View Full Version : Parenting styles help children who have genetic predisposition.


mildadhd
03-12-17, 03:26 PM
Good news!

Primary caregivers with awareness of certain parenting and discipline styles help lessen externalizing behaviours in toddlers with DRD4 genetic predispositions associated with ADHD (aka deficits of self-regulation)

Abstract
In a randomized controlled trial we tested the role of genetic differences in explaining variability in intervention effects on child externalizing behavior. One hundred fifty-seven families with 1- to 3-year-old children screened for their relatively high levels of externalizing behavior participated in a study implementing Video-feedback Intervention to promote Positive Parenting and Sensitive Discipline (VIPP-SD), with six 1.5-hr intervention sessions focusing on maternal sensitivity and discipline. A moderating role of the dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) variable-number tandem repeat (VNTR) exon III polymorphism was found: VIPP-SD proved to be effective in decreasing externalizing behavior in children with the DRD4 7-repeat allele, a polymorphism that is associated with motivational and reward mechanisms and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in children. VIPP-SD effects were largest in children with the DRD4 7-repeat allele whose parents showed the largest increase in the use of positive discipline. The findings of this first experimental test of (measured) gene by (observed) environment interaction in human development indicate that children may be differentially susceptible to intervention effects depending on genetic differences.


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18194028/


i!i

aeon
03-12-17, 06:43 PM
Evidence of one's early-life relational environment's potential to positively shape underlying temperament resulting from genetic foundations.


Brilliant,
Ian

Lunacie
03-12-17, 08:42 PM
Fortunately ADHD is genetic, so the parent truly "gets" the child.

Unfortunately ADHD is genetic, so the parent may be quite impatient and
inconsistent.

mildadhd
03-12-17, 09:41 PM
Fortunately ADHD is genetic, so the parent truly "gets" the child.

Unfortunately ADHD is genetic, so the parent may be quite impatient and
inconsistent.

Our hypersensitive temperaments are genetically inherited.

Fine tuning of human self-regulation develops in interaction with the environment.

ADHD (aka, deficits of self-regulation) always has both environmental factors and genetic factors, specifics depend on both individual temperament and individual circumstances.






m

mildadhd
03-12-17, 10:20 PM
It is important to recognize that not all people diagnosed with ADHD have a known genetic predisposition.

Not all people who have a known genetic predisposition have ADHD.

But that having a known genetic predisposition and certain environments may make it more likely that genetic expression occurs.


m

mildadhd
03-12-17, 10:39 PM
It is the caregivers awareness of the child's more sensitive temperament, and how to respond to the child's more sensitive temperament, that helped.



m

Lunacie
03-13-17, 03:17 PM
Our hypersensitive temperaments are genetically inherited.

Fine tuning of human self-regulation develops in interaction with the environment.

ADHD (aka, deficits of self-regulation) always has both environmental factors and genetic factors, specifics depend on both individual temperament and individual circumstances.






m

I don't think you got my point.

When the parent also has ADHD, it's easier for them to understand their child.

But ... when the parent also has ADHD, they often have less patience and are
more likely to be inconsistent.

So in some ways the parent may have a better connection with their child but
... they may find it much more difficult to be a good parent.

namazu
03-13-17, 06:56 PM
REMINDER FROM THE MODERATORS:

Please keep in mind that this is the Scientific Discussion section. In this section, published research (like the paper mildadhd posted, or others that are relevant to this topic) should remain central to the discussion.

You are welcome to discuss shortcomings of the published work(s), or future directions for research, but again, please keep them focused on the literature in question.

Please see the section sticky (http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=153523) for further guidance.

Lunacie
03-13-17, 10:37 PM
Namazu, I'm not trying to be argumentative, but I thought I was on topic
in discussing how difficult it can be for a parent to provide a positive parenting
and/or discipline environment when the parent also has ADHD (and perhaps
anxiety, depression, bipolar, autism, or any commonly comorbid disorder).

If the focus of this thread is more narrow than that, and suggestions can be
made on how parents with mental disorders themselves can still provide that
positive environment, then I'm good with that.

mildadhd
03-13-17, 10:55 PM
I don't think you got my point.

When the parent also has ADHD, it's easier for them to understand their child.

But ... when the parent also has ADHD, they often have less patience and are
more likely to be inconsistent.

So in some ways the parent may have a better connection with their child but
... they may find it much more difficult to be a good parent.



In my experience, self-awareness of my own more sensitive temperament helps me and my family by considering similar positive (self) parenting and sensitive (self) discipline approaches, mentioned in the OP article.

It would also help all people diagnosed with ADHD, if other family and community members were also aware of our more sensitive temperaments and similar approaches.





m

Fuzzy12
03-14-17, 01:48 AM
What is positive parenting and what is sensitive discipline?

Lunacie
03-14-17, 10:37 AM
In my experience, self-awareness of my own more sensitive temperament helps me and my family by considering similar positive (self) parenting and sensitive (self) discipline approaches, mentioned in the OP article.

It would also help all people diagnosed with ADHD, if other family and community members were also aware of our more sensitive temperaments and similar approaches.





m

It really would help a LOT. But that just doesn't happen.

I'm on a few online groups for parents of kids with autism and ODD, and
everyone is so happy to have a place where they can vent without judgment
from other people (especially family) or comments like "My kid was just like
that, be patient, they grow out of it." Or "A good spanking would bring him/her
right around."

No they don't grow out of it. And there is no such thing as a "good" spanking.
Truly ignorant and entirely unhelpful.

Lunacie
03-14-17, 10:42 AM
What is positive parenting and what is sensitive discipline?

I don't know if this is what Peri means by positive parenting, but for me it means
teaching your child to make good decisions by letting them practice.

And not blaming them for things that are part of their medical issue, just as you
wouldn't blame a child with muscular dystrophy for not trying out for the soccer
team.

I think kids are more likely to succeed when we tell them what we want instead
of what we don't want. Like saying "Soft voices please" instead of "Don't shout."

mildadhd
03-14-17, 02:11 PM
What is positive parenting and what is sensitive discipline?

I think they are like the relationship between sensitive parenting and positive discipline.



m

Luvmybully
03-14-17, 02:47 PM
In my experience, self-awareness of my own more sensitive temperament helps me and my family by considering similar positive (self) parenting and sensitive (self) discipline approaches, mentioned in the OP article.

It would also help all people diagnosed with ADHD, if other family and community members were also aware of our more sensitive temperaments and similar approaches.





m

Self awareness is a wonderful thing. However, being aware does not mean you can ALTER it.

Fuzzy12
03-14-17, 03:17 PM
I think they are like the relationship between sensitive parenting and positive discipline.



m
That just didn't clarify anything for me at all. :lol:

No worries though.:)

Luvmybully
03-14-17, 04:23 PM
What is positive parenting and what is sensitive discipline?

I know what this means to me, but I think clarifying what it was in this study would be very helpful.

For me it easiest to give examples of what this means to me. The study involved 1-3 year olds. Age where they are exploring everything and have no concept of their own safety.

Instead of telling your child No, or Stop. Tell them what you DO want them to do. (put the cup down vs stop throwing the cup)

Redirect whenever possible. (have something to engage, like a book or a toy if they are doing something you don't want them doing)

Know what triggers emotional meltdowns and avoid them. (like making sure the cookies aren't on the counter when you KNOW they are going to cry if they can't have one)

ADAPT your methods to suit your child, vs forcing your child to adapt to your methods.

These are a few, I am VERY interested in the methods used in the study.

mildadhd
03-14-17, 05:04 PM
That just didn't clarify anything for me at all. :lol:

No worries though.:)

If I understand correctly, 157 families involved in the research attended "six 1.5-hr intervention sessions focusing on maternal sensitivity and discipline."

All children are born with sensitive temperaments.

But people diagnosed with ADHD were born with even more sensitive temperaments.

The researchers educated the caregivers and when the caregivers applied what they learned, helped their children.

Peripatetic post a thread in the parenting section about a book about positive parenting. (I have not read the book yet, but recently I started listening to audiobooks and I hope listen to the audiobook if it is available, sooner or later)

I am not familiar with these researchers in the OP.

But I have been considering very similar relationship concepts for years.

I prefer to say balanced parenting, rather than positive parenting.


If members have a particular concept they wish to explore that is sparked by conversation, please create a new thread in the apporpriate section or build on an existing thread referencing the Op's original topic. Andi

I will start new thread based on my experiences and preferences to try to answer your question in my own words.


m

Luvmybully
03-14-17, 07:03 PM
I will start new thread based on my experiences and preferences to try to answer your question in my own words.



Since the questions are directly related to the methods in the posted study, isn't this the correct place to discuss them?

namazu
03-14-17, 07:27 PM
Since the questions are directly related to the methods in the posted study, isn't this the correct place to discuss them?
Yes, it would be completely appropriate to discuss the " Video-feedback Intervention to promote Positive Parenting and Sensitive Discipline (VIPP-SD)" approach used in the study in this thread.

It would also be appropriate to compare it with other parenting approaches that have been studied with kids with behavioral challenges.

More general discussion of parenting strategies, and sharing of personal experience without relating it to the published literature, might fit better in another thread.

Fuzzy12
03-14-17, 07:41 PM
If I understand correctly, 157 families involved in the research attended "six 1.5-hr intervention sessions focusing on maternal sensitivity and discipline."

All children are born with sensitive temperaments.

But people diagnosed with ADHD were born with even more sensitive temperaments.

The researchers educated the caregivers and when the caregivers applied what they learned, helped their children.

Peripatetic post a thread in the parenting section about a book about positive parenting. (I have not read the book yet, but recently I started listening to audiobooks and I hope listen to the audiobook if it is available, sooner or later)

I am not familiar with these researchers in the OP.

But I have been considering very similar relationship concepts for years.

I prefer to say balanced parenting, rather than positive parenting.



[/COLOR]I will start new thread based on my experiences and preferences to try to answer your question in my own words.


m

Thanks!! :)

mildadhd
03-15-17, 02:43 AM
Here is a link with information about the "Video-feedback Intervention to promote Positive Parenting and Sensitive Discipline (VIPP-SD)"

The Video-feedback Intervention to promote Positive Parenting and Sensitive Discipline (VIPP-SD) is a preventive intervention aimed at increasing sensitivity and improving discipline strategies of caregivers in order to encourage positive interaction between caregiver and child, and to prevent or reduce behavioral problems in children aged 1 to 5 years. To reach this goal the intervenor works on:


1. increasing the observational skills of caregivers

2. increasing caregivers’ knowledge about the upbringing and development of young children

3. increasing the capacity of caregivers to empathize with their children

4. making parenting behavior more effective by using sensitive responsiveness and sensitive discipline...



http://www.leidenattachmentresearchprogram.eu/vipp/files/folder_uk_rev2012-1.pdf