View Full Version : Is this ADD?


smiley1
02-25-17, 05:18 PM
Hi All

I have received a letter from my sons doctor saying they think he might have ADD, it has come as a bit of a shock.

Background.
My son was first referred when he was 5 due to a medical professional spotting some behaviors in him (he thought it could be ASD), questionnaire sent to school they reported no issues so problem put down to parenting. He is now 9 and I had him referred again as no improvement in issues again letter sent to school who reported no issues. This time the doctor sent in an independent specialist to monitor him at school and the next thing I know letter arrives on doorstep possible ADD?

He does shows some of the traits
very disorganised
never sleeps (past 1am every night) he just can't turn off
Still has toileting issues at 9
Problems with dressing will ask him to get dressed, he go upstairs and forgets. when he does dress he forgets something or clothes are on back to front
Have to tell him things at least five times and watch him do everything to make sure its done (teeth cleaning. washing etc) otherwise he will get distracted and do something else.
fidget all the time so many things get broken, not on purpose he just fidgets with them too much / takes apart to see how they work


Other issues that I don't think are ADD related
Very limited bland diet, he is so fussy he wont even eat anything if it has been cooked the wrong way, very sensitive to what he perceives as brunt even thought its not. I believe this is a texture issue.
Never wears clothes inside, always takes then off once he get in (very annoying when we need to go back out as it takes half an hour to get him to put them back on again)
Unable to form his letters correctly gets them back to front, He can do it right as somethings it is right, sometime wrong often in the same sentence or even word, He reading is fantastic he loves to read.
frequent tantrums (although never at school)
Hates a change of routine, this causes great upset and tantrums.
Extremely low self esteem
Only has one friend, the others st school don't like him but he wants to be friends with everybody.

I thought he was on the autistic spectrum, not ADD.

The main reason I never suspected ADD was he is a very sensitive child, he would never hurt anyone. Most of the ADD/ADHD children you see on the TV can be violent towards others (I realise this isn't their fault) but this just isn't my child. He also can manage to stay in his seat (not at home but outside of home he can), not still he fidgets but he doesn't keep getting up and running around like ADD/ADHD children. He is also very bright, although this doesn't come through at school, I have read that children with ADD/ADHD tend to be on the less intelligent side. He is also shy (to strangers talks non stop to me) I don't understand how a shy child can have ADD the two to me don't seem to go together.

Just wondered if those with child(ren) who have this think my son has it or that it could be something else/or nothing just parenting. I am well aware that to have this he needs to show the behaviours more that just in the home setting.

Sorry that was a really long first post, congratulations if you have got this far. I am scared as the letter came with a leaflet about medication I don't want to put my some on medication if the diagnosis is wrong.

Fraser_0762
02-25-17, 06:23 PM
ADHD is often stereotyped as the hyperactive child that can't sit down for longer than a few seconds. However, there is far more to ADHD than that and the issues you describe are common problems for many with ADHD who may not display any hyperactive symptoms at all.

Also, ADHD has nothing to do with a persons intelligence. There are highly intelligent children and adults out there with ADHD.

ADHD doesn't prevent a person from being intelligent, it can however hinder their ability to apply their intelligence when it requires a great deal of mental effort or focus.

Medication is only one option in a wide range of treatment options for ADHD. Even if your child tries medication and it doesn't work out for him, there is no long term damage.

dvdnvwls
02-25-17, 08:41 PM
I believe the chance of all these things being "just parenting" is very very close to zero.

On the surface, this list does not sound to me like ADHD. It may be that ADHD is part of what's going on, but it doesn't come close to covering all that you've mentioned.

Autism seems a much more plausible suggestion, but I don't know enough to say that with any great confidence.

It can be a combination of things.

I have ADHD, and I was the top student in my high school.

Lots of shy people have ADHD.

sarahsweets
02-26-17, 03:33 AM
I dont know, some of those things remind me of Asbergers.

Johnny Slick
02-26-17, 10:14 AM
I dont know, some of those things remind me of Asbergers.
I agree, and furthermore spectrum disorder is very, very often comorbid with ADHD, so if it's that it's probably both. The stuff like the limited diet and the tantrums scream spectrum disorder to me though.

dvdnvwls
02-26-17, 01:42 PM
I dont know, some of those things remind me of Asbergers.
... and Asperger's is now classified as part of autism, not a separate thing.

Lunacie
02-26-17, 06:07 PM
I agree that it's very possible your son has both ADHD (possibly primarily
inattentive type) and some form of Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Teachers are not trained medical professionals and tend to dismiss symptoms
in boys with inattentive type and all girls. My granddaughter was 10 before
any of her teachers would even fill out a questionaire, but at that point the
home room teacher was seeing the signs. Finally DX with severe ADHD.

ADHD is also a spectrum disorder so some may have very high intelligence
while others really struggle, and of course most are somewhere in between.

I highly recommend you do lots of reading about both disorders, especially
ADHD-PI (primarily inattentive). A great source for information is YouTube
videos by Dr. Russell Barkley.

And do checkout the sticky threads at the top of the parenting section here
on this forum, there is a wealth of great information there.

smiley1
02-26-17, 06:35 PM
Thanks all

I have been reading alot on this forum from real people who have ADHD and that has been far more helpful to me that the websites/tv programs that seem to stick to the worse case scenarios.

The more I read on here the more i think he could have it. I also believe there could be some sort of sensory processing disorder as well however I don't see any benefit to getting more than one diagnosis? I am expecting the school to be more understanding and helpful with a diagnosis, I don't think whether that is one of two will make a difference?

I suspect it is the same where ever you live but in the UK it is extremely difficult to get a diagnosis for anything. My concern is if I question the ADHD outcome too much they might say ok its not that but stop the investigation and we are back to square on with no hope of anything.

I have a dilemma, is any diagnosis better than none? (even if it might not be quite the right one) as far as I can tell most disorders have common traits and cross overs so does it really matter what the actual diagnosis is, its the fact it leads to help (I hope) which is the main thing?

Caco3girl
02-27-17, 12:45 PM
Thanks all

I have been reading alot on this forum from real people who have ADHD and that has been far more helpful to me that the websites/tv programs that seem to stick to the worse case scenarios.

The more I read on here the more i think he could have it. I also believe there could be some sort of sensory processing disorder as well however I don't see any benefit to getting more than one diagnosis? I am expecting the school to be more understanding and helpful with a diagnosis, I don't think whether that is one of two will make a difference?

I suspect it is the same where ever you live but in the UK it is extremely difficult to get a diagnosis for anything. My concern is if I question the ADHD outcome too much they might say ok its not that but stop the investigation and we are back to square on with no hope of anything.

I have a dilemma, is any diagnosis better than none? (even if it might not be quite the right one) as far as I can tell most disorders have common traits and cross overs so does it really matter what the actual diagnosis is, its the fact it leads to help (I hope) which is the main thing?

Well i think everyone would agree that the correct diagnoses is preferable, but not always plausible the first time around and especially with someone so young. Sometimes these things are trial and error. I do know that if I took my sons ADHD meds they would have a totally different affect than when he takes them because my brain isn't wired like his. Often times medication and how they affect people is one way they diagnose, it isn't the preferred way, but it is one way.

sarahsweets
02-27-17, 02:46 PM
... and Asperger's is now classified as part of autism, not a separate thing.

Cut me a little slack. My sister who is 27 was diagnosed aspergers when it was a new thing and all her life its what we've said, and she told me she will never call it anything else. I try to remember that its all part of the spectrum but its tough.

dvdnvwls
02-27-17, 03:00 PM
Cut me a little slack. My sister who is 27 was diagnosed aspergers when it was a new thing and all her life its what we've said, and she told me she will never call it anything else. I try to remember that its all part of the spectrum but its tough.
You get all the slack you want, plus extra. I don't care what it's being called this year, I just don't want anyone to be confused by what they hear or read, on the forum or elsewhere.