View Full Version : Apprehension, fear, anxiety


PaulCamR
03-16-17, 11:35 PM
Context: I switched career paths. I need to find a job in my field that I can stick with for the next 4+ years, because certification in my career path requires that. I will also be a part-time student for the next ~4 years.

Questions

1. How do you manage the stress of not knowing where you're going (when you're pursuing a specific career, but still don't know your hand from your foot)? I don't have an adequate awareness of the things I don't know yet. I have to seek employment for around July this year, and I'm taking accelerated courses at the moment. I am going into this stuff so blind, because I'm just now getting into intermediate coursework. Because of my age, I have to move quite quickly.

2. How do you handle such a demanding change in your life? I got through university (4-year degree) as a full-time student. I didn't work, except during summers. This is quite a bit different. I will have to work full-time (40 hours a week or perhaps more), plus study 20-30 hours per week. For 4 years. Fighting for vacation time (a couple weeks a year) may conflict with time off for exams.

This change is quite stressful for me, because I'm in my late 20's. I don't have as much leeway as I did in my early 20's to slow down and think. I don't have much in the way of options about how I move forward, because requirements are requirements, and this is definitely the career path I want.

dvdnvwls
03-17-17, 12:24 AM
You are now in a situation where hard-and-fast rules for exactly how to proceed are counterproductive. The details of your situation (well, the essentials of it, for that matter) are unique in a way that they weren't when you left high school.

But I'll say this:

So what if the requirements are the requirements? The requirements don't change you into a different person. If you've chosen to do the impossible and chosen to eat the consequences, then start chewing.

PaulCamR
03-17-17, 01:23 AM
You are now in a situation where hard-and-fast rules for exactly how to proceed are counterproductive. The details of your situation (well, the essentials of it, for that matter) are unique in a way that they weren't when you left high school.

But I'll say this:

So what if the requirements are the requirements? The requirements don't change you into a different person. If you've chosen to do the impossible and chosen to eat the consequences, then start chewing.

To the last part: I definitely haven't chosen to do the impossible. But the shift will be quite difficult. And maintaining pace (for 4 years) will be quite difficult. As far as gritty "this is your path and your choice" advice, I'm fully aware of that end of things.

But regardless of all that, this is scary. If the requirements were 6 months, I could hold my breath and charge forward. The strategy is quite different in this case. This is a marathon, and I haven't done a marathon before.

dvdnvwls
03-17-17, 01:54 AM
I'm not sure if I've done a marathon either.

I wonder if thinking of it as a marathon-type event might be part of what's making it seem daunting.

Rule: If there's a big problem, smash it. That makes a lot of little problems. Those, you already know how to handle.

userguide
03-17-17, 05:51 AM
Context: I switched career paths. I need to find a job in my field that I can stick with for the next 4+ years, because certification in my career path requires that. I will also be a part-time student for the next ~4 years.

Questions

1. How do you manage the stress of not knowing where you're going (when you're pursuing a specific career, but still don't know your hand from your foot)? I don't have an adequate awareness of the things I don't know yet. I have to seek employment for around July this year, and I'm taking accelerated courses at the moment. I am going into this stuff so blind, because I'm just now getting into intermediate coursework. Because of my age, I have to move quite quickly.

2. How do you handle such a demanding change in your life? I got through university (4-year degree) as a full-time student. I didn't work, except during summers. This is quite a bit different. I will have to work full-time (40 hours a week or perhaps more), plus study 20-30 hours per week. For 4 years. Fighting for vacation time (a couple weeks a year) may conflict with time off for exams.

This change is quite stressful for me, because I'm in my late 20's. I don't have as much leeway as I did in my early 20's to slow down and think. I don't have much in the way of options about how I move forward, because requirements are requirements, and this is definitely the career path I want.


You have 60+ years of life expectancy and you sound like "Houston, I'm running out of oxygen here".

PaulCamR
03-20-17, 12:30 AM
You have 60+ years of life expectancy and you sound like "Houston, I'm running out of oxygen here".

I expect 73 more years, minimum :)

A billionaire can be stressed just as much as someone in debt by a billion dollars can be. It's not about what you have, but where you need and/or want to be.

I have 60+ years ahead of myself, but I need to move out in the next year. I need to have income. I need to find a job in my field. I need to continue taking courses. The fallback is unacceptable to me (not pursuing my career).

The requirements of pursuing my career are quite a lot. So, I am stressed. :( And I'm trying to deal with it all. Going from full time student, to full time work + full time student, is a big change... especially when I hardly handled the full time student bit before.

dvdnvwls
03-20-17, 04:08 AM
When failure is not an option, what happens is that you're forced to permit some other type of failure to become an option instead. If you are absolutely committed to success in full time work and absolutely committed to success in full time school at the same time, what that means in realistic terms is that you've decided to push any failures that do happen into some other part of your life.

Postulate
03-20-17, 09:16 AM
Context: I switched career paths. I need to find a job in my field that I can stick with for the next 4+ years, because certification in my career path requires that. I will also be a part-time student for the next ~4 years.

Questions

1. How do you manage the stress of not knowing where you're going (when you're pursuing a specific career, but still don't know your hand from your foot)? I don't have an adequate awareness of the things I don't know yet. I have to seek employment for around July this year, and I'm taking accelerated courses at the moment. I am going into this stuff so blind, because I'm just now getting into intermediate coursework. Because of my age, I have to move quite quickly.

2. How do you handle such a demanding change in your life? I got through university (4-year degree) as a full-time student. I didn't work, except during summers. This is quite a bit different. I will have to work full-time (40 hours a week or perhaps more), plus study 20-30 hours per week. For 4 years. Fighting for vacation time (a couple weeks a year) may conflict with time off for exams.

This change is quite stressful for me, because I'm in my late 20's. I don't have as much leeway as I did in my early 20's to slow down and think. I don't have much in the way of options about how I move forward, because requirements are requirements, and this is definitely the career path I want.

First, you need to be aware of the reasonable expectations that any employer including the government has of young folks like yourself:

1) Sacrifice the greatest time in your life (15-30 y.o.) and your ability to enjoy life by burning your dopamine receptors trying to prove to employers you can do many things and have an untapped will and ability to work hard. For example, working 2 part-time jobs while enrolled full-time in a demanding engineering degree, while also volunteering, running for President in your student association, starting a company and being able to get an A+ average on top of it.

2) Once employed, become the sacrificial lamb of older employees, who, after losing their ability to enjoy life by wearing out their dopamine and opioid receptors working hard their entire life, now want to have more free time in order to enjoy life, and so they delegate all their work to you and expect it done on time and error free. Remember that once you've lost your ability to enjoy life, you can enjoy life too! So work hard!

3) Finally remember the horrible retribution that society inflicts on those who dare to enjoy life while they are young.

If you understand what they want from you, you will have no issues manipulating them to get whatever job you want.

acdc01
03-20-17, 03:50 PM
I don't get this need to rush. If it's about money, why don't you get roommates or something.