View Full Version : Educational Autism brought up by school


busybeez
04-20-17, 10:49 AM
My son (12) has been medically diagnosed with ADD. He is on medication and has been for quite some time. He is in middle school and just moved to a lower reading class because the school indicated he is 3 grade levels behind in reading. His issue is comprehension. Have discussed with his dr and she recommended having him tested by the school for a learning disability. The testing hasn't begun as of yet but the school counselor just called and mentioned they are thinking he has educational autism. I have never heard of this and he hasn't been tested yet so not sure how this diagnosis came about.
Has anyone else had issues like this?
I believe (with limited research) that he may have dyslexia. Total know all the learning disabilities but this seems to encompass his comprehension issues.
Always thought dyslexia was just transposing letters but learned it is much more.
Any feedback would help. I don't want him to get this label of educational autism if that is not truly what he has. Again I don't even know what that is!!! Just concerned and want to get this resolved so we can proceed with his school career (on the right path).

Caco3girl
04-20-17, 03:29 PM
1. My kids school wouldn't even say the letters ADHD because they aren't' allowed to. They aren't doctors and they can't diagnose a medical condition.

2. My ADHD kid is 4 grade levels behind in his reading because he gets lost from the beginning of the sentence to the end because he has thought of 10 other things. Hard to keep the sentence and story line straight when you feel like you just read 4 paragraphs and really it was one sentence. However, if it is read to him he scores very well, and if he reads it out loud he does about 20-30% better on the tests.

3. I am dyslexic, do not flip my letters and have an excellent reading level. I can also read out loud as fast as I normally speak.

4. Go through the testing, it's free from the school. Then take it to your shrink to interpret.

sarahsweets
04-20-17, 03:46 PM
I thought autism was something you had all the time not just in school?

busybeez
04-20-17, 04:18 PM
He can read "okay". Certainly does better if someone reads to him and stops every so often to quiz him. What do you think of this character, where do you think they will go next, etc.
I just wasn't sure where an "autistic" diagnosis came from. Never heard of educationally autistic. Was kind of peeved since he hasn't been tested for anything.

We have a meeting in early May but seems like this process may take a while (30-45 school days) before we learn of an outcome. By that time he will be in the next grade level and still struggling.

He is our oldest so this is new to us and I want to give him the best chance at success. Just frustrated since it seems like the school is making up their mind before giving him a chance. Labeling him incorrectly can do more harm than good. I want him to be challenged but still able to grasp the concepts instead of being retaught at home.

I get frustrated feeling like he has missed out on certain learning opportunities that may have corrected or assisted him. Being in 6th grade seems late to be discovering this. I have never truly thought of a learning disability but knew he struggled. Always assumed it was just the ADHD. I want to be the advocate for my kiddo and seem him succeed. Feel like he has been passed on from year to year because it may have been "too much work" for the teachers to bring it up.

Lunacie
04-20-17, 04:19 PM
Not. A. Clue.

My 15 year old granddaughter has autism and I thought I'd learned quite a bit.
But this is a new phrase to me.

I do know that schools cannot diagnose or pronounce any medical or develop-
mental disability, so for someone at school to suggest a child has something
that the doctor has not diagnosed is very strange.

Even when a doctor diagnoses a medical or developmental disability, the school
does not have to agree to allow that child an IEP or 504 plan unless they decide
it's needed.

So maybe this counselor was saying that the school wants to do an evaluation
to determine if an IEP or 504 plan would help your son.

dvdnvwls
04-20-17, 09:13 PM
"Educational autism" is normally a term used by schools to weasel out of providing legally-required services, such as "We're aware that three doctors have diagnosed autism, but since we don't feel he has educational autism, we don't have to listen to those silly doctors".

When they say he does have that, you should take it for all it's worth to get him the services HE needs - not necessarily the ones the school feels like giving him.

sarahsweets
04-21-17, 04:19 AM
I would definitely run with the idea that the school is considering any type of autism if it gets your child help in school. The only thing that bothers me is the fact that the school is choosing to do the labeling before any results, or doctor's results. I just think its poor form and I would hate to have your child boxed into something if its more than the autism.

dvdnvwls
04-21-17, 05:27 AM
It's true that "educational autism" is always an invalid diagnosis and always made by an unqualified person. Just use it for what it's worth.

Caco3girl
04-21-17, 07:44 AM
He can read "okay". Certainly does better if someone reads to him and stops every so often to quiz him. What do you think of this character, where do you think they will go next, etc.
I just wasn't sure where an "autistic" diagnosis came from. Never heard of educationally autistic. Was kind of peeved since he hasn't been tested for anything.

We have a meeting in early May but seems like this process may take a while (30-45 school days) before we learn of an outcome. By that time he will be in the next grade level and still struggling.

He is our oldest so this is new to us and I want to give him the best chance at success. Just frustrated since it seems like the school is making up their mind before giving him a chance. Labeling him incorrectly can do more harm than good. I want him to be challenged but still able to grasp the concepts instead of being retaught at home.

I get frustrated feeling like he has missed out on certain learning opportunities that may have corrected or assisted him. Being in 6th grade seems late to be discovering this. I have never truly thought of a learning disability but knew he struggled. Always assumed it was just the ADHD. I want to be the advocate for my kiddo and seem him succeed. Feel like he has been passed on from year to year because it may have been "too much work" for the teachers to bring it up.

My son kept up fairly well until 5th/6th grade, then the gap in his reading comprehension grew...and grew....and grew! I now have a 9th grader that tests somewhere in the 5th grade range. He was failing almost everything because the classes he was in had all that free thinking stuff going on, like you wrote about when you said if someone stops and asks him to think about the character...um my son can't do that.

Have you asked your school about "team taught" or "co-taught" classes? These classes are highly structured with a step by step plan for the week and there are two teachers in the classroom. This helps students who are wandering away in their thoughts focus back on the teacher. There are also a lot of chances to show you understand the material, some verbal, some written. These classes have been a miracle for my son. He went from 65-75% in each class to 85-95%! He's still doing work, he's still being tested, and he's still learning what other kids are learning but it's in a more streamlined fashion and it is working VERY well for him.

If your school wants to label your kid they won't be able to without a medical diagnoses. However, with his ADHD diagnoses they can give him an IEP under the Otherwise Health Impaired catagory and he will be eligible for these co-taught classes. Ask if he can be placed in them for next year. Once my son was being taught in a way he understood all of his grades improved, even in non-co-taught classes like health...I truly think this is because he finally began to have confidence in what he was capable of.

Bebe11
04-26-17, 11:26 PM
I am a retired educational administrator, and I suggest that you schedule a meeting with the counselor and discuss your concerns this week. I know you want what is best for your son, and the best thing is to work with the school to do everything you can to get him the help he needs. Ask his teacher if there is anything you can do at home to help. Ask the counselor if they have any tutoring for him before or after school. Find out what this label is and ask the counselor what the school will do to help him. I really hope you get the answers you need soon. Hang in there!

dvdnvwls
04-27-17, 02:11 AM
Maybe tutoring and help at home are not the types of things that are needed. Maybe some things need to happen differently in the classroom. Don't accept what's offered just because it was offered; make sure that what your son ends up with is a situation that works well for him, not necessarily matching up with what's easy for the school to provide.

Of course, if what's offered is actually helpful, then rejoice. But it isn't always that way.