View Full Version : My Daily Adderall Routine


lntense
02-21-17, 05:44 PM
I'll go over my routine throughout the day to maybe give some of you an idea of what may possible help aid with the dreaded comedown and lack of motivation/energy following.

Keep in mind I only take my 20mg of Adderall XR 3 times a week, being M-W-F unless I need to present or speak in front of a lot of people, so that it may delay me building any sort of a tolerance. I focus on those days to get the majority of my tasks and goals achieved.

Morning: 6-7am

I blend shake consisting of 1 cup of egg whites, 1 cup of oats, 1 banana, and a big handful of spinach/kale(for the nutrients and the pH benefits.


Supplements
1 20mg Adderall XR
2 Fish Oil - 300mg Omega 3's total
2000mg of Vitamin D3



Noon: 12-1pm

Lunch consisting of chicken and rice usually, with a veggie.

Supplements
CoQ10
some L-Glutamine
1 baby aspirin 81mg


Afternoon: 4-6pm

Another meal with 45g Pro, 40g Carbs, 10-15g of healthy fat from olive or coconut oil, and this is where I take my "comedown" supplements.

Supplements
L-Tyrosine
2 more fish oil
50mg magnesium
1000mg of Vitamin C

I inject vitamin B so I typically only take 2-3 shots of this a week. It's much more bio-available than when taken orally.


Evening: 8-10pm

I typically hit the gym to lift weights around this time unless I work out during my lunch break.


Another shake, usually egg whites and around 30g of low GI carbs. Oats usually, and some fruit like frozen blueberries.


Supplements:
5htp
melatonin(1 week on 1 week off)
Taurine
Zinc 50mg
Magnesium 200mg


That with the addition of working out usually has me more than ready for sleep.


Maybe try some of this out and see if it helps you.

More than ANY supplement, proper nutrition/hydration is key. I aim for a gallong or more of water a day, lots of leafy greens, healthy carb sources, healthy fats, and enough protein from good sources for 1g per 1lb of lean mass.(Unless you're trying to lose weight of course, in which you would want to lower the carbs and fats).


This limits any sort of crash for me and leaves me without developing tolerance to the meds.

Snoopy10
02-23-17, 08:52 AM
Does l-tyrosine keep you awake at night? I wanted to try taking it after my Adderall IR wears off around 4:00. I go to bed around 9:00pm.

lntense
02-24-17, 04:40 PM
Does l-tyrosine keep you awake at night? I wanted to try taking it after my Adderall IR wears off around 4:00. I go to bed around 9:00pm.

No not at all(for me). Especially if you're going to be taking it around 4pm.

PaulCamR
02-28-17, 02:37 AM
Here is what I don't understand: Why do people take L-Tyrosine as a supplement?

1 egg has 240mg of L-Tyrosine. Any protein source has L-Tyrosine. It's a cheap supplement, but it's in every protein source you eat pretty much.

N-Acetyl Tyrosine is different, but I never found any conclusive information about it. The body breaks it down more in the digestion process, so tyrosine levels in the blood are increased less gram-for-gram in comparison to L-Tyrosine, but N-Acetyl forms of supplements are designed to cross the blood-brain barrier more easily (so blood-tyrosine levels may not be a conclusive way to look at N-Acetyl Tyrosine).

Long and short is... L-Tyrosine supplementation. Placebo? Probably? It's in everything you eat already, in abundant quantities. If you were vegetarian or had a strange diet I could see a reason. Maybe I'm missing something. Most preworkout supplements use N-Acetyl Tyrosine over Tyrosine. The idea in preworkout supplements is to put cheap ingredients on the label to make the product seem fancy. The testing of preworkout supplements is all anecdotal and highly subjective. But the subjective testing says that it gives you more energy. Studies aren't there to back anything up.

One last thing: Studies that say that L-Tyrosine does this or that aren't untrue. You could skew a study to show that Vitamin C helps with attention too, but that's based on not having any in your regular diet (same as with Tyrosine studies). You get it from your food! If you did a study on people who eat no protein, and one group is given L-Tyrosine, there'll be a big difference. But if you did a study on those who eat protein normally, L-Tyrosine supplementation would do nothing.

lntense
05-16-17, 12:12 PM
Here is what I don't understand: Why do people take L-Tyrosine as a supplement?

1 egg has 240mg of L-Tyrosine. Any protein source has L-Tyrosine. It's a cheap supplement, but it's in every protein source you eat pretty much.

N-Acetyl Tyrosine is different, but I never found any conclusive information about it. The body breaks it down more in the digestion process, so tyrosine levels in the blood are increased less gram-for-gram in comparison to L-Tyrosine, but N-Acetyl forms of supplements are designed to cross the blood-brain barrier more easily (so blood-tyrosine levels may not be a conclusive way to look at N-Acetyl Tyrosine).

Long and short is... L-Tyrosine supplementation. Placebo? Probably? It's in everything you eat already, in abundant quantities. If you were vegetarian or had a strange diet I could see a reason. Maybe I'm missing something. Most preworkout supplements use N-Acetyl Tyrosine over Tyrosine. The idea in preworkout supplements is to put cheap ingredients on the label to make the product seem fancy. The testing of preworkout supplements is all anecdotal and highly subjective. But the subjective testing says that it gives you more energy. Studies aren't there to back anything up.

One last thing: Studies that say that L-Tyrosine does this or that aren't untrue. You could skew a study to show that Vitamin C helps with attention too, but that's based on not having any in your regular diet (same as with Tyrosine studies). You get it from your food! If you did a study on people who eat no protein, and one group is given L-Tyrosine, there'll be a big difference. But if you did a study on those who eat protein normally, L-Tyrosine supplementation would do nothing.


The body produces tyrosine from phenylalanine, but some people aren't as efficient at doing so. VERY rarely is someone deficient in tyrosine BUT getting additional amounts of this nutrient in your diet or from supplements can increase levels of dopamine in the brain.

N-Acetyl L-Tyrosine is actually the form I use, it is a little pricier but much more soluble.

If it is competing with other amino acids, your body is not going to absorb it as well. So take it on an empty stomach for the most benefit.

I get plenty from food so I know I am not deficient, as I get 4-6 eggs a day. But with my adderall use my dopamine is not what it should be. So I still experience benefit from taking tyrosine on an empty stomach. It seems to be even more noticeable the next day.

Gypsy Willow
05-17-17, 10:56 AM
So is it better to take Zinc at night?