View Full Version : Does awareness of ADHD bring apathy for some?


ajaxblu
04-10-17, 09:44 AM
By the time most people with ADHD are adolescents, their physical hyperactivity (http://www.additudemag.com/adhd/article/1031.html) has been pushed inward and hidden. But it is there and it still impairs the ability to engage in the moment, listen to other people, to relax enough to fall asleep at night, and to have periods of peace.
So when the distractibility and impulsivity are brought back to normal levels by stimulant medication, the ADDer may not be able to make use of his becalmed state. He is still driven forward as if by a motor on the inside, hidden from the rest of the world. By adolescence, most people with ADHD-style nervous systems have acquired the social skills necessary to cover up that they are not present.


This excerpt is from an article in Additude. The sentence in bold brings forth a possible realization for me and I wanted to ask if others have noticed the same about themselves.

Since learning about ADHD, I've been able to understand some of the reasons behind my actions and I've also been taking meds (though I'm not sure yet of their success). I am more self-aware, have a sense of relief in knowing what the problem has been all these decades and that I can do something about it. I have a renewed desire to kick butt and get done all the stuff that I've been unable to finish all this time.

But I'm still doing nothing, and in fact I sometimes feel more paralyzed than I had before. It's as if these things that I love to do are no longer as big a deal on the surface and that I've lost my motivation for them, even though deep down I yearn to get to them.

So I just work on (at times, somewhat successfully) running our household or other mundane things that are musts instead of wants. Perhaps the mundane chores are not as long-ranging as my artistic pursuits and so seem more possible. Maybe I feel guilty for not doing well in the wife/month department for so long. I don't know.

Before taking meds and being more aware, I would constantly be stressing over getting to the things I love. I crammed art and writing and photography projects into little pockets of time while also scrambling to do the responsible things (oftentimes those creative projects didn't get finished either).

Now, I seem to feel resigned, like I'm in slow-down mode. I still can't sleep well at night for the ideas coming into my mind but I seem to be dismissing them, knowing my time-blindness has always caused havoc in our family; knowing there's not enough time for my creative projects so not even trying, thinking I'll get to it tomorrow or next month. I'm getting less done now than I did before I knew I have ADHD, before trying meds. It makes me feel boring and less colorful and pointless.

Which brings me back to the bold sentence in the quote above. Do others notice this in themselves?

aeon
04-10-17, 10:26 AM
Maybe.

At the same time, I think it is likely to be primarily my chronic depression.

So the combination of both...let the apathy begin.


Cheers,
Ian

Little Missy
04-10-17, 10:33 AM
I have been in the biggest longest apathetic funk of depression for WAY too long.

Happiness is definitely fleeting. Hold on with both hands and ride it as long as you can. I'm looking for a hitch.

P.S. I really hope you did not switch to Strattera OP

ajaxblu
04-10-17, 11:03 AM
P.S. I really hope you did not switch to Strattera OP


Thanks for asking - he just switched me 4 days ago from Ritalin to Strattera. All that I described above was before switching, I don't know yet if there's a difference, other than side effects. I've never felt that I'm depressed, though.

May I ask what the downfall is to switching to Strattera? (other than the fact that, in retrospect, I felt he should have upped the Ritalin first)

Little Missy
04-10-17, 12:13 PM
Thanks for asking - he just switched me 4 days ago from Ritalin to Strattera. All that I described above was before switching, I don't know yet if there's a difference, other than side effects. I've never felt that I'm depressed, though.

May I ask what the downfall is to switching to Strattera? (other than the fact that, in retrospect, I felt he should have upped the Ritalin first)

I wouldn't know, I've never taken it. But to have to wait for an ADHD med to work taking 8 weeks is unheard of. There are Strattera success story threads. Not many of them are a success. Strattera is an easy script for a doc to write. It is not a CII Rx.

sarahsweets
04-10-17, 12:33 PM
IMO since Strattera was first studied and released as an antidepressant are one of the downfalls. The things it targets in the brain are more specific to what causes depression. It was sort of Like the company that owns strattera sort of stumbled on to having it work for adhd. I forget how it came about, but it was meant to target depression when it was first trying to gain approval from the fda. Thats not to say it doesnt work for adhd, its just not something I have had good experiences with.

ajaxblu
04-12-17, 08:40 AM
Would there be some type of extenuating circumstances for the psychiatrist to have jumped straight from 20mg Ritalin to 60mg Strattera? Yes, it bothers me that I'll have to wait 8-9 weeks to know if this is a waste of time, but I rarely think to question health professionals in the moment.


For clarification: I started with 20mg Ritalin. I thought it had been giving me headaches and I wasn't sure it was working. He switched me to Focalin. I hated the constant nausea and asked between appointments to be switched back to Ritalin till the next appointment after. This second time I didn't get headaches with Ritalin, though still wasn't sure if it was working. Friday he said if it had been working it would be like an awakening and I would know it, so he switched me to the 60mg Strattera.

Letching Gray
04-12-17, 10:03 AM
Would there be some type of extenuating circumstances for the psychiatrist to have jumped straight from 20mg Ritalin to 60mg Strattera? Yes, it bothers me that I'll have to wait 8-9 weeks to know if this is a waste of time, but I rarely think to question health professionals in the moment.


For clarification: I started with 20mg Ritalin. I thought it had been giving me headaches and I wasn't sure it was working. He switched me to Focalin. I hated the constant nausea and asked between appointments to be switched back to Ritalin till the next appointment after. This second time I didn't get headaches with Ritalin, though still wasn't sure if it was working. Friday he said if it had been working it would be like an awakening and I would know it, so he switched me to the 60mg Strattera.

Atomoxetine is a substrate for CYP2D6 and hence concurrent treatment with CYP2D6 inhibitors such as bupropion (Wellbutrin) or fluoxetine (Prozac) is not recommended, as this can lead to significant elevations of plasma atomoxetine levels. CYP2D6 is not very susceptible to enzyme induction.[15] Other possible drug interactions include:[2]
Antihypertensive and pressor agents, due to the potential pressor effect of indirect sympathomimetics such as atomoxetine.
Norepinephrine-acting agents such as α1 adrenoceptor agonists or norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors due to the potential for additive or synergistic pharmacologic effects.
β-adrenoceptor agonists due to the potential for the effects of these drugs to be potentiated by atomoxetine.
Highly plasma protein-bound drugs due to the potential of atomoxetine to displace these drugs from plasma proteins and hence potentiate their adverse effects. Examples include diazepam, paroxetine and phenytoin.

Letching Gray
04-12-17, 10:19 AM
Would there be some type of extenuating circumstances for the psychiatrist to have jumped straight from 20mg Ritalin to 60mg Strattera? Yes, it bothers me that I'll have to wait 8-9 weeks to know if this is a waste of time, but I rarely think to question health professionals in the moment.

They work in different ways on different neurotransmitters. If Rit was causing headaches, it makes sense to stop it. No contraindications to begin taking Strat immediately after stopping Rit, from what I can tell. The time it takes to build up a "critical mass" in the synaptic cleft through the reuptake of norepinephrine to be effective? --IMO-- zero. It begins working immediately with maximum impact developing with time.

ajaxblu
04-12-17, 07:46 PM
Thank you. I actually told him today that I'm stopping Strattera. I have an acne-like rash I've never had before and the Strattera is the only change in my life to have caused it.

Letching Gray
04-13-17, 02:02 AM
good. way to take care of you