View Full Version : Head injuries


Fuzzy12
02-28-17, 09:13 PM
This has got nothing to do with adhd. I just need some reassurance that I haven't wrecked my little girl.

Little Fuzzling banged her head against the side of her cot. I made her sit up while playing with her but she isn't stable yet so she slowly slid to the side. She didn't fall from high or anything like that but there was quite a thud.

I don't know how I could let that happen or be so stupid to make her sit in the cot. I know I am an idiot (etc).

Anyway she seemed fine. Didn't even cry. Didn't seem dazed either. She just continued playing. At first I didn't worry too much but then it suddenly hit me: SHE'S BANGED HER HEAD!!!

Anyway so I took her to the hospital where they checked her over, waited for an hour and then checked her again. They said t
She seems perfectly fine and I should just monitor her.

I'm still freaking out of course. There's no visible injury. No bump or even a bruise. She was as alert and active as always. She was actually in a pretty good mood.

Is it still possible that she could have sustained any internal damage? Is it possible that there could be any long term damage or consequences?

She's just 6 months.

In the hospital they just took her vital stats and checked her visually. No scans.

:(

:(:(:(

aeon
02-28-17, 09:41 PM
Is it still possible that she could have sustained any internal damage? Is it possible that there could be any long term damage or consequences?

Damn you for asking open-ended questions. :umm1:


She got checked out, and is fine. If there was a problem, it would present itself, and without much delay. Yes, she is fine.

I know I am an idiot (etc). Your head is absolutely filled with things that are unkind to yourself, but that doesnít make you an idiot, not by a long shot, and Fuzzling is fine, and not in spite of your shout-it-from-the-rooftops unfit-to-be-a-motherness that you seem all to willing to profess and confess.


I got my bell rung as a child. When your bell is rung, it is obvious something is wrong...it doesnít go unnoticed (even if it does go unattended to), and it isnít something a child could hide, even if they wanted to.

TLDR; Fuzzling is fine, and so are you. :)


Cheers,
Ian

Lunacie
02-28-17, 09:59 PM
I see questions about this all the time in my local mom's facebook group.
Babies are actually pretty hard to break. If there was no bruise or swelling,
then it probably wasn't much of a bump. The thing to watch out for is whether
the pupils in their eyes are the same size and tracking movement well.

But going to the doctor the first time it happens can be reassuring.
So please be reassured, Lil Fuzzling didn't suffer any permanent damage.

dvdnvwls
03-01-17, 12:23 AM
In broad general terms, but still pretty accurate, babies just are not injured by this type of bump. They don't have either the strength or the momentum to make it happen. Injured babies are pretty much either victims of very nasty ugly accidents, or of violence by bigger people.

Caco3girl
03-01-17, 10:20 AM
I see questions about this all the time in my local mom's facebook group.
Babies are actually pretty hard to break. If there was no bruise or swelling,
then it probably wasn't much of a bump. The thing to watch out for is whether
the pupils in their eyes are the same size and tracking movement well.

But going to the doctor the first time it happens can be reassuring.
So please be reassured, Lil Fuzzling didn't suffer any permanent damage.

This is the total truth, they truly are very hard to break. The younger the child the harder it is to break them.

When my daughter was 5 years old she fell off her dad's shoulders and smacked the back of her head on concrete. She was not okay. She had blurred vision and made very little sense when I spoke to her and she tried to respond. An ambulance ride later, with lots of throwing up, and she was diagnosed with a 4 inch fracture in her skull...a FRACTURED SKULL!!!!!

I was thinking she would have to wear a helmet and this may affect her growth, her development, her everything! the doctor said keep her out of gym class for two weeks and follow up with her pediatrician in two weeks. THAT'S ALL! I must have questioned him 10 times about "what else, surely that can't be ALL"...he said "Kids heal on their own, and they do it quickly. If I take another scan in 6 months you won't even see the fracture, she will be fine."

Kids really are hard to break.

aeon
03-01-17, 12:07 PM
Kids really are hard to break.

The physicality of their bodies, yes.

The thresholding, homeostasis, and modulation of their nervous systems?
Thatís quite a bit easier to break.

Their sense of self, emotional well-being, ability to form healthy relationships?
Thatís easy to break. We even have good science on what you have to do (or not, as the case may be) and how long it takes...about 6 months.

And when you break them that way, they do not heal, and you cannot put their pieces back togetheróthey are not just changed, they are broken, for all the rest of their lives.

The fact the flesh heals so quickly and so well gives rise to the illusion that children are hard to break.

Nothing could be further from the truth.

The idea that children are hard to break it is a cultural lie that assuages our collective guilt over children being run roughshod over, neglected, abused, and regarded as property and prey by those who came before them.


Suffer the Little Children,
Ian

Fuzzy12
03-01-17, 12:17 PM
Thanks guys. She still seems fine today. Pupils normal size and tracking everything.

I just keep imagining that in a few years she will be imaged because she still can't talk or gets bad headaches and then they'll find a brain lesion and ask if she ever bumped her head as a baby
Or something like that. ...:umm1:

Lunacie
03-01-17, 02:16 PM
Thanks guys. She still seems fine today. Pupils normal size and tracking everything.

I just keep imagining that in a few years she will be imaged because she still can't talk or gets bad headaches and then they'll find a brain lesion and ask if she ever bumped her head as a baby
Or something like that. ...:umm1:

When my daughter was 3 or 4 (my memory sucks) she was trying to shinny up
a support post in a basement and fell, whacking her head on the cement floor.

That was 40 years ago and the only reason she gets headaches is because there
is a family history of migraine disorder. It's natural to worry the first time
anything happens to your first baby. But the odds are that your daughter is
just fine and will continue to be just fine.

Caco3girl
03-01-17, 03:25 PM
Thanks guys. She still seems fine today. Pupils normal size and tracking everything.

I just keep imagining that in a few years she will be imaged because she still can't talk or gets bad headaches and then they'll find a brain lesion and ask if she ever bumped her head as a baby
Or something like that. ...:umm1:

FYI, my daughter who cracked her skull at age 5 is now almost 8 and she doesn't get headaches, or seem to have any ill side affects. She's actually very into tumbling now and if there is an open area of more than 5x5 feet she will do several cartwheels and roundoffs or do a cheer from her squad.

When it comes to physical harm the younger they are the more like rubber they are. I can't tell you how many times I have watched my kids do some amazing athletic thing and I'm thinking...yup...that would have broken me and laid me up in a hospital for at least a month!:scratch:

Fuzzy12
03-01-17, 04:58 PM
The physicality of their bodies, yes.

The thresholding, homeostasis, and modulation of their nervous systems?
That’s quite a bit easier to break.

Their sense of self, emotional well-being, ability to form healthy relationships?
That’s easy to break. We even have good science on what you have to do (or not, as the case may be) and how long it takes...about 6 months.

And when you break them that way, they do not heal, and you cannot put their pieces back together—they are not just changed, they are broken, for all the rest of their lives.

The fact the flesh heals so quickly and so well gives rise to the illusion that children are hard to break.

Nothing could be further from the truth.

The idea that children are hard to break it is a cultural lie that assuages our collective guilt over children being run roughshod over, neglected, abused, and regarded as property and prey by those who came before them.


Suffer the Little Children,
Ian

I worry about her emotional well being as well, her development and if I'm capable of equipping her with the resources she needs to be happy and healthy... at least for a large portion of time. Well most of the time I'm just hoping that I won't screw her up too much. ...

Yes we know some about what it takes to build a healthy and emotionally well human but there's so much we don't know. There's so many decisions every day where I absolutely don't know the right answer and can't find it anywhere either. The simplest thing seems like a lever to her current and future wellbeing...or lack of.

Babies aren't tough. Not even physically. Certainly they aren't tougher than adults or older children. Their immune system is immature. Their digestive system doesn't work properly yet and don't even get me started on their skin.

I don't know about their skull. I hope it's thick enough to withstand all the bumps it will get in the near future. Once she learns how to sit up or crawl she'll keep banging into stuff I guess. :scratch:

Lunacie
03-01-17, 08:28 PM
Just for clarity, I didn't write that babies are "tough." I wrote that they are hard
to break. Most accidents won't break them.

Fraser_0762
03-01-17, 08:37 PM
Being a baby is honestly the best time to bump your head. :)

Defence and recovery rate is vastly superior to that of a fully grown adult.

Fuzzy12
03-01-17, 08:37 PM
Just for clarity, I didn't write that babies are "tough." I wrote that they are hard
to break. Most accidents won't break them.
I know what you guys meant and thanks for reassuring me and sharing your stories. Fuzzling still seems fine so I guess I csn relax now a bit.

My post was in response to aeon' post...partially.

Mostly I just meant thst im really surprised st all the health issues fuzzling has got. Before she was born I mainly worried about her mental health and what crap she might inherit from me. It's come a bit as a shock to the system how many health problems such a little thing csn have. Maybe this is common. At least with every issue that pops up we are told that it is really common among bsbies. Maybe it's because I'm really quite healthy and robust physically and I assumed she would be as well.

But caco your girl is one tough cookie. Glad she's ok!! It's good to know that babies are sturdier than I thought.