View Full Version : Just Started - weird side effects? Anyone else experience these?


jec1123
02-18-17, 02:08 AM
Hi! Brand new to site. I've been testing out Adderall and now Ritalin as part of my treatment for depression - under care of a psychiatrist. I started these "trials" about a month ago. Adderall didn't seem to do anything to increase my motivation/drive. Ritalin seems to help a bit but I have some side effects that I want to see if anyone else has experienced.
1) migraines
2) sweating (esp at night)
3) occasional numbness in hands
4) irregular periods (this one is really concerning as I've been onthe pill with clockwork periods for over 15 years!)
5) sleepiness (sometimes sudden)

Some of these may have nothing to do with the meds and that is what I'm trying to figure out. Any feedback would be so appreciated. Thanks!

Fraser_0762
02-18-17, 09:34 AM
Stimulants won't treat depression. They help to boost concentration, but they won't eliminate the fed up/bored feeling associated with being depressed.

The main line of treatment for depression are SSRIs (Seletctive Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors)

Has your psychiatrist prescribed any anti depressants for you in the past?

Swissy
02-18-17, 11:10 AM
I disagree. Stimulants can help depression, I have experienced this myself. when a stimulant can successfully help you get your act together it will alleviate anxiety and depression associated with ADD type symptoms. My adderall definitely feels like an antidepressant to me! I experienced most of what you are experiencing when I started meds a few months ago. I reduced my dose by 1/2 and increased as s/e symptoms went away. I am up to my recommended dosage now with few (if any) s/e. Good luck!

Swissy
02-18-17, 11:24 AM
Ps- make sure you drink plenty of water and eat (as stimulants may suppress appetite.) when I start feeling headachy and tired, I eat and feel re-energized.

sarahsweets
02-18-17, 11:33 AM
Stimulants won't treat depression. They help to boost concentration, but they won't eliminate the fed up/bored feeling associated with being depressed.

The main line of treatment for depression are SSRIs (Seletctive Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors)

Has your psychiatrist prescribed any anti depressants for you in the past?

This isnt true. Off label use of stimulants have been around awhile:

Methylphenidate is a commonly prescribed psychostimulant and works by increasing the activity of the central nervous system.[12] It produces such effects as increasing or maintaining alertness, combating fatigue, and improving attention.[13] The short-term benefits and cost effectiveness of methylphenidate are well established.[14][15] Methylphenidate is not approved for children under six years of age.[16][17] Methylphenidate may also be prescribed for off-label use in treatment-resistant cases of bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder.[18]


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Methylphenidate

There is also evidence that amphetamines have been used too.
There are also studies being done on provigil for treatment resistant depression and parkinson's disease.

Fraser_0762
02-18-17, 11:58 AM
Stimulants are not a long term treatment option for depression. The elevated mood effects of stimulants will only work in the short term and lead to deeper depression in the long run. They are not intended to be used for mood enhancing purposes.

In fact, prescribing stimulants for the purpose of lifting depression is dangerous, as the withdrawal associated with stimulant use will only intensify those emotions in the long run.

I wouldn't say this unless I was absolutely sure that this was the case.

sarahsweets
02-18-17, 01:26 PM
Stimulants are not a long term treatment option for depression. The elevated mood effects of stimulants will only work in the short term and lead to deeper depression in the long run. They are not intended to be used for mood enhancing purposes.

In fact, prescribing stimulants for the purpose of lifting depression is dangerous, as the withdrawal associated with stimulant use will only intensify those emotions in the long run.

I wouldn't say this unless I was absolutely sure that this was the case.

What makes you certain? Your experience isnt scientific proof.

Here a very very thorough pub med link:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3181580/

But let me highlight a few points:
dextroamphetamine and ritalin have been used since the thirties to treat severe cases of treatment-resistant depression, especially in the presence of prominent fatigue and apathy, and psychostimulants are now well established as an adjuvant therapy. This article reviews the literature on the use of psychostimulants in treatment-resistant depression and discusses the findings relative to therapeutic efficacy, side effects, and frequency of dependency from a retrospective study carried out in 65 patients of our hospital treated with psychostimulants.

One feature of particular interest is that the response to amphetamines may be predictive of the therapeutic effect, of tricyclic drugs in depressed patients, since both types of drugs have similar mechanisms of action (rapid for the amphetamines, slower for the tricyclics) involving an increase in free norepinephrine levels.19 In contrast, the response to methylphenidate does not appear to be predictive of antidepressant efficacy.26

Some depressive disorders remain refractory to treatment despite intensive antidepressant therapy with adequate dosages and even combinations of antidepressants.43,44 These cases may benefit from adjuvant treatment with psychostimulants. The mood-elevating effects of the tricyclics, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), and monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) usually only manifest, after 10 to 12 days. Side effects and drug interactions are quite common with these drugs. Although psychostimulants themselves are not as effective as conventional antidepressants,45,46 they have the dual advantage of a more rapid onset of action and of inducing a lower rate of adverse events.



authors, however, reported no evidence of waning of effect in depressed patients treated with 5 to 60 mg methylphenidate for up to 1 year.24 Tolerance was seen only in relation to effects like hyperthermia, hypertonia, and anorexia, but not psychomotor stimulation.31,34,35


.38 Most studies, however, report, little or no dependence in depressed patients treated with amphetamines (see overview in refs 2 and 23). Psychostimulants may be withdrawn after several weeks of treatment without any danger of recurrence of depression


These sources are well reviewed. I dont know what it is you are certain of but the OP deserves to know he is not barking up the wrong tree.

Swissy
02-18-17, 02:21 PM
Stimulants are not a long term treatment option for depression. The elevated mood effects of stimulants will only work in the short term and lead to deeper depression in the long run. They are not intended to be used for mood enhancing purposes.

In fact, prescribing stimulants for the purpose of lifting depression is dangerous, as the withdrawal associated with stimulant use will only intensify those emotions in the long run.

I wouldn't say this unless I was absolutely sure that this was the case.

Again, I am living proof this is not true.

Kidwho158
02-27-17, 09:50 AM
Hi, I have been taking Ritalin for about 4 years or more I think. And the migraines are normal I get them once at month at least. I Have Aspergers and it helps me focus in school. But the sweating and migraines are normal. the sleepiness that could just be how it acts on you. But If you take it in the morning you might feel your heart racing or it might feel like it is. but I've been taking
Ritalin since I was in the 4th or 5th grade and I am in 9th grade now and those things still happen except the Period thing Because I am a boy. but what your experiencing is normal.

RJV1989
03-14-17, 09:05 PM
I notice sweating with my Ritalin, 10mg 3 times a day.

dvdnvwls
03-14-17, 10:41 PM
Sweating is not particularly weird - it's a well known side effect. It just doesn't happen to everyone.

dolophine
04-06-17, 07:36 PM
Ritalin gives me terrible sweats, makes me feel highly aggravated. I go around wanting to like attack anyone who mouths off to me on Ritalin. I also get a bad side-effect in higher doses that feels like cocaine psychosis. I start looking out the windows and seeing "shadow-people'. lol. For me the side-effects feel like really crappy long-acting cocaine and I absolutely despise cocaine and would never put that in my body.

justoutlols
06-07-17, 12:31 AM
Stimulants are not a long term treatment option for depression. The elevated mood effects of stimulants will only work in the short term and lead to deeper depression in the long run. They are not intended to be used for mood enhancing purposes.

In fact, prescribing stimulants for the purpose of lifting depression is dangerous, as the withdrawal associated with stimulant use will only intensify those emotions in the long run.

I wouldn't say this unless I was absolutely sure that this was the case.

I think this goes to individuals experience with the given stimulant. I find myself(with this short experience) being very positive when watching positive videos, more upset when watching sad videos, so point I'm trying to say is that I think it depends on your environment you're at, like it boosts the emotion you'll feel. If you had bad experience I'd imagine it could potentially make it feel worse. And util function says to counter one bad experience you'll need two good.

disasimile
06-09-17, 03:47 AM
Hmm, yes, so headaches are fairly common. Almost all meds can have headaches as a side-effect from a variety of things, like blood pressure changes, CNS changes, muscle cramps etc.

Sweating is common-ish and is due to the sympathomimetic properties of methylphenidate. Basically, fight-flight response, and why some people break out in to cold sweats when encountering terrifying situations! But also, it can increase your core body temperature, which results in feeling feverish and sweating.

Now, the numbness and tingling in the fingers I get as well! It's also called Raynaud's. Although I've had it before medication, after medication, it's definitely gotten worse. And this is again due to the sympathomimetic properties of Ritalin. What happens, is that your blood vessels shrink in diameter and the amount of blood that can flow to your extremities is reduced (vasoconstriction of peripheries). This poor circulation can make your fingers and toes seem cold and numb.

Irregular periods I've always had, but I've found them worse on methylphenidate as well. I'm not quite sure if it is a registered side-effect or not. I know that for me, it probably affects my weight and that would affect my period. If I were to propose a mode of action, I would theorise an effect on cortisol levels, either due to peripheral adrenal effects or centrally acting hypothalamic influences.

Can't help with the drowsiness. A fairly common side-effect, often psychological (as your mind may relax more, allowing you to sleep more easily), often physiological (sympathomimetics are tiring for some).

Anyway, stimulants could theoretically help with motivation (dopaminergic pathways), but wouldn't that motivate some people who are depressed in the opposite direction? Well, it does, sadly, and studies show it, too. Personally, since whenever I take Ritalin, it's like a mood-stabiliser for me (doesn't make me particularly happy or sad and can level me out), I can't imagine it for mood elevation, but that doesn't mean that it won't help. Actually, I can definitely see how it can help, but yeah, it just dulls me down most of the time.

Without my meds, I watch these videos and get very emotional, regardless of what it's about. I get happy, angry, frustrated, upset, excited at the blink of an eye. With my Ritalin, it feels as if all those moods are extremely mild and I can think rationally and behave in slightly more socially acceptable ways. I do sometimes wonder if that means that if I tried an antipsychotic, I'd really bounce off in all directions? (Ironically).

Amphitrite
06-12-17, 06:13 PM
The only side effects I get are the sweating (when I'm physically active) and diminished appetite in the first one or two hours after taking my methylphenidate. Mind you, I said "diminished" and not no appetite at all or aversion to food. I haven't had problems with headaches, insomnia, high BP, anxiety etc.
I started taking Concerta 54 mg (generic) a few months ago but it wasn't doing much, so I asked my doctor to put me on Ritalin (generic) instead and thankfully she agreed. I'm on 45 mg a day (30 in the morning and 15 at noon) at the moment but I intend on asking her to up my dose a bit because I turn into my usual ADD self in the evenings.
I believe I am severely deficient in dopamine (considering my mental health throughout the years and my complete failure education, career and social-wise).

sarahsweets
06-13-17, 01:21 PM
Anyway, stimulants could theoretically help with motivation (dopaminergic pathways), but wouldn't that motivate some people who are depressed in the opposite direction? Well, it does, sadly, and studies show it, too. Personally, since whenever I take Ritalin, it's like a mood-stabiliser for me (doesn't make me particularly happy or sad and can level me out), I can't imagine it for mood elevation, but that doesn't mean that it won't help. Actually, I can definitely see how it can help, but yeah, it just dulls me down most of the time.
Can you explain this more?

With my Ritalin, it feels as if all those moods are extremely mild and I can think rationally and behave in slightly more socially acceptable ways. I do sometimes wonder if that means that if I tried an antipsychotic, I'd really bounce off in all directions? (Ironically).

What do you mean? Do you mean that you think antipsychotics cause people to behave in more acceptable ways? And do you mean because you think drugs might have the opposite effect for people with adhd, that you would end up getting hyper and all that from them?
Antipsychotics are poorly understood by most people. They are not just for the truly psychotic or scziophrenic persons. They are used very often for bipolar and other mood stabilizers. Seroquel and Risperdone are two antipsychotics that are often used for sleeping issues. I take Geodon which is considered to be an atypical antipsychotic and its mostly for mood stabilization.