View Full Version : why the stimulatory neurotransmitter glutamate is less talked about?


baical
03-15-17, 11:27 AM
since the stimulatory neurotransmitters are norepinephrine and glutamate, does that mean glutamatergic drugs MAY have potential in actually treating ADHD? Usually glutamatergic drugs are PCP, Ketamine and DXM, etc. These are no more "dangerous" than amphetamines if only it were studied well and prescribed well. I think glutamatergic drugs needs to be looked into as treatment for ADHD. Sometimes one may not respond well to norepinephrine but respond better to glutamatergic drugs.

Amphetamines are 50/50 dopaminergic and norepinephrinergic from what I understand. Norepinephrine is what gives the stimulant effect. Glutamatergic drugs need a closer look! Ketamine seem to be leading the pack if anyone's been following its progress. DXM is pretty much cough syrup over the counter.

aeon
03-15-17, 11:56 AM
This assumes the neurotransmitter theory of disorders is correct.

That’s a huge assumption, and not one that is going to be proven any time soon.

That said, your question is certainly one of merit.


Thanks,
Ian

TygerSan
03-15-17, 01:22 PM
The short answer is yes, they do.

Cholinergic drugs (aka those that target nicotinic receptors) have been studied with regards to their effectiveness in treating ADHD. Potter and Newhouse have been the leaders, but there are other researchers as well.

Glutaminergic such as Namenda and other Alzheimer's drugs have also been studied. I don't think any one of those drugs by themselves have proven to be as efficacious as stimulants by themselves, but the research is beginning to come out.

http://psychnews.psychiatryonline.org/doi/10.1176/pn.38.22.0025

baical
03-22-17, 03:15 PM
It's been looked at for depression possibly:

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/03/20/520169959/ketamine-for-severe-depression-how-do-you-not-offer-this-drug-to-people

I think "depression" is a more marketable term and can "cross-over" rather than just ADHD.

This assumes the neurotransmitter theory of disorders is correct.

That’s a huge assumption, and not one that is going to be proven any time soon.

That said, your question is certainly one of merit.


Thanks,
Ian

baical
03-22-17, 03:19 PM
Maybe if they make Nameda stimulating it could work possibly? I don't get why it's not stimulatory when it's glutaminergic?

Maybe ADHD is complicated according to this article from cheatsheet.com called "10 Conditions That Look Like ADHD, but Are Actually Something Else":



Bipolar Disorder
Epilepsy
Anxiety
Thyroid Conditions
Sensory Processing Disorder
Sleep Conditions
Central Auditory Processing Disorder
Asperger Syndrome
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Depression




Some of these 10 conditions I think seem to be treated well with amphetamines as far as I'm concerned. My OCD, anxiety, and depression seem to have been taken care of with Dexedrine especially when I get a good night's sleep.


The short answer is yes, they do.

Cholinergic drugs (aka those that target nicotinic receptors) have been studied with regards to their effectiveness in treating ADHD. Potter and Newhouse have been the leaders, but there are other researchers as well.

Glutaminergic such as Namenda and other Alzheimer's drugs have also been studied. I don't think any one of those drugs by themselves have proven to be as efficacious as stimulants by themselves, but the research is beginning to come out.

http://psychnews.psychiatryonline.org/doi/10.1176/pn.38.22.0025