutical Assistance Programs.

One guy on this board a number of years back found out about one of these programs, wrote the company and got the medication either free or at extreme discount. He was so pleased.

Lots of ADHD medications are now in generic form and there is usually a way to get generics for low prices.

Tone

aeon
01-03-17, 10:41 PM
Lots of ADHD medications are now in generic form and there is usually a way to get generics for low prices.

Yep, I only pay $305 per month for Dexedrine CR instead of $625.


Cheers,
Ian