View Full Version : School Assessment - School sees nothing wrong?!


Danibee
02-27-17, 11:25 AM
Hi all. I joined the forum a week or so ago. I've been doing a bunch of reading and learning. Thank you all for all your experiences and advice.

My 9-yr old daughter was diagnosed with ADHD about a month ago, and started on medication last weekend. We started the ball rolling before she was diagnosed as far as getting assessed by the school district. She was in MTTS Tier III in ELA at the time, with no improvement.

I received a call this morning from the School Psychologist (SP) administering the evaluation. She wanted to know if my daughter had taken an assessment test before because she seemed to know the material. She had very few informal questions from our Psychologist, but no "testing".

Problem now is that the SP tells me that so far all the testing puts her in the "normal" range. She even said she's "solid".

I know my daughter has a severe problem with her ADHD. Among many other areas in her life, it has affected her schooling (she is currently failing ELA and Science in 3rd grade and has struggled in previous years).

What happens if the school comes back showing no deficiencies?

Caco3girl
02-27-17, 12:52 PM
She has a history of being Tier III, they already have identified deficiencies.

My son tested as "average" in ALL the schools testing as well. It turns out the ranges are:
>85% = Gifted
84-16% = Average
<15% = Severely disabled.

I'm not joking, there was zero categories between severely disabled and average! So, my son was in the 19th percentile for reading comprehension and that made him average!

The report wasn't enough to get him an IEP, however, the report showing he was on the lower end in multiple things, the standardized tests showing he wasn't performing at grade level, his downward spiral with grades over the years, and the doctors diagnoses of ADHD was enough to get him an IEP as otherwise health impaired.

By the way, my son scored in the 99th percentile for spatial relations...he is outstanding at math, but it didn't mean other areas weren't WAY below expected parameters.

Hiddencreations
02-27-17, 02:15 PM
Does the school psych know that she recently started medication?

I think even if the scores are average, the school would take the position that even with tier 3 interventions there is a large discrepancy between potential and current functioning due to ADHD. It's not as if she has caught up to grade level with those scores, those scores are her cognitive abilities/potential, so I think she would still qualify.

sarahsweets
02-27-17, 02:36 PM
This is my copy and paste from another thread with bolded lines added by me.
[quote]
Here is what I had to do and it worked.
First I read up on PRISE. Then I wrote a letter to formally request in writing that my child be evaluated by the child study team/special services/whatever your school calls those that do the testing.(in your case you can make this letter disputing the results and requesting proper or additional testing) I explained why and included copies of the psychiatrists report. I also cited some of my specific rights according to my state in the letter and acknowledged that I was well aware of these rights and my child's right to a free and appropriate education. I sent these letters to the school, the principal, guidance counselor, school board and superintendent.
I sent them all certified usps with return receipt. I also informed them that they have 60 days to do theses evaluations and that I would be checking in weekly to hear about the process and progress.(you may have to find out the specific length of time if different from an initial eval.) EVERYTHING has to be in writing, with proof that you sent it, and that they received it.

Having the school board involved made it clear that from now on, everyone was going to have the same knowledge and documentation.

When the time came for the meeting to go over the results...yes meeting, not a letter saying no or yes, I brought a child advocate who knew all the laws. She was 60$ and hour and I only needed her that one time. The school knew who she was and knew they were in for it when I walked in with her. She did all the "arguing" and advocating, and simply put-she shut them down.
They knew there was no point because I had brought in an expert-who would not get emotionally out of hand.( you may need to call another meeting if you have already had one, or call a formal meeting to discuss results and stuff like that, but not on the phone. You are not required to accept their determination with no meeting.

Its horrible and ridiculous that it has to be this way- but special education and related serviced costs them more money-money that they would rather use to enhance the sports teams or whatever-and schools who think a child may be able to squeak by would rather push them through, then spend more money than their precious budget allows for these services. Not my problem. Not your problem either. I never had to fight for anything for my kids again after that.
__________________

ajaxblu
02-27-17, 02:51 PM
OP - I am in a similar boat. I still don't know what to do but the people on these forums have been so gracious in reaching out to give advice. All of the advice here is helpful but one piece I would forward is to hire an advocate who knows what they're talking about to show you the right things to do/say to get better results and to go with you to the meetings.

Danibee
02-27-17, 03:24 PM
Thank you all for responding. To be fair, we haven't attended the assessment review meeting yet. My post was based upon what the School Psychologist conveyed to me over the phone. Since my super hero power is jumping to conclusions in a single bound, I'm trying to get prepared for a fight. Unfortunately, the meeting isn't scheduled until April 11th. I don't have ADHD, but even to me that sounds like a lifetime away!

This brings up another question though - what do I do in this "intermediate" stage? I can't see stressing her out by doing the same thing we've been doing in the past (hours of homework each night often ending in frustration and tears). It seems like this school year is already a wash, so why push her to do things that I know she can't achieve on her own? <--- WOW, that's such a "quitter" mentality. I promise, I'm not a quitter. I think many of you can understand what I'm asking....

She feels like a failure, and just needs to feel good about herself and about her school performance. It seems like the harder we work to try to help her study, the worse she feels about herself when she gets such bad grades. The main pressure is the weekly spelling test. 20 words (which are definitely above her level). They get the words on Monday, and take the test on Friday. The best she has scored all year is an 80% which was a one-time-only. We studied 1 hour each night for her to achieve that. Typically she's in 50-60% range. Then we have to fit in 30 minutes of reading each night along with a reading log. Add to this math homework, occasional science...

Sorry, I'm rambling.

dvdnvwls
02-27-17, 03:54 PM
"Being a quitter" is simply what intelligent people do when there's no point in continuing something.

"She's not a quitter" is an insult. It's the same as calling someone pigheaded; it just sounds nicer.

Caco3girl
02-27-17, 04:03 PM
Thank you all for responding. To be fair, we haven't attended the assessment review meeting yet. My post was based upon what the School Psychologist conveyed to me over the phone. Since my super hero power is jumping to conclusions in a single bound, I'm trying to get prepared for a fight. Unfortunately, the meeting isn't scheduled until April 11th. I don't have ADHD, but even to me that sounds like a lifetime away!

This brings up another question though - what do I do in this "intermediate" stage? I can't see stressing her out by doing the same thing we've been doing in the past (hours of homework each night often ending in frustration and tears). It seems like this school year is already a wash, so why push her to do things that I know she can't achieve on her own? <--- WOW, that's such a "quitter" mentality. I promise, I'm not a quitter. I think many of you can understand what I'm asking....

She feels like a failure, and just needs to feel good about herself and about her school performance. It seems like the harder we work to try to help her study, the worse she feels about herself when she gets such bad grades. The main pressure is the weekly spelling test. 20 words (which are definitely above her level). They get the words on Monday, and take the test on Friday. The best she has scored all year is an 80% which was a one-time-only. We studied 1 hour each night for her to achieve that. Typically she's in 50-60% range. Then we have to fit in 30 minutes of reading each night along with a reading log. Add to this math homework, occasional science...

Sorry, I'm rambling.

You aren't rambling and I don't think you are a quitter. Last year my daughter was in first grade, she hasn't been formally diagnosed with anything yet but I suspect dyslexia, and ADHD. We had those 20 words as well and the crying and the fighting and frankly 20 spelling words wasn't worth the relationship with my daughter and I told the teacher we would no longer be doing them....seriously I was THAT fed up.

The teacher surprised me by giving her a modified homework sheet with 10 much easier spelled words and the reading assignment was about half as challenging. She also said to set a timer and only work for 20 minutes per night. If she only got 3 words done in that time frame that was fine, but ONLY work for 20 minutes. I was shocked but SOOO grateful!

My daughter is in Tier III interventions this year but her teacher last was awesome. Have you tried talking to your daughters teacher?

Danibee
02-27-17, 05:04 PM
My daughter is in Tier III interventions this year but her teacher last was awesome. Have you tried talking to your daughters teacher?

Yes we did. She's, how did my husband put it, oh yea - a Cranky Old Bat. I haven't officially told her that we're done with the spelling tests.

It would be a good idea to only work on 10 of them. If she gets a 50% then in essence she'll get 100%! That's a great idea to still have her work, but not have all the stress! I'll try that starting tonight and see how it goes then let her teacher know. Thanks!!

I hope your daughter is having a good year this year as well!

sarahsweets
02-28-17, 06:34 AM
Why April? Is that 60 days from the dates of formal testing or when you requested the testing?

Caco3girl
02-28-17, 09:00 AM
Yes we did. She's, how did my husband put it, oh yea - a Cranky Old Bat. I haven't officially told her that we're done with the spelling tests.

It would be a good idea to only work on 10 of them. If she gets a 50% then in essence she'll get 100%! That's a great idea to still have her work, but not have all the stress! I'll try that starting tonight and see how it goes then let her teacher know. Thanks!!

I hope your daughter is having a good year this year as well!

LOL we have the cranky old bat this year....thank goodness my daughter gets pulled out half the day for reading. Things will get better next year or maybe the year after when we can have her formally tested. She is just really starting to understand the word sounds and read at a low level. Testing right now wouldn't do any good.

Danibee
02-28-17, 10:46 AM
Why April? Is that 60 days from the dates of formal testing or when you requested the testing?

Signed the formal request on 2/3/17. Let's see, that's hhmmm... 67 days. Guess I'll be making a call to request a sooner meeting. Or, do you think the extra 7 days aren't worth possibly me getting on their bad side?

Caco3girl
02-28-17, 03:10 PM
Signed the formal request on 2/3/17. Let's see, that's hhmmm... 67 days. Guess I'll be making a call to request a sooner meeting. Or, do you think the extra 7 days aren't worth possibly me getting on their bad side?

Is the school open 5 days a week during that time? If they are closed for a week you can make that a 65 day window.

Danibee
02-28-17, 04:54 PM
Hhmmm... good point. I'm going to leave the date at the 11th. If they **** me off between now and then, I'll think about bringing it up. Always nice to have something tucked away in your back pocket!

Hiddencreations
02-28-17, 08:00 PM
Federal law states 60 days, which if nothing is put before it in the state regulations, it is assumed to mean 60 calendar days. However, FL state regs allow for 60 school days, which means that the only days that count are the days that the school is opened. So, I imagine that you have President's Day off and also Spring Break in there, so that may account for why the meeting is happening at 67 weekdays, but really it was only 60 school days.

The school is probably pushing it to the latest possible date allowed by state regulations.

aeon
02-28-17, 08:05 PM
Schools, for good reason (if not helpfully) try to deny, put off, and ignore, any kind of special need as long as they can.

For reasons of budget (it costs them money), and for reasons of a system that functions best with homogeneity, no outliers, and one where no one not normative is helped at all, because the system is based on ideals and results-on-standardized-metrics, not on the needs of human beings, and best practices to the health, well-being, and development of said human beings.

---

School tried to kill my love of learning, but they failed, and I won, because I survived with my curiosity intact, despite their will to cure me of my habit of asking questions and finding out why. :)

But school did make an autodidact out of me, to the degree I was not one when I first went to one.


Cheers,
Ian

Danibee
03-02-17, 02:42 PM
Thanks everyone. I'm learning the process as I'm experiencing it. I'm just now able to get more info and research on my own so I can arrive to the Review Meeting knowledgeable.