View Full Version : Anti-anxiety meds "alcohol in pills?"


Postulate
03-05-17, 07:09 PM
I'm in the same boat, I get triggered big time to the point I believe I have hypomania. Read a book called "moody *******". Seriously, falling in love is supposed to make people feel crazy and obsessive, some can handle it and like the feeling others like myself and you can't....So I'm seeing a therapist cause I have fallen for someone who is actually very decent. I asked him if going back on my anti-anxiety meds seemed rediculous? He said, intimacy is a human need, people go on meds so they can work, or go to school, to be able to connect in a deep way is just as important. And for what ever reason, allowing myself to take meds while I get through the hyperfocus/unpredictable parts has been empowering.

Anti-anxiety meds are best described as "alcohol in pills". Could you describe how taking these during a relationship makes you empowered? What do you mean? Thanks.

dvdnvwls
03-05-17, 07:53 PM
Anti-anxiety meds are best described as "alcohol in pills".
Not only do i disagree with calling that description "best", I don't think that even comes close to describing them.

Lunacie
03-05-17, 08:53 PM
Anti-anxiety meds are best described as "alcohol in pills". Could you describe how taking these during a relationship makes you empowered? What do you mean? Thanks.

There are several kinds of meds that are used to treat anxiety: SSRIs, anti-
depresants, anti-anxiety meds, even some beta blockers.

I've taken a beta-blocker, Propranolol, and certainly didn't feel like I was using
alcohol. I took it for hypertension but sadly was allergic to it.

I have taken two anti-depressants, Celexa and Zoloft, and never felt like I was
using alcohol. Celexa worked well but caused weight gain for me. Zoloft has
been a sanity saver for around five years now.

I can't say how benzos like Prozac would feel for me because I haven't tried any.

If any of those meds made you feel like you were using alcohol, I don't discount
your experience, but it wouldn't be accurate to globalize that to everyone.

Postulate
03-05-17, 09:18 PM
There are several kinds of meds that are used to treat anxiety: SSRIs, anti-
depresants, anti-anxiety meds, even some beta blockers.

I've taken a beta-blocker, Propranolol, and certainly didn't feel like I was using
alcohol. I took it for hypertension but sadly was allergic to it.

I have taken two anti-depressants, Celexa and Zoloft, and never felt like I was
using alcohol. Celexa worked well but caused weight gain for me. Zoloft has
been a sanity saver for around five years now.

I can't say how benzos like Prozac would feel for me because I haven't tried any.

If any of those meds made you feel like you were using alcohol, I don't discount
your experience, but it wouldn't be accurate to globalize that to everyone.

I only referred to benzodiazepines and nothing else. If she takes an SSRI for anxiety I retract what I said. She also spoke of hypomania, which caught my attention because of how anti-anxiety agents like benzodiazepines would be terrible treatment for hypomania/mania. So many things didn't add up there :)

Postulate
03-05-17, 09:33 PM
I'm not sure what's going on here, " Knowledge of relationships triggering poor mental health " topic was fragmented and part of it moved here, my question was how that mental health issue(for which she was taking anxiety-meds) was affecting her relationship...I could write a book about benzodiazepines alone, why would I post in this forum section?

Whatever.

Greyhound1
03-05-17, 09:57 PM
I'm not sure what's going on here, " Knowledge of relationships triggering poor mental health " topic was fragmented and part of it moved here, my question was how that mental health issue(for which she was taking anxiety-meds) was affecting her relationship...I could write a book about benzodiazepines alone, why would I post in this forum section?

Whatever.

Sorry for the glitch or whatever happened. I am not sure what but we are looking into it now.

aeon
03-05-17, 10:16 PM
SSRIs and SNRIs like alcohol? Not chemically, or pharmacokinetically, but I had an experience with one that messed me up more than any distilled spirit ever did.

Benzodiazepenes like alcohol? Pharmacokinetically? Yes, because of their action upon GABA-mediated chloride ion channels which determine the excitability and firing of neurons.

That's (in part) what alcohol does.


Cheers,
Ian

Postulate
03-05-17, 10:17 PM
Says who?

Poppycock, I say.


Cheers,
Ian

Aeon, I have read several books written by psychiatrists and I am also listening to a radio show hosted by a psychiatrist.

Could you believe that, some women are able to better tolerate their relationship under the effect of alcohol? :giggle: Oooouuuuu!!! The cat came out of the bag. Sorry! :giggle:

The best alcohol equivalent on the market, called Valium, helps many women settle down, get married and have kids! And live happily ever after! It's true!

And finally let's not forget that women who truly need an anxiety treatment and meet a real man who is a good substitute for Valium, he will appease her anxiety through his affection, and when he quits, she withdraws. It's true. And this can be an indication, and the OP will pay close attention to this part I hope, that her anxiety treatment may not be very well tuned. It can be.

Greyhound1
03-05-17, 10:39 PM
Thread title issues corrected

Lunacie
03-05-17, 10:45 PM
Aeon, I have read several books written by psychiatrists and I am also listening to a radio show hosted by a psychiatrist.

Could you believe that, some women are able to better tolerate their relationship under the effect of alcohol? :giggle: Oooouuuuu!!! The cat came out of the bag. Sorry! :giggle:

The best alcohol equivalent on the market, called Valium, helps many women settle down, get married and have kids! And live happily ever after! It's true!

And finally let's not forget that women who truly need an anxiety treatment and meet a real man who is a good substitute for Valium, he will appease her anxiety through his affection, and when he quits, she withdraws. It's true. And this can be an indication, and the OP will pay close attention to this part I hope, that her anxiety treatment may not be very well tuned. It can be.

And vice versa ... can you believe that some MEN are able to better tolerate
a difficult relationship under the effect of alcohol or medication?

Also, your post actually responded to someone other than the OP.

The OP lives in the boondocks of the UK and has a very hard time getting
good treatment for her mental disorders.

Lunacie
03-05-17, 10:46 PM
I only referred to benzodiazepines and nothing else. If she takes an SSRI for anxiety I retract what I said. She also spoke of hypomania, which caught my attention because of how anti-anxiety agents like benzodiazepines would be terrible treatment for hypomania/mania. So many things didn't add up there :)

You may have only referred to benzodiazepines in your mind, but what came
out in your post was not that specific. There are other medications used to
treat anxiety.

aeon
03-05-17, 10:47 PM
Aeon, I have read several books written by psychiatrists and I am also listening to a radio show hosted by a psychiatrist.

Could you believe that, some women are able to better tolerate their relationship under the effect of alcohol? :giggle: Oooouuuuu!!! The cat came out of the bag. Sorry! :giggle:

The best alcohol equivalent on the market, called Valium, helps many women settle down, get married and have kids! And live happily ever after! It's true!

And finally let's not forget that women who truly need an anxiety treatment and meet a real man who is a good substitute for Valium, he will appease her anxiety through his affection, and when he quits, she withdraws. It's true. And this can be an indication, and the OP will pay close attention to this part I hope, that her anxiety treatment may not be very well tuned. It can be.

That had nothing to do with what I said.

Also, your appeal to authority was weakly played.


Cheers,
Ian

Postulate
03-05-17, 11:11 PM
And vice versa ... can you believe that some MEN are able to better tolerate
a difficult relationship under the effect of alcohol or medication?

Men don't drink for the same reason. Most men you describe, if the relationship became difficult is because of their drinking problem. So it's not the same thing.

Also, your post actually responded to someone other than the OP.

The OP lives in the boondocks of the UK and has a very hard time getting
good treatment for her mental disorders.

So what I said was true, if she has such a hard time moving on, it's because she (upon doctor confirmation) needs anxiety treatment. So what are we arguing about? This whole topic can be summed up as: OP, Talk to your doctor about Valium. I said it here:

And finally let's not forget that women who truly need an anxiety treatment and meet a real man who is a good substitute for Valium, he will appease her anxiety through his affection, and when he quits, she withdraws. It's true. And this can be an indication, and the OP will pay close attention to this part I hope, that her anxiety treatment may not be very well tuned. It can be. That had nothing to do with what I said.

Also, your appeal to authority was weakly played.


Cheers,
Ian

Meh what can i do, can't compete with you Ian! You're the happy lovebird :)

Postulate
03-06-17, 12:37 AM
You may have only referred to benzodiazepines in your mind, but what came
out in your post was not that specific. There are other medications used to
treat anxiety.

Yes yes, my mistake. Should have specified. Good eye.

sarahsweets
03-06-17, 05:18 AM
Aeon, I have read several books written by psychiatrists and I am also listening to a radio show hosted by a psychiatrist.

Could you believe that, some women are able to better tolerate their relationship under the effect of alcohol? :giggle: Oooouuuuu!!! The cat came out of the bag. Sorry! :giggle:
I dont know if I think anyone needs to "tolerate" their relationships. I would say that if tolerating is all someone can do, then the relationship isnt that strong to begin with. And I women can tolerate a relationship because of alcohol, the same can be said of men.

The best alcohol equivalent on the market, called Valium, helps many women settle down, get married and have kids! And live happily ever after! It's true!
You say this as if its typical of women to need or want something like valium in order to get married and have kids. Maybe in the 60's when the "mother's little helpers" pills were popular that could have been true, but I would like to think that for the most part its not. And why cant it also be true for men? Isnt it possible that there are men who rely on benzos or alcohol to tolerate their own relationships?


And finally let's not forget that women who truly need an anxiety treatment and meet a real man who is a good substitute for Valium, he will appease her anxiety through his affection, and when he quits, she withdraws. It's true. And this can be an indication, and the OP will pay close attention to this part I hope, that her anxiety treatment may not be very well tuned. It can be.
I would like to think that a women who requires meds for anxiety, would still need them regardless of whether they are in a relationship or not.

Little Missy
03-06-17, 09:42 AM
No hangover with benzodiazepines.

Postulate
03-06-17, 12:29 PM
You say this as if its typical of women to need or want something like valium in order to get married and have kids. Maybe in the 60's when the "mother's little helpers" pills were popular that could have been true, but I would like to think that for the most part its not. And why cant it also be true for men? Isnt it possible that there are men who rely on benzos or alcohol to tolerate their own relationships?

Yep, very possible.


I would like to think that a women who requires meds for anxiety, would still need them regardless of whether they are in a relationship or not.

That was exactly my point, that a woman should not rely on a man as her anxiety med and get proper treatment.

Lunacie
03-06-17, 01:44 PM
I would like to think that a women who requires meds for anxiety, would still need them regardless of whether they are in a relationship or not.

:goodpost:

I have had anxiety all my life. Just like my grandkids, I had it as a child.

If it had been diagnosed and treated sooner, my marriage might have been better,
but maybe not. :scratch:

I'm not in a relationship now but no one better try to take my Zoloft away from me! :eyebrow:

Lloyd_
06-09-17, 07:52 PM
There are several kinds of meds that are used to treat anxiety: SSRIs, anti-
depresants, anti-anxiety meds, even some beta blockers.

I've taken a beta-blocker, Propranolol, and certainly didn't feel like I was using
alcohol. I took it for hypertension but sadly was allergic to it.

I have taken two anti-depressants, Celexa and Zoloft, and never felt like I was
using alcohol. Celexa worked well but caused weight gain for me. Zoloft has
been a sanity saver for around five years now.

I can't say how benzos like Prozac would feel for me because I haven't tried any.

If any of those meds made you feel like you were using alcohol, I don't discount
your experience, but it wouldn't be accurate to globalize that to everyone.

For some reason my body doesn't metabolize benzos such as xanax too well, even a 'micro dose' will make me black out for 12 hrs.

Lloyd_
06-09-17, 07:55 PM
I've just learned to cope with anxiety the best that I can and although I'll have the occasional 'episode' it seems that I have a better handle on it in my later years, I've tried SSRIS and anti anxiety meds such as Lexapro which just made me feel like a zombie, even in small dosages. Heck, even amphetamines work as a much better anti anxiety med than the other garbage I've been prescribed.

Lunacie
06-09-17, 09:25 PM
I've just learned to cope with anxiety the best that I can and although I'll have the occasional 'episode' it seems that I have a better handle on it in my later years, I've tried SSRIS and anti anxiety meds such as Lexapro which just made me feel like a zombie, even in small dosages. Heck, even amphetamines work as a much better anti anxiety med than the other garbage I've been prescribed.

Just because some meds don't work well for you personally doesn't make
them "garbage."

I've never had anything bad to say about the beta blocker that I was allergic
to, just one of the many things I'm allergic to. Other people take them every
day to prevent heart attack and stroke, and even help with anxiety.

I've tried all the supplements that are supposed to be helpful as well, things
like magnesium and zinc. They haven't helped me at all, but I don't call them
garbage because they are still helpful for other people.

Unmedicated, my anxiety was crippling. I'm 66, don't know if that's what you
mean by "later years" but I'm thankful I don't have to suffer any longer.

aeon
06-09-17, 10:22 PM
My top 2 anti-anxiety meds.

1. dextroamphetamine sulfate (Dexedrine)
2. lorazepam (Ativan)

#2 works, but I don't like what it does to me aside from the anti-anxiety bit.

#1...just pure magic.


Cheers,
Ian

Lloyd_
06-10-17, 10:46 AM
Just because some meds don't work well for you personally doesn't make
them "garbage."

I've never had anything bad to say about the beta blocker that I was allergic
to, just one of the many things I'm allergic to. Other people take them every
day to prevent heart attack and stroke, and even help with anxiety.

I've tried all the supplements that are supposed to be helpful as well, things
like magnesium and zinc. They haven't helped me at all, but I don't call them
garbage because they are still helpful for other people.

Unmedicated, my anxiety was crippling. I'm 66, don't know if that's what you
mean by "later years" but I'm thankful I don't have to suffer any longer.

I'm glad it works for you, I've met people who can pop xanax like candy and go to work unaffected. :eek:

I call some of that stuff garbage because that's exactly how it makes me feel, always wondered why it makes me feel that way but not in other people.

Lunacie
06-10-17, 11:05 AM
I'm glad it works for you, I've met people who can pop xanax like candy and go to work unaffected. :eek:

I call some of that stuff garbage because that's exactly how it makes me feel, always wondered why it makes me feel that way but not in other people.

Yeah, and I wonder why I'm allergic to propranolol when others aren't. Or why
I'm allergic to perfume when others use a dozen different scents on the same
day ... how do they know what one smells like when they use so many (bath
products, perfume or aftershave, clothing scented by laundry products, scents
in makeup and hair products, scented candles or air fresheners automatically
squirting their chemicals into the air every 15 minutes).

It makes me feel worse than garbage ... I can and have ended up in the
emergency room for treatment. Not just physical symptoms, also neurological
symptoms (blood pressure going too low and bouncing up too high, horrible
fuzzy brain ... nurse told me not to drive to the ER but to call an ambulance
after I'd just driven 25 miles and didn't recognize one stretch of road that I've
been driving on for 12 years).

Other people use scented products and enjoy them, so they're not "garbage",
I just have a weird personal reaction to them.