View Full Version : Anyone here also have working memory problems?


InterestedInPsy
02-02-17, 07:48 PM
Greetings. This problem relates to being able to store multiple things in your mind and keeping track of all it. Example of having good working memory would be when you are told to do dishes, vacuum, pick up kids at 4, and you have a dentist appointment at the same time and being able to not forget all of these points. It could even simpler like doing a math problem in your head (keeping track of added, subtracted, multiplied, and divided steps).

For me, this is one of my greater problems. People get mad at me for forgetting things. I forget my phone, music instrument, soccer shoes, important things I need.

Telling me multiple steps at once is a no either. I will most likely be able to do the first one or two, but the third one I will forget most of the time.

I also misplace stuff because of this since I forget where I placed it since I haven't stored it in my mind.

I started using a calendar with reminders probably about 6 months ago, which is good as long as I don't put if off before the reminder. I have downloaded this app that's like a game (EpicWin is the name of the app), which will let you set a due date. It will yell at you pretty much for you to complete it (I have gotten notifications every 15 mins at 3am before) if you are overdue by a few days. I also use a smart watch (Pebble), which really helps my life. It sends me my calendar notifications without having to check my phone. It's literally a life saviour. I have started making list, but if I don't have the list with me or remember I have made a list, then it's useless.

Anyways, what do you do to help with this particular issue? Thanks.

Fraser_0762
02-02-17, 07:59 PM
Yeah. Trying to store things to short term memory while I have other things going on, just doesn't happen. I was tested on this a while back. I was asked to remember 3 different words. I was then spoken to about other stuff for a minute or two, then I was asked to recall the 3 words. I think I remembered 1 of them!

It's the same with instructions. Things need to be written down and listed. But that's only the beginning. There's then the up hill struggle of just getting started on the tasks. I psych myself up which may help me to painfully get through the first task or two, but after that i'm done!

DJ Bill
02-07-17, 08:39 PM
I had the same 3 word test....when my last appointment for my refill came up. I was telling my doc that my short term memory is shot, so he did the "test"...I remembered one word right off, then after a minute or two the second, then another minute the third, finally. I was concentrating as much as I could and still felt like I was losing it.

After all that he said that my memory was typical for my age, not especially bad. (I'm only in my mid 50's dangit!)

At work I have to have everything written down or I don't remember it in the time it takes to climb up the stairs to where I do my actual work.

Mine is worse with stress, tiredness, or illness. I think my diagnosis is add inattentitive although this weekend I was approaching hyper with fast talking , etc.
The doc wrote down "attention deficit" only... for the diagnosis.

InterestedInPsy
02-10-17, 08:00 PM
My testing was different. I had to remember numbers in the order given, then backwards, then from lowest to highest number. I scored in the 16th percentile for the first part and in the 9th percentile for the second part. Somehow i did fine in the third part.

ToneTone
02-10-17, 09:45 PM
Weak working memory is a standard problem with ADHD.

20thcenturyfox
02-12-17, 01:16 PM
Sure, holding a list of things in my mind is no problem...as long as I don't try to do anything else. Grocery lists? I'm phenomenal...until I'm actually in the store.
To-dos? As long as I'm just drinking a cup of coffee, I'm fine...but once I actually start thinking about something THERE IS NOTHING SO IMPORTANT I CAN'T FORGET IT! I can totally forget about an event/appointment I have been looking forward to for weeks, even if it was at the forefront of my mind when I got up on the day of the event/appointment.

Of course, I had read that everyone has limited working memory, and ADHD'ers typically have additional impairments in working memory as well, so one of my New Year's resolutions was to come up with and implement some routines, systems, or visual aids to reduce the burdens I was placing on my poor WM and (amongst other things) guarantee that my phone is always charged and I always know where my keys are.

This has led me to start reading up on the various models and aspects of working memory and the various types of daily activities which put demands on it. And it turns out that the current leading model of WM goes way beyond holding a list of things in your mind.

It includes, for example, much of what we've been calling "executive function," that is, the planning, attention shifting, conscious action selection, inhibition of conditioned responses. It includes some more automatic processes such as the acquisition, selection and activation of routines, habits and various automatic "schema," not requiring conscious attention.

It includes a Phonological Loop where we temporarily retrieve, store, manipulate and rehearse short-term auditory and language material. It includes a Visual/Spatial sketchpad where we do all the equivalent temporary things with non-verbal material (including kinetic and tactile information) used in, say navigation or reading social cues. Plus an "episodic buffer" which pulls up information from long-term memory to compare with the other short-term stuff being held by the other parts of WM. In short, it includes most of what is the matter with me.

Considering that even the highest functioning WM is limited, and we can assume that most of us have suboptimal WM, learning all this is helping me understand how I abuse mine by overloading it unnecessarily. I'm trying to pare down the demands I put on my WM by consciously using more external aids such as calendar, lists, reminders, white board, phone apps, standardized routines and DIY pre-packaged or pre-selected clothing, meals, etc. One brilliant idea I got from ADHD Nerd is to cut down on the amount of "Morning Decision-Making Energy" required to get ready in the morning, by either automating them or making them the night before.

This is a painfully slow and detailed process BTW. But instead of heaping criticism and contempt on myself for my failings, this approach is really helping me have more compassion for myself. And a lot more respect for my poor overloaded Working Memory.

dvdnvwls
02-12-17, 01:26 PM
ADHD comes with working-memory problems. I don't think you can even have ADHD without that. I could be wrong.

Those deficits seem to affect each of us somewhat differently though.

stef
02-12-17, 01:34 PM
i have to write everything down i need to do ( in my own writing, not an app);
i have a terrible time with instructions, this is the worst part for me
; but i rarely would forget an appointment, its just looming in my mind until the day of it.
so hes different for everyone

Little Missy
02-12-17, 01:38 PM
i have to write everything down i need to do ( in my own writing, not an app);
i have a terrible time with instructions, this is the worst part for me
; but i rarely would forget an appointment, its just looming in my mind until the day of it.
so hes different for everyone

oh God, the looming appointments...months of the wonder :eek::confused:
I hate appointments.

I remembered the red pens this morning and that was my biggie for the day.

InterestedInPsy
02-13-17, 02:20 AM
ADHD comes with working-memory problems. I don't think you can even have ADHD without that. I could be wrong.

Those deficits seem to affect each of us somewhat differently though.

I was told that my working memory problems were caused by a learning disability. It's one of the main reasons why I believe I have AD/HD (specifically PI) instead of the LD. My diagnosis is an unspecified LD in working memory, visual memory, and fine motor skills. There isn't a lot of information about my LD online for me to find.

dvdnvwls
02-13-17, 03:48 AM
Have you seen a psychiatrist who specializes in treating ADHD?

InterestedInPsy
02-13-17, 02:28 PM
Have you seen a psychiatrist who specializes in treating ADHD?

I saw a psychiatrist at one point, but I was diagnosed with my LD by a psychologist. I don't know if she specialized in anything, but she does psychoeducational assessments to look for LDs and AD/HD probably more specifically. I also got my ASD diagnosis from her.

So I haven't seen a psychiatrist specializing in treating AD/HD.

dvdnvwls
02-13-17, 04:49 PM
So I haven't seen a psychiatrist specializing in treating AD/HD.
If you strongly suspect ADHD, that is your next step.

InterestedInPsy
02-14-17, 01:23 AM
If you strongly suspect ADHD, that is your next step.

That is my plan once I'm living on my own in the fall. I just am hoping it's not a lot of money since I will be going to university, plus I just a psychological assessment done less than a year ago (in April 2016) that was a lot of money.

Little Nut
02-15-17, 09:33 PM
Anyways, what do you do to help with this particular issue? Thanks.


I take AMPHETAMINES daily. Prior to this, excessive amounts of nicotine, caffeine, and self-induced stress on a daily basis.

Jeftheginger
02-15-17, 10:10 PM
Ummm...
I do not know what to say
I just had a great idea to tell you
But
I forgot.
So...
:)

Nelson1967
02-23-17, 08:29 PM
It's to much info in my case
ADHD is actually a problem with executive functions

Jenn1202
03-05-17, 12:56 PM
My short term memory doesn't work at all.

Letching Gray
03-05-17, 06:55 PM
I take AMPHETAMINES daily. Prior to this, excessive amounts of nicotine, caffeine, and self-induced stress on a daily basis.


Don't cha know! Me too.