View Full Version : How is your Magnesium intake?


Fraser_0762
01-14-17, 09:36 AM
I've been reading from multiple sources that state that Magnesium is the most under supplemented mineral in the western diet.

I'm wondering who on here takes Magnesium suppliments and how much and for how long?

I currently take a combination of suppliments which include, 5-HTP, Ginkgo Biloba, Pro-Biotics, multi-vitamins, Omega 3 fish oils and i've just recieved my Magnesium suppliments today.

I wasn't expecting much from the Magnesium suppliments. But surprisingly after only taking one, I am feeling quite a difference. It may just be placebo, but if i'm supplimenting something that has been almost absent in my diet my entire life, then perhaps not.

Unmanagable
01-14-17, 02:22 PM
I don't remember the dosage on mine, and I don't always remember to take them daily, but I do take them several times a week, and have been for quite a while now, at least 2 years, I think.

I also take D3, zinc, Vit. C, and a few others not daily, but as I feel my body needs them, like for joint pains, etc.

I also make it a point to soak in a hot epsom salt bath for 20-30 minutes at least once a week, but usually more, especially now that it's winter time. If you don't have access to a bath tub, soaking your feet in a tub of hot epsom salt water for 20-30 minutes will also provide relief, I've found.

I feel more relaxed, experience less aches and pains (arthritic and fibro), and enjoy the purposeful moments of silence in the tub, or use that time to listen to some favorite jammage, or watch something from You Tube University.

I remember reading something a long time ago stating that hospitals used to use magnesium solutions in the IV bags instead of the saline solution they use now. I never dug any deeper to check that out, but found it interesting, nonetheless.

Fraser_0762
01-14-17, 05:54 PM
Hey, thanks for the info. :)

I'm not sure what it is, but things just feel "smoother" when I take Magnesium. My emotions don't feel so up and down.

dvdnvwls
01-14-17, 06:16 PM
Hey, thanks for the info. :)

I'm not sure what it is, but things just feel "smoother" when I take Magnesium. My emotions don't feel so up and down.
Everything is... ummm... smoother... with some magnesium. ;)

Fraser_0762
01-14-17, 06:21 PM
Everything is... ummm... smoother... with some magnesium. ;)

I'll accept smooth over shrunken anyday. :D

BellaVita
01-14-17, 09:58 PM
I take magnesium citrate daily – 100 mg x3 a day.

I definitely have noticed a difference since I have started taking it. It makes me feel calmer, and slightly reduces my anxiety.

Also taking it before bed, I think it helps me sleep a bit better.

I find it is important to spread the dose throughout the day, one morning one afternoon one night.

I've been taking magnesium citrate for at least several months now, perhaps longer.

sarahsweets
01-15-17, 03:13 AM
I take chelated magnesium at night to help with sleep. Ill have to look later at how much it is.

Fraser_0762
01-15-17, 03:17 AM
I think the recommended daily intake for adults is 400mgs. But apparently very few people get even a quarter of that in their daily diet. it's a unique mineral as the body can't produce it on it's own.

MissAnnThrope
01-17-17, 12:23 PM
I started taking magnesium to help with sleep (400 mgs.) long before I was diagnosed. Usually take the full dose right before bed.

I have been contemplating whether I should spread the dose out throughout the day. The *last* thing I need is to feel sleepy at work, etc.

Does anyone have any *recent, updated* info about which form of magnesium is "best" - for ADD?

I've always heard one should stick to the "-ates." I started with Magnesium citrate, but switched to magnesium glycinate when I heard it is better for sleep/relaxation. And honestly, I haven't really been able to tell the difference, but in this scenario, I think it is worth asking. :)

Also, does anyone have a brand to recommend? (I admit to being a little paranoid about supplement manufacturers - we know many brands are substandard, contain fillers, etc., and that many brands are actually manufactured by pharmaceutical companies, etc.)

Thanks!

Fraser_0762
01-17-17, 12:30 PM
It's known to be most effective in the chelated form. Not sure how other brands compare, but I use Swansons Premium Brand and it seems to work well enough.

C15H25N3O
01-17-17, 12:33 PM
I have 300mg magnesiumcitrate granulate. One pack I think is good each day
but I also abuse it to flavor my soda and end at 900mg/day. I believe I do this
substance abuse due to ADHD but it dont hurt.

Bethylphenidate
01-17-17, 01:17 PM
After taking magnesium citrate for a full month, I noticed a significantly positive difference in the way I felt physically. Prior to that, an emergency room doctor told me my levels were low, and I'd read many good reviews online about magnesium supplementation.

Now that I've increased my intake of magnesium with foods, I've stopped taking it in supplement form. The label says "highly absorbable," and I think it is! Personally, I'm worried that in attempting to increase my magnesium levels, I might detrimentally decrease my calcium levels. (I'm not telling anyone to stop taking it, just sharing my story. I might be incorrect, but I decided not to mess with those minerals until I see a doctor.)

Oh, and I noticed I did best when taking the 100mg capsules separately instead of all 3 at once. One time at work, I took one... and then a half hour later took another one because I forgot I took the first one. It didn't knock me out, but I started to feel a little sleepy during the middle of my shift, and at first I had no idea why, lol. (I wasn't stressing, though! :lol:)

Rockafella83
01-29-17, 01:39 PM
I started taking magnesium to help with sleep (400 mgs.) long before I was diagnosed. Usually take the full dose right before bed.

I have been contemplating whether I should spread the dose out throughout the day. The *last* thing I need is to feel sleepy at work, etc.

Does anyone have any *recent, updated* info about which form of magnesium is "best" - for ADD?

I've always heard one should stick to the "-ates." I started with Magnesium citrate, but switched to magnesium glycinate when I heard it is better for sleep/relaxation. And honestly, I haven't really been able to tell the difference, but in this scenario, I think it is worth asking. :)

Also, does anyone have a brand to recommend? (I admit to being a little paranoid about supplement manufacturers - we know many brands are substandard, contain fillers, etc., and that many brands are actually manufactured by pharmaceutical companies, etc.)

Thanks!
I might suggest Magnesium Threonate. Absorption as good as Magnesium Sulfate without the bad "Side Effects".

The main purpose is that it's one of the best form (with Sulfate) to elevate brain magnesium, where it might make a positive difference over all the other forms.. Why ? I can't explain this within a few lines but let's just say that supplements in generals come with differents forms having differents absorptions and effects on your body.

The long answer could be found there;
Efficacy and Safety of MMFS-01, a Synapse Density Enhancer, for Treating Cognitive Impairment in Older Adults: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial
(https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4927823/)

The compound refered in the article MMFS-01 is Magnesium threonate.

For thoses who don't like to read;

Finally, it is not known if MMFS-01 can reverse cognitive impairment in those with more severe cognitive deficits, such as AD. To evaluate this, we are currently testing MMFS-01 in another trial with mild and moderate AD patients.**
** That mean, it won't do miracles as most supplements for ADHD, n'est-ce pas, @SaraSweets !? ; )


CONCLUSIONS
In summary, the current study demonstrated efficacy of MMFS-01, a compound designed to increase brain synapse density, on restoration of cognitive abilities. This study highlights the importance of increasing neuronal intracellular magnesium, a key intermediary of synapse density control, on improving cognitive abilities in older adults.

Go to:

Rockafella83
01-29-17, 03:13 PM
While i'm on that subject;

I would like to say that this is only one study, not meta-analysis or larger scale study. That's does'nt mean that it's innacurate or what a few people in US would call "alternative facts" !

The reason why i'm saying this is I see a lot of articles by many pro-supplements blog and people with a PHD Degree (Mercola, Oz) who, sometimes, oversimplify research studies and exaggerate their implications on potential usage. Don't forget it's a multi-billion dollars industry and the perception of a lot of peoples is, that taking a supplements (instead of a medication) look's like less of an illness concerning every taboo society still has on.

So everyone who look at articles or news (especially in that field concerning your health), should be critic about it. It does'nt mean it's not worth using it, it mean don't take everything they say (including what I just put up there) for the truth or even a facts. I tend to see this forum as an exchange place, a collaborative project but as everything placed on internet, it's easy to get lost..

For example;

-The guys who developt Magnesium threonate (Dr Guasong Liu) was a Professor at MIT for over 10 years (So ok, let's say he got some credibility).

-But on the other hands, the previous studies and articles that I read about it (a few done at MIT) implicate imself and Magtein, the patent he put on it so how big was the influence to promote the product ? Because from now on, it's not just a scientific discovery or a novel compound, it's also a product.

-There are no long term studies as it came out within the last 5 years so there is also just a few independant one who came slowly as scientists just start to understand the mechanism behind it.

-Still, that does'nt mean there is no credibility behind all the statements from this article as I start to see multiples studies about that compound showing that Science has a interest on it.

So just be carefull when you browse the web especially when it concern your health !

sarek
01-29-17, 04:22 PM
After taking magnesium citrate for a full month, I noticed a significantly positive difference in the way I felt physically. Prior to that, an emergency room doctor told me my levels were low, and I'd read many good reviews online about magnesium supplementation.

Now that I've increased my intake of magnesium with foods, I've stopped taking it in supplement form. The label says "highly absorbable," and I think it is! Personally, I'm worried that in attempting to increase my magnesium levels, I might detrimentally decrease my calcium levels. (I'm not telling anyone to stop taking it, just sharing my story. I might be incorrect, but I decided not to mess with those minerals until I see a doctor.)

Oh, and I noticed I did best when taking the 100mg capsules separately instead of all 3 at once. One time at work, I took one... and then a half hour later took another one because I forgot I took the first one. It didn't knock me out, but I started to feel a little sleepy during the middle of my shift, and at first I had no idea why, lol. (I wasn't stressing, though! :lol:)

In order to attain a proper mineral balance, magnesium alone is not enough. The magic four are calcium, magnesium, vitamin D3 and vitamin K2. Together they regulate mineral balance.
Most people already get a good calcium (perhaps too good) intake, so not much supplementation needed. Once we start supplementing with magnesium, adding high dosages of vitamin D3 and K2 will help bone health.

Another very dangerous risk factor is fluoride, one of the most lethal neurotoxins. For many people, its in the water, which is quite unbelievable. This absolutely needs to be compensated for since it poisons many organs as well as the nervous system and brain. It also attracts calcium to all the wrong places, such as blood vessels and important glands. This is where magnesium supplementation is very useful, since it helps push the calcium out of those places.

Fraser_0762
01-29-17, 04:27 PM
Another very dangerous risk factor is fluoride, one of the most lethal neurotoxins. For many people, its in the water, which is quite unbelievable. This absolutely needs to be compensated for since it poisons many organs as well as the nervous system and brain. It also attracts calcium to all the wrong places, such as blood vessels and important glands. This is where magnesium supplementation is very useful, since it helps push the calcium out of those places.

I was talking about this on another thread. Even more unbelievably, people are prescribed fluoride pills! There is absolutely no health benefit to ingesting fluoride whatsoever.

Wuvmy3kitties
02-05-17, 02:11 PM
In order to attain a proper mineral balance, magnesium alone is not enough. The magic four are calcium, magnesium, vitamin D3 and vitamin K2. Together they regulate mineral balance.
Most people already get a good calcium (perhaps too good) intake, so not much supplementation needed. Once we start supplementing with magnesium, adding high dosages of vitamin D3 and K2 will help bone health.

Does anyone make a supplement containing all of the above? Especially the safe Magnesium? Also, is it safe to take with prescription meds? I currently take Celexa 40 mg. but if this would help improve my ADHD (and maybe even AvPD), I'd love to add it to my diet.

Fraser_0762
02-05-17, 03:19 PM
It (supposedly) helps with stimulant side effects and is believed to help reverse tolerance. I can't say it as an absolute fact however, it's just what i've read/heard from multiple sources.

Simargl
02-05-17, 05:27 PM
Funny, this is what I've been reading up on the last few days.

I tried following Sarah's advice on chelated magnesium but I couldn't find any capsules that agreed with my allergies. I ended up buying a calcium / mag / D complex. It has 200iu of D3, 500mg of calcium and 250mg of magnesium. The instructions suggest for it to be taken twice daily but I'm only going to take it before bed. I don't want to take the chance of it interacting with my meds. I started taking it last night. I hope it helps. I've been hurting and dragging lately.

Wuvmy3kitties
02-06-17, 12:14 PM
I purchased this, have any of you tried it?

https://www.wonderlabs.com/itemleft.php?itemnum=6301

(https://www.wonderlabs.com/itemleft.php?itemnum=6301)(Not sure if it's ok to post that link, so if not, let me know.)

sarek
02-08-17, 03:55 AM
One more caveat on magnesium. It can be hard on the digestive tract when taken orally in large doses. For that reason its often better to apply the magnesium transdermally, in the form of magnesium chloride spray.

Simply apply the spray to the skin. The magnesium will be absorbed and work topically, supplementing local shortages. If there are no local shortages, the bloodstream will take the excess magnesium to wherever else it may be needed.

One of the advantages or transdermal application is that you will get a stinging sensation if there is a local shortage. That tells you that part of your body sorely needs it.
Through transdermal application you can avoid digestive issues.

20thcenturyfox
02-08-17, 04:07 PM
In order to attain a proper mineral balance, magnesium alone is not enough. The magic four are calcium, magnesium, vitamin D3 and vitamin K2. Together they regulate mineral balance.
Most people already get a good calcium (perhaps too good) intake, so not much supplementation needed. Once we start supplementing with magnesium, adding high dosages of vitamin D3 and K2 will help bone health..

I have been taking extra calcium, magnesium, D3 and K2 for so long I couldn't say if they have any psychoactive effects. But I'm curious to know if there are any verified interactions, competition or absorption issues amongst these 4 supplements.

One absorption issue I know of is that the bran/fiber in various whole grains inhibits the absorption of many minerals (incl Ca and Mg) and some oils. Since I often have a high fiber breakfast, I switched to take most of my supplements (other than D3) at night.

Occasionally I have read that Ca and Mg compete and should not be taken together. However, I have not seen this substantiated or repeated in any "higher-reliabilty" sources. What does seem substantiated is that larger oral doses taken at one time are not well absorbed, so if you are taking more than about 400mg Ca and 200mg Mg at a time, you would get better absorption by breaking them up.

About a year ago I learned that I have had moderate--and worsening--Vitamin D deficiency, despite supplementing more or less regularly with D3 and Cod Liver Oil. Of course I've since increased the D3, so that part seems to be turning around. But according to Dr. Jack Kruse Mg and D3 compete and should not be taken together (he recommends taking Magnesium Threonate at night and D3 in the morning). Because I thought possibly this could have contributed to my D3 deficiency, I've started to do that. But I haven't seen this anywhere else.

Then K2 is said to be best absorbed taken with Ca and Vit C. (Oh and BTW, Sarek, Ca deficiency may be rare in the Netherlands, but I don't think this holds in North America, where I think cheese and milk consumption are much lower...most authorities say most of us are short on Ca.)

Anyone have any better information?