View Full Version : Weaning off Adderall, Help Please :)


#addprobs
02-28-17, 08:43 AM
I am a 26 year old female and have been prescribed Adderall for about 8-10 years now however I have recently found myself worrying about how it could affect me in the long run. I'm about 5'7" and 160 pounds and have been on a 20 mg, 3 times a day dose for about 5 years. The dose amount seems to work well for me but I can tell I have built quite the tolerance. I am in sales and have to travel some for work and sometimes on my longer days when I'm up from the crack of dawn and not getting home until 10 pm or later I find myself having take an extra 1 or 2 to stay on task and get through the day. I would not say that I'm addicted to Adderall, but I'm very dependent. On the weekends, days off, or days that are not long/busy I do just fine with only taking 1 or 2. There's been many times I have thought it was time to start weaning myself off the drug to eventually become adderall-free. But that's easier said than done.

Within the past year my boyfriend and I have began talking about taking the next steps, which is another reason I'm wanting to get away from the Adderall dependency. I know engagement, marriage, getting to live together, and starting a family is in my near future. I've worked so hard establishing myself to get to this point in life and I don't want the effects of a stupid little pill to ruin what I've worked towards. I've always dreamed of having a beautiful family and I want to be a mommy more than anything in the world, but I don't want to depend on Adderall to raise my family and I know that's the path I'm currently heading down.

With saying that though I'm still having a hard time cutting the cord from my prescription. Don't get me wrong, I'm still a very happy and bubbly girl when I go a day(s) without but I personally like myself more when I've had my daily dose. I feel more in tune socially and very studious in my grad classes and work. I know deep down that with time I could overcome the daily obstacles of staying on task and keeping a clear mind but I'm very passionate about my career and succeeding and I've always had Adderall to help push me through and keep up the go-getter mindset.

I have such a desire to break free and be independent from the drug. I most definitely don't want to continue through my entire adulthood depending on Adderall. I want to prove to myself that I'm capable of being just as accomplished on my own. As I said earlier I'm starting to fear the longevity of it and how it could turn my life the wrong way in the future. Does anyone have an advice or similar experience breaking the barrier? I've talked to my doctor here and there about it but I'd rather hear about others experiences than my doctors medical terminology on it. It's very important to me that I prevent such issues before one arises.

sarahsweets
02-28-17, 09:37 AM
I am a 26 year old female and have been prescribed Adderall for about 8-10 years now however I have recently found myself worrying about how it could affect me in the long run. I'm about 5'7" and 160 pounds and have been on a 20 mg, 3 times a day dose for about 5 years.
What worries do you have? The science supports the idea that adderall can be taken long term.

The dose amount seems to work well for me but I can tell I have built quite the tolerance. I am in sales and have to travel some for work and sometimes on my longer days when I'm up from the crack of dawn and not getting home until 10 pm or later I find myself having take an extra 1 or 2 to stay on task and get through the day.
Alot of times this can be psychological not physical. That is something that can be overcome with strict persistence- its not always easy, but its possible.


I would not say that I'm addicted to Adderall, but I'm very dependent. On the weekends, days off, or days that are not long/busy I do just fine with only taking 1 or 2. There's been many times I have thought it was time to start weaning myself off the drug to eventually become adderall-free. But that's easier said than done.

A lot of people confuse the two. Addiction involves repeated consequences usually and it involves a lot of illicit ways in obtaining said substance, lying, manipulation and guilt.

Within the past year my boyfriend and I have began talking about taking the next steps, which is another reason I'm wanting to get away from the Adderall dependency. I know engagement, marriage, getting to live together, and starting a family is in my near future. I've worked so hard establishing myself to get to this point in life and I don't want the effects of a stupid little pill to ruin what I've worked towards. I've always dreamed of having a beautiful family and I want to be a mommy more than anything in the world, but I don't want to depend on Adderall to raise my family and I know that's the path I'm currently heading down.

Well I guess that means I am dependent on adderall to raise my family? I have three kids and a husband all with adhd including myself. At one point or another, all of us have been on meds. The older kids decided one day they didnt like the way they felt on stimulants and stopped them, the younger one never took them, and husband has narcolepsy and takes medication for that now. I would say I have an awesome family and I think I do a good job with the kids, although maybe I am a poor self evaluator and others would chime in and say otherwise. But I still think Ive done ok. My son started meds when he was 4 and is 21 now and my middle daughter just turned 17 and passed her driver's test. The youngest is 13. I just turned 42 (yikes!) and I have been medicated for over 15 years.

Medication saved my life, I am safer, more available emotionally and physically and am a better parent with medication. I am who I am and my personality and the way I parent is not hampered by medication and I dont think its at all a negative part of my life. What makes you think that being a wife and mom would be bad if you were medicated? It sounds like you are buying into medication misinformation TBH. And not for nothing but the decision to take meds is yours alone, and truly your BF doesnt really get a say. Not trying to be harsh I am just passionate about this subject.


With saying that though I'm still having a hard time cutting the cord from my prescription. Don't get me wrong, I'm still a very happy and bubbly girl when I go a day(s) without but I personally like myself more when I've had my daily dose. I feel more in tune socially and very studious in my grad classes and work. I know deep down that with time I could overcome the daily obstacles of staying on task and keeping a clear mind but I'm very passionate about my career and succeeding and I've always had Adderall to help push me through and keep up the go-getter mindset.

The messages people with adhd are given encompasses things like- "try harder, buckle down, you can do it, you are a failure, etc." And how do you know time will somehow change the way your brain operates. Maybe you can do it for a time but what happens when it doesnt work out? The its time for guilt, shame and self loathing. Personally I wouldnt want that to happen to me when my solution has always been a legally prescribed medication for a legitimate medical/psychological condition.

I have such a desire to break free and be independent from the drug. I most definitely don't want to continue through my entire adulthood depending on Adderall. I want to prove to myself that I'm capable of being just as accomplished on my own. As I said earlier I'm starting to fear the longevity of it and how it could turn my life the wrong way in the future.
I guess I am confused as to what the 'wrong way" would be for you? What are the negatives that you currently experience because of adderall? And where does this desire come from? Is it from you or from what you have read and heard from other people?


Does anyone have an advice or similar experience breaking the barrier? I've talked to my doctor here and there about it but I'd rather hear about others experiences than my doctors medical terminology on it. It's very important to me that I prevent such issues before one arises.
I am still unsure as to what issues you are trying to prevent? Its very hard to prevent something that isnt guaranteed to happen.

Little Missy
02-28-17, 09:59 AM
Wait and see how well your boyfriend loves the Adderall-less you. It'll be a shocker.

aeon
02-28-17, 11:08 AM
ADHD is for life.

So my meds are too.

I already “proved” I could do without it...what a cluster****.

Trying to avoid the dependency of meds when one is ADHD is like
a paraplegic avoiding the dependency of a wheelchair and proving
they can do it by crawling on the ground and dragging their lower half.


Cheers,
Ian

PaulCamR
02-28-17, 09:50 PM
ADHD is for life.

So my meds are too.

I already “proved” I could do without it...what a cluster****.

Trying to avoid the dependency of meds when one is ADHD is like
a paraplegic avoiding the dependency of a wheelchair and proving
they can do it by crawling on the ground and dragging their lower half.

Cheers,
Ian

I'm still developing an opinion around ADHD.

Disabilities affect people on different levels. It is possible to be more affected by ADHD than someone else, just like it's possible to be more affected by paralysis, or by autism. Add in the fact that someone can be affected by more than one disability, add in the fact that each disability has different sub-components that can all vary, and add in the fact that everyone is a unique individual, and well... many of the 'right' answer(s) end up sitting in a grey area.

I would imagine some people who have ADHD require medication always. Others might not require medication always?

I think I sit in a funny place. I am affected by APD (auditory processing disorder), and ADHD. Like anyone else, I can't pin down every problem and cleanly define where one issue ends, and the other begins. I think I will always need to have access to ADHD medication, but I don't think I will always need my ADHD medication.

Maybe I'm being too optimistic about a future of choice, regarding medication. I imagine if conditions in my life become less demanding, I might be able to take breaks. I certainly feel I don't need medication if I were on a vacation, for example. However, being 27 and just beginning medication, I can't speak on this matter with absolute confidence.

aeon
02-28-17, 11:17 PM
I'm still developing an opinion around ADHD.

Disabilities affect people on different levels. It is possible to be more affected by ADHD than someone else, just like it's possible to be more affected by paralysis, or by autism. Add in the fact that someone can be affected by more than one disability, add in the fact that each disability has different sub-components that can all vary, and add in the fact that everyone is a unique individual, and well... many of the 'right' answer(s) end up sitting in a grey area.

I would imagine some people who have ADHD require medication always. Others might not require medication always?

I think I sit in a funny place. I am affected by APD (auditory processing disorder), and ADHD. Like anyone else, I can't pin down every problem and cleanly define where one issue ends, and the other begins. I think I will always need to have access to ADHD medication, but I don't think I will always need my ADHD medication.

Maybe I'm being too optimistic about a future of choice, regarding medication. I imagine if conditions in my life become less demanding, I might be able to take breaks. I certainly feel I don't need medication if I were on a vacation, for example. However, being 27 and just beginning medication, I can't speak on this matter with absolute confidence.

I think what you said is absolutely fair, and balanced and reasonable at that.

That said, it doesn’t take away from what I said, and as it concerns taking meds, I spoke for myself only, and I well appreciate that others’ experience varies, according to their need.

My comment on dependence, though, is universal. People are dependent on all manner of things, and that is a simple statement of fact, and not a judgment of their person in any way. For some, it is glasses, for some, insulin, for some, a wheelchair, for some, their ADHD meds. Trying to go without those things, for whatever reason, when they are in fact needed, isn’t a virtue or any proof of character.

And because ADHD is, by definition, defined by situational experience, it is only natural to consider that the consequences of impairment, and need for medication, may change as one’s situation changes.

I don’t think you are being too optimistic about a future of choice. You seem open and level-headed, and not in any hurry to come to a conclusion before you’ve had more experience upon which to base lines of thought and potential conclusions...ones relevant to your situation, need, and well-being.

And for sure, what is “right” is personal, and there’s a whole lot of grey out there obscuring that flashing neon sign that reads “truth!”


Cheers,
Ian