View Full Version : Addicted to Eating


traze23
03-02-17, 10:12 PM
I can't stop eating responsibly or with moderation and I am scared the problems it could cause. I literally can't control myself and it has been the same way for 20 years. Sugar is the worst problem. I can't drink one cup of soda and stop....it has to be three or four.

So I made a goal to stop during soda for a year and I accomplished that but it turned out to be a bad idea because after that one year I started during again and went bananas. Ever since I started drinking again(6 months ago)I have gained 50 pounds.

Eating healthy is important but I think my biggest issue is moderation. If I go on a diet and eat only healthy food, what would I do when my job has a pizza party or has barbecue? Say no to free food? Or practice eating just one or two slices or one plate of barbecue. I prefer the latter but I can't stay with just one pizza or plate b/c I can't control it.

dvdnvwls
03-03-17, 04:30 AM
There are a lot of possible methods or techniques out there that could help people achieve moderation of certain foods without completely eliminating them. Instead of looking for "the right solution" - which never existed anyway - try to find a "Works For You" solution.

Fuzzy12
03-03-17, 04:40 AM
I have the same problem. Especially with sugar. It's supped to be fairly addictive anyway. I forgot the exact mechanism but basically the more sugar to have the more sugar you crave.

I think most adhders struggle with moderation anyway. I've often found it actually easier to just cut out a type of food (eg I was off chocolates for 6 years or so) than to limit it but that's really difficult with sugar.

If soda is the main culprit could you swear off thst again? There is nothing healthy in soda so you don't really miss anything.

If you crave something sweet to drink maybe go for pure fruit juices or smoothies. Or even better sparkling water perhaps with a dash of lemon.

dvdnvwls
03-03-17, 05:06 AM
Nutritionally, most bottled fruit juice is hardly better than soda. Not that the juice is so bad, just it doesn't have much to recommend it.

acdc01
03-03-17, 06:59 PM
I think different things work for different people but here's something I found for myself.

I found that if I ate something sweet but healthy in the morning, I wasn't as tempted to eat something else that was sweet and unhealthy. Like I eat chia seed with either a tiny bit of honey, brown sugar, or maple syrup in the morning with some sweet fruit mixed it. It doesn't take much sweetener to make the Chia pudding sweet like a dessert so overall, it's a very healthy dish.

I find in general, eating something sweet but healthy when I'm craving something that's sweet but unhealthy really helps to lessen the craving.

I have that workplace problem too. Cold turkey is the only way for me to handle it. But it's a social thing at work and I seem unsocual if I don't participate.

Fuzzy12
03-03-17, 07:17 PM
Nutritionally, most bottled fruit juice is hardly better than soda. Not that the juice is so bad, just it doesn't have much to recommend it.

Yes that's probably true.

Would probably be better to go for fresh fruit then.

dvdnvwls
03-03-17, 07:33 PM
Yes that's probably true.

Would probably be better to go for fresh fruit then.
Exactly.

traze23
03-04-17, 11:40 PM
It makes me wonder what they do to help drug addicts stop taking whatever they are addicted to. I need the same treament because its a really strong craving/urge for sugar, fast food, etc.

sarahsweets
03-06-17, 05:32 AM
It makes me wonder what they do to help drug addicts stop taking whatever they are addicted to. I need the same treament because its a really strong craving/urge for sugar, fast food, etc.

From the perspective of an alcoholic in recovery, the only thing that worked for me was abstinence and behavior changes. Not just stuff like avoiding bars or whatever, but learning to cope without alcohol or use it for mood enhancement and to develop other coping skills. It helps me to be with other alcoholics that do the same thing but that sort of way doesnt work for everyone. I used to have an unheathly relationship with food and be really overweight. I used certain tools that permanently altered my weight, and had to relearn how to eat both in the choices I made and quantity.

stef
03-06-17, 05:50 AM
Have you considered making your own meals?
I hate to cook but quality food, can be amazing

Google foods you like, but always type in "easy" first

Curry for example, can be just onion, curry powder, ginger and coconut milk.

(I have an addictive personality but not a food addiction; I just feel better with these recent changes)

Fuzzy12
03-06-17, 09:31 AM
It makes me wonder what they do to help drug addicts stop taking whatever they are addicted to. I need the same treament because its a really strong craving/urge for sugar, fast food, etc.

I have the same problem. I just had 7 slices of toast. 7!! And I could have had more.

I just thought of something else.

I'm always fairly tired these days. Sleeping more is not an option for me so I eat for energy. Works like a charm but yeah. ..7 slices of toast. :umm1:

Do you get enough sleep? Have you tried sleeping more? Maybe that will help a bit.

7 or 9. I'm not sure anymore. :eek:

I.love bread. Even toast :doh:

aeon
03-06-17, 11:42 AM
I can't stop eating responsibly or with moderation and I am scared the problems it could cause. I literally can't control myself and it has been the same way for 20 years. Sugar is the worst problem. I can't drink one cup of soda and stop....it has to be three or four.

If you cant control yourself, there is nothing more to be done.

My sense is you are asking this because a part of you knows this is not true, and that you can control yourself, but you do not know how, and right now, do not want to.

But that want to take control is getting stronger.

You will have to accept responsibility for, and ownership of, your choices first. Only when those things are yours are they something you can control.

As long as you believe I literally can't control myself, nothing can be achieved.

How/why/what/how much you eat is entirely up to you.

Id certainly recommend a professional assessment, both for the consequences of eating and associated changes in weight, as well as the psychological issues that may inform your choices.


Cheers,
Ian

Hermus
03-06-17, 02:41 PM
It makes me wonder what they do to help drug addicts stop taking whatever they are addicted to. I need the same treament because its a really strong craving/urge for sugar, fast food, etc.

For drug addicts just as for overeaters there are a number of different options:

One option is rehab. In a good rehab they focus on the way the addiction manifests itself, but also on the underlying issues. A lot of addicts have problems such as trauma, low self-esteem, moodswings, dual diagnosis etc. that are at the root of their addiction and at the same time often reinforced by their addiction. A good treatment program should focus on those issues as well.

A second option is ambulatory treatment. In my case they do a lot of the same things as in rehab. Except that people come in at morning and go home at night.

A third option are Anonymous meetings. As there is Alcoholic Anonymous for alcoholics and Narcotics Anonymous for drug addicts, for food addicts/overeaters there is Overeaters Anonymous. This is a program based on 12 steps that help people stay sober and develop themselves.

Finally, another option that I am exploring besides the other three options is following the spiritual path. I do daily meditation and regularly go to meditation groups. This helps strengthen my recovery by giving my life focus. Other forms of spirituality might provide the same benefits.

Probably there are more options, but these are the ones I tried and that work for me.

Little Missy
03-06-17, 02:54 PM
If you cant control yourself, there is nothing more to be done.

My sense is you are asking this because a part of you knows this is not true, and that you can control yourself, but you do not know how, and right now, do not want to.

But that want to take control is getting stronger.

You will have to accept responsibility for, and ownership of, your choices first. Only when those things are yours are they something you can control.

As long as you believe I literally can't control myself, nothing can be achieved.

How/why/what/how much you eat is entirely up to you.

Id certainly recommend a professional assessment, both for the consequences of eating and associated changes in weight, as well as the psychological issues that may inform your choices.


Cheers,
Ian

A well-tailored Hanibal Lector mask works wonders. I suppose jaw-wiring could work.

Postulate
03-06-17, 03:48 PM
I can't stop eating responsibly or with moderation and I am scared the problems it could cause. I literally can't control myself and it has been the same way for 20 years. Sugar is the worst problem. I can't drink one cup of soda and stop....it has to be three or four.

So I made a goal to stop during soda for a year and I accomplished that but it turned out to be a bad idea because after that one year I started during again and went bananas. Ever since I started drinking again(6 months ago)I have gained 50 pounds.

Eating healthy is important but I think my biggest issue is moderation. If I go on a diet and eat only healthy food, what would I do when my job has a pizza party or has barbecue? Say no to free food? Or practice eating just one or two slices or one plate of barbecue. I prefer the latter but I can't stay with just one pizza or plate b/c I can't control it.

I would do a bit of introspection to determine if my eating habits are dopamine driven or psychologically driven, with some subconscious reminiscence from childhood.

I read a report on a psychiatric patient, female, about 250lb, who thought she had a food addiction. Her psychiatrist discovered that she was eating, not because she liked to eat, but, her layer of grease was a protective shield against infidelity...towards her father. Since no man had touched her, the psychiatrist discovered the psychological incest with her father which was responsible for her weight problem.

These cases can sometimes go pretty deep.

Lizzie80
03-06-17, 04:34 PM
I can't stop eating responsibly or with moderation and I am scared the problems it could cause. I literally can't control myself and it has been the same way for 20 years. Sugar is the worst problem. I can't drink one cup of soda and stop....it has to be three or four.

So I made a goal to stop during soda for a year and I accomplished that but it turned out to be a bad idea because after that one year I started during again and went bananas. Ever since I started drinking again(6 months ago)I have gained 50 pounds.

Eating healthy is important but I think my biggest issue is moderation. If I go on a diet and eat only healthy food, what would I do when my job has a pizza party or has barbecue? Say no to free food? Or practice eating just one or two slices or one plate of barbecue. I prefer the latter but I can't stay with just one pizza or plate b/c I can't control it.

I agree with much of what's been written here. I had out-of-control eating habits that eventually caused my weight to balloon up to 440 lbs at one point. I've lost 160 lbs now, and am slimmer at 36 years old than I was at 16. Here's what helped me - I hope at least one of these things will help you.

1) Treating my Inattentive ADD and fibromyalgia pain with proper medication, lifestyle changes (organizing/decluttering/daily moderate exercise/healthy eating) and mindfulness.
2) Surrounding myself with healthy, positive, active people. Reading books and absorbing media put out by people like this.
3) Finding an exercise routine I love. In my case, aerobics, weight-training and yoga. Daily exercise releases endorphins, balances neurotransmitters, strengthens my body, relieves stress, and helps counteract the effects from years of overeating.
4) I eat regular, small portions of food every 3-4 hours. A balance of carbs from fruits/vegetables/whole grains, lean protein and healthy fats. I carry a small lunch cooler with me everywhere that has my favorite healthy munchies in it.
5) I carry a double-walled stainless steel water bottle with me everywhere, too. I've gotten to where plain ice water is fine, but I made the transition easier by using packets of Crystal Light or brewing iced tea to drink instead of soda. I don't like artificial sweeteners, but they aided me in getting away from soda. If it's the carbonation you crave in a soda, try drinking club soda with lime or lemon. Hydration is a huge part of maintaining energy, focus, and healthy habits.
6) There are very few foods I say, "never" to, but the ones I do are those I know I simply can't eat in moderation. Example: Oreo cookies. I can't keep them in the house, period. I don't have an issue controlling portions at parties or whatever because I eat regular, healthy meals and snacks. Keeping blood sugar level often nips overeating in the bud automatically.
7) If you're constantly craving sweets, take a look at the amount of fruits and vegetables you're eating. Are you eating at least three servings of vegetables and two of fruit a day? If not, it's going to be hard to even attempt meeting your body's need for certain vitamins. This alone can cause overeating because the body and brain are malnourished.
8) I take a multivitamin/mineral supplement and an Omega 3-6-9 supplement daily, and they helpedy body get what diet alone fails to provide.
9) Accept that eating healthy is a permanent lifestyle change that requires an adjustment of habits, mindset and the way we view food. Food might be "free" of financial cost at parties and such, but only you can say if pizza or BBQ - if they can't be eaten in moderation - are worth the cost to your health, weight, and mental state.

-Liz