View Full Version : Employer Medical Benefits, boon or bane?


Postulate
01-29-17, 09:24 PM
I was fired from two jobs where things began going south after I made a claim for Dexedrine via my employer's medical insurance at the pharmacy, where the insurer was responsible for paying 90% of the bill. I am well aware that this may be a coincidence, and I'm also aware that me being paranoid about it might be a Dexedrine side effect, however, certain events that occurred at the workplace lead me to believe that there might be more to it:

During a meeting with my manager, it was stated that my trainer tried to "accommodate me" on my request to take notes on the computer, and that I was later on observed to check my e-mail instead of taking notes. I immediately asked my manager why she used the word to "accommodate", she was left speechless and changed subject. I believe that if the word was innocently used, she would have had no problem explaining how it was fitting the context. This came after a light-up back and forth exchange where she wasn't winning much of the argument so I do believe she talked too much in the pressure of the moment. I might be wrong though.

I'm typically the guy that gets along with everybody and engages everybody in conversations. I noticed a change in attitude from management after I made my Dexedrine claim. They were setting traps, and interpreting performance data in a very negative way, although the data was good enough to leave a lot more than the benefit of the doubt. They were trying to say that my performance was well below my colleagues, however, since I was very popular and was asking my colleagues many questions, I had perhaps a more clear picture of where they were at than the managers themselves. It's very hard to tell a person who is helping many others complete their tasks, that they are doing bad. Whatever, it's like everyone was not my friend anymore.

I'm honestly at a point where I'm no longer making benefit claims through my employer, fearing that they might fire me after they learn what medication I'm on. I was just wondering, in absence of a disclosure from my part, if they enter my medical file and find out that my medication treats a mental health issue, can the insurance company decide that I'm not insurable for my pay grade and request management to fire me?

Also are there any legal ramifications to this, if indeed I can prove they did this, are there any ways around it?

sarahsweets
01-30-17, 05:40 AM
I was fired from two jobs where things began going south after I made a claim for Dexedrine via my employer's medical insurance at the pharmacy, where the insurer was responsible for paying 90% of the bill. I am well aware that this may be a coincidence, and I'm also aware that me being paranoid about it might be a Dexedrine side effect, however, certain events that occurred at the workplace lead me to believe that there might be more to it:

During a meeting with my manager, it was stated that my trainer tried to "accommodate me" on my request to take notes on the computer, and that I was later on observed to check my e-mail instead of taking notes. I immediately asked my manager why she used the word to "accommodate", she was left speechless and changed subject. I believe that if the word was innocently used, she would have had no problem explaining how it was fitting the context. This came after a light-up back and forth exchange where she wasn't winning much of the argument so I do believe she talked too much in the pressure of the moment. I might be wrong though.

Maybe she fumbled because she was surprised that you asked why she used a certain word?

I'm typically the guy that gets along with everybody and engages everybody in conversations. I noticed a change in attitude from management after I made my Dexedrine claim. They were setting traps, and interpreting performance data in a very negative way, although the data was good enough to leave a lot more than the benefit of the doubt.
What kind of traps?

They were trying to say that my performance was well below my colleagues, however, since I was very popular and was asking my colleagues many questions, I had perhaps a more clear picture of where they were at than the managers themselves. It's very hard to tell a person who is helping many others complete their tasks, that they are doing bad.
Well actually, some employers look at that as someone who thinks they either know more than everyone around them, or are trying to avoid their own work but being in other people's business.

Whatever, it's like everyone was not my friend anymore.

Management or coworkers?

I'm honestly at a point where I'm no longer making benefit claims through my employer, fearing that they might fire me after they learn what medication I'm on. I was just wondering, in absence of a disclosure from my part, if they enter my medical file and find out that my medication treats a mental health issue, can the insurance company decide that I'm not insurable for my pay grade and request management to fire me?

Also are there any legal ramifications to this, if indeed I can prove they did this, are there any ways around it?
I am just playing devils' advocate above BTW.

I dont know the laws in Canada so I can only use the US in this regard. I dont know what to make of it, because on one hand it sure sounds like a coincidence or even paranoia and on the other hand its happened more than once. In the US we have HIPPA laws that protect patients from illegal access to medical records and medical information that can be accessed and used against a person-especially an employee. You have to sign a million forms saying you know what can and cant be accessed at a doctor's office and given written consent to the disclosure of your records-even to the insurance industry.
I dont know how you find out but Google can help. I google stuff with certain key words and names and get lucky all the time. I joke that I should be a researcher.
Try googling your insurance company name and key words for patient privacy, bill of rights, employer notification and and do the same with the name of your employer. See what pops up. Also see if certain meds are flagged or if there is some kind of implied consent. Mental health records tend to be more protected then others so I dont know if its the same where you are.

Postulate
01-30-17, 01:29 PM
Thank you for your reply Sarah. Traps like interpreting social, non-professional situations from a professional and serious perspective. Situations like playing organized games in class where we were encouraged to behave in a non professional way by the trainer herself for the purpose of the game. It was brought up, along with many similar details.

Bottom line is I felt I was getting uncalled for push-back, all of a sudden, without me triggering any incident or making job mistakes beyond what could be reasonably expected from a trainee in that particular stage of training. The trainer would make comment on the color of the highlighter I was using to study my notes and complaining about it. One time a colleague heard her comment and came to see me confused, asking what that was about.

Little Nut
01-31-17, 11:37 AM
I was fired from two jobs

I'm also aware that me being paranoid about it

This came after a light-up back and forth exchange where she wasn't winning much of the argument

I'm typically engages everybody in conversations.

They were setting traps, and interpreting performance data in a very negative way

They were say that my performance was well below my colleagues

I was very popular and was asking my colleagues many questions

It's very hard to tell a person who is helping many others complete their tasks, that they are doing bad.

Everyone was not my friend anymore.

Parsed your OP. Alternate viewpoint based on your OP.


You're the new guy on the block.
You stop to chat w/ everyone and imply this is needed to learn/perform your job duties. Also you believe this is also assistance you are providing your co workers.
You engage in arguments w/ your boss and think you are actually able to "win" these arguments.
You refuse to accept that your performance needs to improve.
Your supervisor/manager counsels you on how to improve your performance. You in-turn take this as intentionally misinterpreting your performance in order to discharge you.
You coworkers that you talked with all the time and that you helped to do their jobs now are not your friends anymore.
You were fired from the previous 2 jobs for cause and you're working at getting fired from your current job.


If you want to get fired, but feel you tried your best, keep going. If you want to salvage your job;

Stop arguing. especially with your boss. Even if your boss is an idiot you will lose in the long run.
Whether you think your job performance is adequate or not, accept that you need to improve your performance to keep your job.
Tell your supervisor/manager that you want this job and are going to focus on performing your job well and to please point out any suggestions for improvement.
Stop casually talking to everyone.
When given/assigned a task find out AT THAT TIME when you are expected to complete it and resolve anything you don't understand how to do.
If you think you are being discriminated against start taking notes.
If you are abusing Dexedrine or other recreational aids to the point of paranoia, stop it.



Regards, LN

Postulate
01-31-17, 07:20 PM
What I find interesting is that I'm getting push-back from not one but two forum members in a topic where I'm talking about the push-back I got at work!

Thank you for your reply Little Nut, no offense I just had to name your account. Yes I was the new guy on the block, but believe it or not, my 9 colleagues were also new, and even my manager was new! It was a bulk hire strategy to expand a department. So since everyone was new we had a unique chance to form bonds and get to know each-other in a more friendly way.

Even-though socializing plays an important role in keeping the team morale up, I never implied that me socializing counted as assisting others. Assisting others is when I have to put my call on hold because my colleague doesn't know how to do something and I have to walk to his desk and show him. I also know the difference between job duties and lunch duties. I wanted that to be clear.

I do know I have to expand my skills and knowledge, I wouldn't use the word improve, I would use the expression 'expand my skills and knowledge'. Improve implies that you done bad and thinking that way doesn't help you steer towards success but more towards failure, you know, it's like when you drive, you steer and your car will go towards the tree you're looking at. I don't say this out of arrogance but out of optimism and self-confidence which are both skills employers look for. I also do understand there needs to be discipline in learning so that we don't become complacent, but naivety is not a good ingredient to this mix.

Also, it is only the managers who were not my friends anymore, my co-workers stayed good friends of mine until the end, and it is thanks to them that I knew most of what management was planning :)

I also cannot say that I'm working at getting fired from my current job because, quite the opposite, I give my best and this time I was awarded some bonuses quite a few times, so even paranoid as you say I am, when my boss tells me I did great, I'll take his word for it, for the time being, at least!

Also, when you say that you have to abuse Dexedrine in order to experience paranoid thoughts, you actually show that your knowledge is very weak, paranoid thoughts can arise in absence of Dexedrine and are also noticed on low to moderate doses. It's like any side effect such as anxiety. We are not talking about psychosis here, I think you're confusing it with that. I haven't gone at all that far and I do have ADHD.

Quite a beer you brew there man, not sure what to make of it.

Little Nut
01-31-17, 08:09 PM
What part(s) of your OP did I misrepresent by editing it for clarity? Those are your words.

Which conclusions that I drew from your OP are unreasonable based on the info from your OP?

Which suggestions are not appropriate to try to keep your current job, based on your OP?

No offense taken or intended on my part. Just talking TO YOU in both instances. -LN

Postulate
01-31-17, 09:00 PM
LT, the reason I made paragraphs in my last post was to supplement my lack of information as you bullet pointed it, not to challenge your misrepresentation, it's funny how you think. Except for the last part where you say I'm abusing my Dexedrine that I considered uncalled for, you generally gave quality feedback.

It's a good exercise actually, if they were never aware of my ADHD, then, this tells me that what might be bothering my bosses at work is mostly what I say, since on a forum, you cannot see or hear me, so it has to be my words. It's also quite a change talking to my fellow ADHDers, I guess the best way to see how people feel when talking to my ADHD self is by taking to one myself :)

Cheers mate!

acdc01
01-31-17, 09:29 PM
Wow. Are you sure your employer can even see what meds you yourself claim? I believe in the US HIPAA privacy laws make it so they can't (unless you're an extremely large company and are self-insured but I haven't ever known any company to self-insure).

Canada is very different from the US though so if you don't know the answer to this, you should look it up.

Postulate
01-31-17, 10:14 PM
Wow. Are you sure your employer can even see what meds you yourself claim? I believe in the US HIPAA privacy laws make it so they can't (unless you're an extremely large company and are self-insured but I haven't ever known any company to self-insure).

Canada is very different from the US though so if you don't know the answer to this, you should look it up.

To be honest I'm not sure. I have a friend who was fired and his employer told him that, for the pay grade of 33,000$, his anxiety disorder was not insurable. So he had an insurance issue and his boss was straight with him. I wish all were like that. On the other hand, 33k was much lower than what I was getting, and an anxiety disorder would cost more to insure then ADHD.

It would really upset me if it was just an insurance issue. Instead of firing me they could have told me not to make anymore claims and I would have stopped making claims. I guess.

ToneTone
01-31-17, 11:24 PM
Interesting ... in the U.S. employers only pay for insurance for things they are ok with ... So to say you used the employer insurance to get Dexedrine ... means the employer created a plan that approved use of Dexedrine ....

Even though you might get a card saying Insurance Company X, really your insurance is your particular company's choices and options ... the name of the insurance company on your card is just the company that administers the insurance ... So the fact that the coverage is there means the employer thinks the coverage is legit.

At least that's the way things work in the U.S.

Are you at a tiny company where some owner checks on how employees use insurance? ... I find it hard to believe that any big company would allow that ... managers don't have the right or authority to check on someone's medications ... people take Viagra and all kinds of stuff that they need privacy on ... I would bet money there are laws and strict rules blocking managers from accessing your health records.

And trust me: you probably aren't the only person at your company (if it's big at all) taking a stimulant.

Tone

meadd823
02-02-17, 01:00 AM
I am happy about having insurance through my employer

Accessing my chart is only allowed if some one is providing me health care. My bosses are not allowed to look in my chart unless they have a medical reason to do so .

Although I have employer sponsor health insurance the portion of the company that processes insurance claims and the part that supervises me as a health care worker are not the same entity

I know several of the doctors I have worked for know I am on Adderall because it is on my medication list and I have seen them as a patient but they are not supposed to discuss it with any one that does not need to know for health care reasons.

Accessing some one medical information for non-medical reasons is an offense that results in termination.

Some of it may be I have more access to their medical records than they have mine because I work directly in health care and even supervisors CEOs ect go to our doctors.

Working urology has taught me ADD is NOT the most embarrassing medical condition out there. :eek: