View Full Version : Is medication for ADHD considered a coping mechanism?


mildadhd
01-09-17, 10:04 PM
Is medication for ADHD considered a coping mechanism?


777

mctavish23
01-09-17, 10:23 PM
No more than insulin for diabetes. Seriously.

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

john2100
01-09-17, 10:34 PM
Is medication for ADHD considered a coping mechanism?


777

What is your definition of coping mechanism?

mildadhd
01-09-17, 10:56 PM
What is your definition of coping mechanism?


I do not have a definition, yet.

I am asking.




777

mildadhd
01-09-17, 11:38 PM
In general, here are the general classifications of coping mechanisms:


Defense - the unconscious ways of coping stress. ...

Adaptive -tolerates the stress. ...

Avoidance -keeps self away from the stress. ...

Attack - diverts one's consciousness to a person or group of individuals other than the stressor or the stressful situation.

-Uncle Google


777?

mildadhd
01-09-17, 11:47 PM
coping mechanism

any effort directed to stress management, including task-oriented and ego defense mechanisms, the factors that enable an individual to regain emotional equilibrium after a stressful experience. It may be an unconscious process.
Mosby's Medical Dictionary, 9th edition. 2009, Elsevier.

coping mechanism

Psychiatry Any conscious or unconscious mechanism of adjusting to environmental stress without altering personal goals or purposes
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/coping+mechanism


777?

C15H25N3O
01-09-17, 11:52 PM
No. Medication is no coping mechanism for ADHD.

Greyhound1
01-10-17, 12:05 AM
I think of medication to be a treatment and not really a mechanism.

Based off the definitions, perhaps it's the act or desire for taking medication that could be a considered a coping mechanism.

mildadhd
01-10-17, 12:46 AM
Medical Definition of mechanism. ... 2a: a bodily process or function <the mechanism of healing>b: the combination of mental processes by which a result is obtained <psychological mechanisms> 3: the fundamental physical or chemical processes involved in or responsible for an action, reaction, or other natural phenomenon.
Mechanism | Definition of Mechanism by Merriam-Webster

Good idea to look at the term "mechanism" Greyhound1.

It seems to depend on the context of coping and mechanism?

Fascinating discussion!

I have not decided yet.



777?

Greyhound1
01-10-17, 01:23 AM
Definition 3 refers to it as a "natural phenomenon" and #2 says "mental processes" and #1 refers to "bodily function" which all would rule out medication being a mechanism, no?

mildadhd
01-10-17, 11:23 PM
"chemical processes" has me stumped.

Medical Definition of mechanism. ... 2a: a bodily process or function b: the combination of mental processes by which a result is obtained 3: the fundamental physical or chemical processes involved in or responsible for an action, reaction, or other natural phenomenon.
Mechanism | Definition of Mechanism by Merriam-Webster

Is it bad to say medication is a coping mechanism?

What is the "other" alternative to "no" and "yes"

I really do not know, but I am fascinated by this conversation.

I never noticed the reduction of distresses associated with coping styles.

Methyphenidate temporarily reduced my distresses, gave me time to work some things out, I presently am not taking methyphenidate.

I think I am more aware in someway from the experience.


777

Greyhound1
01-10-17, 11:41 PM
Some of my coping "skills" can be quite effective and also so destructive. Such as anxiety and obsessive thoughts. Both effective for motivating and remembering but not good for my mental health and stability.

Johnny Slick
01-11-17, 12:09 AM
I said yes because by the broadest terms, yes, it's a way you can mitigate the effects of ADHD. I can totally understand why others disagree with this though.

daveddd
01-11-17, 12:13 AM
sure

semantics

Greyhound1
01-12-17, 01:34 AM
I don't think we can afford to single out just ADHD medication if considering it to be a coping mechanism. Under the broadest terms all medication would also be.

Alaskamoose
01-12-17, 02:06 AM
Is medication for ADHD considered a coping mechanism?


777
My therapist told me that taking meds for my adhd were not optional if I wanted a life; I would not call that a coping mechanism; do you have adhd? If you rely have it and meds have worked for you, this would not even be a logical question :)

sarahsweets
01-12-17, 05:57 AM
Definitely a treatment vs a coping mechanism in my opinion. To me, coping skills are things like using lists or timers or reminders. Medication makes using those lists, timers and reminders possible.

Pilgrim
01-12-17, 08:05 AM
A substitution for what's not there. Given the right dosage by a dr with the right expertise

it's morally the right move. If I get hopelessly hurt by it I'm gunna sue.

Little Nut
01-12-17, 10:37 AM
-Uncle Google
In general, here are the general classifications of coping mechanisms:

Defense - the unconscious ways of coping stress. ...

Adaptive -tolerates the stress. ...

Avoidance -keeps self away from the stress. ...

Attack - diverts one's consciousness to a person or group of individuals other than the stressor or the stressful situation.

777?

Simply, I look at it as eliminating or alleviating the stressor(s). So I guess using the above criteria the med is a coping mechanism because it "avoids" the stress.

Did I get it right?

Dachshund
01-12-17, 11:50 AM
Generally, a coping mechanism is a behavioral or mental process that soothes and alleviates stress. Things such as thumb sucking, repetitive motions, etc. This also includes things such as substance abuse, because the abuse of the substance is motivated by behavior and the stress. The substance is not the coping mechanism, but the behavior to reach for that substance is the coping mechanism. For example, stress eating. Food itself is not a coping mechanism, it is a requirement of life. But the act of reaching for food in stressful times is the coping mechanism.

So unless you're reaching for ADHD meds in a substance abusive manner, no. No more then a diabetic using insulin, or using a high blood pressure medication to treat high blood pressure.