View Full Version : Trouble getting Rx for higher doses


aur462
02-07-17, 09:28 PM
Do y'all have trouble getting ADHD meds at the dose you need?

I started taking Vyvanse and Adderall when I was living in ABQ and moved back to TX recently and first saw GP - no go on either med, but she referred me to a shrink. That doctor gave me almost my dose, but no cigar - I went out of network because the psychiatrists are abysmal in mine. I decided to go to an ADHD specialist clinic. I saw the doc last week and she prescribed 40mg of Dextroamp (extended release). This med kicks *** and takes names after 30 minutes or so, but after about 4-5 hours it wore off.

I haven't read the "stickies" so I'm not sure that revealing your dosage is permitted, but I'm curious to hear from those who take the "non-FDA" dose and whether it was a pain in your posterior to get a Rx.

Extraneous, but perhaps useful/insightful info:
Vyvanse used to work ok for me, but I don't feel much from it anymore. This could be stress - I went back to college after 20 years a few weeks ago. In any event, Adderall IR (haven't tried XR) is MUCH more effective.

The ADHD doc (my most recent doc visit and only one to her) said that if I don't have enough free dopamine, the medicine will not have the desired effect. I have comorbid anxiety and depression at times, which is what she was referring to and I am impenetrable to any treatment for this, save for the right dose of stimulant. Have tried all SSRI's and negligible outcomes at best. I question the doc's (relatively young} contention. Based off my "Genomind" profile I supposedly have the gene which is chock full of dopamine naturally. Two questions arise from her low dopamine claim: if you're depressed or have dysthymia, do you have low dopamine necessarily? The best explanation I've heard for depression (though certainly may be limited. That brain thing is kinda complicated you know?) is that it's a miscommunication between the lymbic system and the prefrontal cortex; the effect on neurotransmitters would be a side effect of this. My 2nd question regarding this would be, since I have "superior" dopamine in my prefrontal cortex (again, according to Genomind), does that preclude me from having low dopamine?

I'm going to google research some of these questions, but if anyone has any input on my "dopamine" question or the original Rx question, I would like to hear your thoughts.

Little Missy
02-08-17, 11:17 AM
This med kicks *** and takes names after 30 minutes or so, but after about 4-5 hours it wore off.

WTH does that mean?

sarahsweets
02-08-17, 04:59 PM
Do y'all have trouble getting ADHD meds at the dose you need?

I started taking Vyvanse and Adderall when I was living in ABQ and moved back to TX recently and first saw GP - no go on either med, but she referred me to a shrink. That doctor gave me almost my dose, but no cigar - I went out of network because the psychiatrists are abysmal in mine. I decided to go to an ADHD specialist clinic. I saw the doc last week and she prescribed 40mg of Dextroamp (extended release). This med kicks *** and takes names after 30 minutes or so, but after about 4-5 hours it wore off.

I haven't read the "stickies" so I'm not sure that revealing your dosage is permitted, but I'm curious to hear from those who take the "non-FDA" dose and whether it was a pain in your posterior to get a Rx.

Extraneous, but perhaps useful/insightful info:
Vyvanse used to work ok for me, but I don't feel much from it anymore. This could be stress - I went back to college after 20 years a few weeks ago. In any event, Adderall IR (haven't tried XR) is MUCH more effective.

The ADHD doc (my most recent doc visit and only one to her) said that if I don't have enough free dopamine, the medicine will not have the desired effect. I have comorbid anxiety and depression at times, which is what she was referring to and I am impenetrable to any treatment for this, save for the right dose of stimulant. Have tried all SSRI's and negligible outcomes at best. I question the doc's (relatively young} contention. Based off my "Genomind" profile I supposedly have the gene which is chock full of dopamine naturally. Two questions arise from her low dopamine claim: if you're depressed or have dysthymia, do you have low dopamine necessarily? The best explanation I've heard for depression (though certainly may be limited. That brain thing is kinda complicated you know?) is that it's a miscommunication between the lymbic system and the prefrontal cortex; the effect on neurotransmitters would be a side effect of this. My 2nd question regarding this would be, since I have "superior" dopamine in my prefrontal cortex (again, according to Genomind), does that preclude me from having low dopamine?

I'm going to google research some of these questions, but if anyone has any input on my "dopamine" question or the original Rx question, I would like to hear your thoughts.

I wouldnt rely on any sort of genetic typing for medication. Not enough science yet to back it up.

Little Missy
02-08-17, 07:33 PM
This med kicks *** and takes names after 30 minutes or so, but after about 4-5 hours it wore off.

WTH does that mean?[/QUOTE]

What does that mean???

Lunacie
02-08-17, 08:15 PM
This med kicks *** and takes names after 30 minutes or so, but after about 4-5 hours it wore off.

WTH does that mean?

I thought the OP was saying that Dextroamp kicks in fairly quickly and works
very well, but doesn't last nearly long enough for an extended release med.

aur462
02-09-17, 11:31 PM
I wouldnt rely on any sort of genetic typing for medication. Not enough science yet to back it up.

Yeah, I know it's not gospel. Not enough studies. I believe most/only studies have been done by the company itself, but I've read articles that give anecdotal evidence of it having some benefit. Hopefully this will be tested and perfected in the years to come. It would have saved me 15 years of useless SSRI's - essentially all of them.

I do like the benefit of having it. I can say that it does "have it right" in 2 or 3 classes of meds I've tried. This lends credibility at least.