View Full Version : ADD Primary Inattentive


Emma1904
04-27-17, 07:35 AM
Hi,

My son is ADD PI, I'm struggling to find other parents or careers with children when have this subtype. Is there any one on here at all?

Thanks

namazu
04-27-17, 11:18 AM
Hi Emma,

Welcome to ADDF.

There are a number of parents of kids whose symptoms are primarily "inattentive", and many adults here who identify with that profile as well.

You're in the right place!

Caco3girl
04-27-17, 02:57 PM
Hi,

My son is ADD PI, I'm struggling to find other parents or careers with children when have this subtype. Is there any one on here at all?

Thanks

THAT'S MY BOY! 14 year old 9th grader, diagnosed last year as being ADHD inattentive type...although he does have impulse issues now that I know what those are. A bit of tapping, a bit of throwing up a ball and catching it, not realizing he was humming, has to touch the door jam on his way out of a classroom....and he is about as mature as a 6th grader.

angelover02740
05-09-17, 11:08 AM
Thats my child as well... We are still trying to find the right dosage but I feel like its a struggle because Im not seeing much improvement

dvdnvwls
05-09-17, 02:06 PM
angelover... What kind of improvement are you looking for?

Caco3girl
05-11-17, 11:55 AM
Thats my child as well... We are still trying to find the right dosage but I feel like its a struggle because Im not seeing much improvement

Everyone is different but I can tell you what worked for my kid:
1. Concerta 54mg in morning
2. Adderal 20mg at 6am, 20mg at 12:15pm
3. Adderal XR 40mg in morning

All of those worked well for him...it's been kind of interesting seeing his personality start to shine through rather than the stoned surfer dude thing he's had going on for the last 3 years or so! I say "kind of interesting" because apparently my kid is a smart ****...can't imagine where he gets that from!:scratch:

Celestedu
06-28-17, 06:07 AM
My son is 10 and is also inattentive however he seems to fit the SCT 'label' more.
He's been on Ritalin and Concerta which I don't think helped that much. He's in a remedial school with smaller classes at the moment.

Unfortunately in my country we only have 3 types of ADHD meds.

I've been doing a lot of reading about nootropics and giving that a try before attempting Stratterra.

Caco3girl
06-29-17, 10:38 AM
I think at age 10 it would be hard to tell if it's working because at age 10 the schools in the US are still hand holding children because they know they will forget things, so they remind them 10 times when the test is, what to study for it, talk about the big project every day for a week...etc. It was around age 12 where he struggled to pass his classes because the teachers didn't repeat things 5 times, only one of which he caught. At age 12 he didn't catch it and was surprised when a test was coming up or a project was due.

Davidsmom
09-26-17, 03:19 PM
Thats my child as well... We are still trying to find the right dosage but I feel like its a struggle because Im not seeing much improvement
My son was diagnosed with ADD- Inattentive back in grade 5. He was on Concerta 36mg. x2. He is now 15 entering grade 10. In grade 8 we noticed some discrepancies in the way he studied; downloading class topics. This is when we noticed class notes were minimal. Entering high school we had him identified and put on an IEP so that he could access teachers' notes. This has been to no avail. He spent 20 + hours studying for exams and walked away with 60s. So back to psychologist we went who diagnosed him with SCT and also advised that the Concerta may not be working. We switched to Vyvanse 50mgx1. But he may not yet be on the right dosage. He gets very distracted while doing h/w. Does not finish simple in class tasks. He is having temper tantrums that he was never prone to. He just spent the weekend studying for a unit test yet forgot the material he studied. I don't think Vyvanse is working. But with the new diagnoses could it be he just isn't registering the lessons? We tried to get a smarten for him but our school board has an issue as it may have an impact on the teachers if something said is taken out of context. Anyone have any accommodations that assist the working memory other than meds?? Tx.

jaznia15
09-28-17, 05:14 PM
I am in the process of getting my 10 year old son evaluated and this is the subtype that I think he has. He lacks focus and organization, but has no hyperactivity. I will definitely keep you posted on the final verdict.

WhiteOwl
10-01-17, 03:38 PM
My 13 yr old son has primarily attentive, which is what I have. He has had some impulse issues, but has never been hyperactive. My 10 yr old daughter is the one with hyperactivity. I can't even deal with her when she's off her meds, she's like a wild animal.

My son is now taking 27mg of Concerta, which is kind of a low dose and I feel like he could be doing better with his forgetfulness, but he does seem to be able to focus and pay attention pretty well. When he was on a higher dose, he seemed zombified and never wanted to come out of his room or talk to anyone, so we lowered it. My daughter was also zombified on a higher dose and would just sit and twirl her hair, it was kind of creepy. You just have to find the right dosage. I've wondered if there were other meds that would be better, but after taking so long to find the right dose with Concerta, I am hesitant to try switching, and they do seem to be doing good on the Concerta now.

sarahsweets
10-10-17, 04:15 AM
My son was diagnosed with ADD- Inattentive back in grade 5. He was on Concerta 36mg. x2. He is now 15 entering grade 10. In grade 8 we noticed some discrepancies in the way he studied; downloading class topics. This is when we noticed class notes were minimal. Entering high school we had him identified and put on an IEP so that he could access teachers' notes. This has been to no avail. He spent 20 + hours studying for exams and walked away with 60s. So back to psychologist we went who diagnosed him with SCT and also advised that the Concerta may not be working.
I am not saying I dont believe in SCT but as far as I know it hasnt been officially been recognized by the DSM has it? Its always been something I thought was at least limited to adults. What makes you think its sct vs PI?

We switched to Vyvanse 50mgx1. But he may not yet be on the right dosage. He gets very distracted while doing h/w. Does not finish simple in class tasks. He is having temper tantrums that he was never prone to. He just spent the weekend studying for a unit test yet forgot the material he studied. I don't think Vyvanse is working. But with the new diagnoses could it be he just isn't registering the lessons? We tried to get a smarten for him but our school board has an issue as it may have an impact on the teachers if something said is taken out of context. Anyone have any accommodations that assist the working memory other than meds?? Tx.

What is a smarten?

Caco3girl
10-10-17, 08:18 AM
I am not saying I dont believe in SCT but as far as I know it hasnt been officially been recognized by the DSM has it? Its always been something I thought was at least limited to adults. What makes you think its sct vs PI?



What is a smarten?

Spell check got her. She meant a smart PEN. It records as the kid takes notes and when a kid puts the smart pen back on the section of notes he took he can hear the teacher talking...i.e. the pen goes back and replays what the teacher said during that moment.

maple17
11-20-17, 09:39 PM
Following.

We're looking for answers with my son (10) and waiting to see the developmental paediatrician who diagnosed his sister. His teacher has no concerns, the usual story. He's in extension maths, but his writing is really not to his grade level. Trying to get him to write a sentence or two is like pulling teeth. Had him evaluated for dyslexia and dysgraphia due to family history of it and that was negative. His WISC and WIAT were surprising. The WISC had four categories where he was over 95th percentile (including 99th percentile in the fluid reasoning index) and then the processing speed and working memory were around the 30th percentile. So, there is something going on. I'm also going to ask the paediatrician about DCD due to a number of motor skills issues.

No behavioural issues whatsoever. The guy is a gem. Social, kind, empathetic, easy going, a ton of friends. Everyone adores him and remarks on how he is mature beyond his years. He is definitely more mature than his 13 year-old sister. I've arranged for a session with a psychologist we trust and use often just to make sure that we're not missing any underlying anxiety from the uneven cognitive profile.

I'm wondering if it does come back as ADD, is it worth waiting on the meds until later? As we are having zero behavioural issues (besides the absent minded professor routine), I'm not sure it's as vital immediately as it was with his sister who had so many impulse issues and emotional regulation challenges that home life was pretty tough. And it's taken us a while to get the balance right with his sister and we still have up and down days and some afternoon rough spots when it wears off. He doesn't seem bothered by anything at school at this stage, but I know as the workload increases in grade 6 and into high school, he might start finding it tough to keep up. That's when his sister struggled and his processing scores were on par with hers.

Caco3girl
11-21-17, 09:42 AM
Following.

We're looking for answers with my son (10) and waiting to see the developmental paediatrician who diagnosed his sister. His teacher has no concerns, the usual story. He's in extension maths, but his writing is really not to his grade level. Trying to get him to write a sentence or two is like pulling teeth. Had him evaluated for dyslexia and dysgraphia due to family history of it and that was negative. His WISC and WIAT were surprising. The WISC had four categories where he was over 95th percentile (including 99th percentile in the fluid reasoning index) and then the processing speed and working memory were around the 30th percentile. So, there is something going on. I'm also going to ask the paediatrician about DCD due to a number of motor skills issues.

No behavioural issues whatsoever. The guy is a gem. Social, kind, empathetic, easy going, a ton of friends. Everyone adores him and remarks on how he is mature beyond his years. He is definitely more mature than his 13 year-old sister. I've arranged for a session with a psychologist we trust and use often just to make sure that we're not missing any underlying anxiety from the uneven cognitive profile.

I'm wondering if it does come back as ADD, is it worth waiting on the meds until later? As we are having zero behavioural issues (besides the absent minded professor routine), I'm not sure it's as vital immediately as it was with his sister who had so many impulse issues and emotional regulation challenges that home life was pretty tough. And it's taken us a while to get the balance right with his sister and we still have up and down days and some afternoon rough spots when it wears off. He doesn't seem bothered by anything at school at this stage, but I know as the workload increases in grade 6 and into high school, he might start finding it tough to keep up. That's when his sister struggled and his processing scores were on par with hers.

It's not just school that gets harder, it is puberty! My son did the absent minded professor thing as well and it got SOOO much worse once puberty got a hold. He went from being forgetful to a total space cadet complete with me waiving my hand in front of his face to say HELLO!!! Can you hear me???? By 7th grade he just wasn't there most of the time, I had to have him repeat instructions back to me THREE times before I was sure he got it.

He was officially diagnosed in 8th grade and put on meds. The day he said to me "Why do you keep telling me things so many times, I GET IT!, please stop treating me like I'm dumb"....I could have cried tears of joy! I wasn't consciously doing it anymore, it's just how I have talked to him for so long and well, he didn't notice before. The fact that he did now made me realize what a change the meds had brought, it was awesome!

maple17
12-09-17, 04:52 PM
We have the appointment with the developmental paediatrician for Mr 9 this week. Is there any difference with regards to the diagnostic process with ADD-PI? I assume it'll be the rounds of forms for us and the teacher. I've already had a WIAT and WISC completed that I'll bring (we can see that there is a massive discrepancy between his scores on reasoning and working memory/processing speed). His scores for processing speed are the same as his sister's and she has a learning plan in place to help address this, so I'm hoping to do the same for him. His working memory scores are lower than hers too. His cognitive profile was pretty uneven, with many areas around 95th percentile and some around 30th.

I've also got a letter from the psychologist and will have a report from the OT (we're also looking into DCD/dyspraxia which according to what I've read is often comorbid with ADHD).

He does not have any behavioural issues (like his sister has). None of the impulsiveness or emotional regulation challenges. No one at school thinks there's any problems. His teacher says he's lovely. Chatty, friendly, easy going. Day dreamer. Makes careless errors. You know the story.

sarahsweets
12-10-17, 06:58 AM
We have the appointment with the developmental paediatrician for Mr 9 this week. Is there any difference with regards to the diagnostic process with ADD-PI? I assume it'll be the rounds of forms for us and the teacher. I've already had a WIAT and WISC completed that I'll bring (we can see that there is a massive discrepancy between his scores on reasoning and working memory/processing speed). His scores for processing speed are the same as his sister's and she has a learning plan in place to help address this, so I'm hoping to do the same for him. His working memory scores are lower than hers too. His cognitive profile was pretty uneven, with many areas around 95th percentile and some around 30th.
Who did all of these developmental tests? There are often differences that are noticeable between certain areas with adhd kids. Does he have an IEP or is that what you are trying to get?
]quote]
He does not have any behavioural issues (like his sister has). None of the impulsiveness or emotional regulation challenges. No one at school thinks there's any problems. His teacher says he's lovely. Chatty, friendly, easy going. [/quote]
Not all kids have to be behavior problems to have adhd.

maple17
12-10-17, 05:12 PM
The psychologist who administered his sister's assessments did his as well.

Yes, getting a learning plan is one of the goals. The school will not implement one without a diagnosis.

sarahsweets
12-11-17, 05:19 AM
I didnt use the quote function very well, sorry. I was curious to know if the school did these tests or if they were all private.My concern is the teacher might not be in your corner if there are no behavior issues. A lot of times if a child doesnt disrupt class its hard for teachers to give an accurate account of the troubles a child has.

maple17
12-11-17, 05:09 PM
I didnt use the quote function very well, sorry. I was curious to know if the school did these tests or if they were all private.My concern is the teacher might not be in your corner if there are no behavior issues. A lot of times if a child doesnt disrupt class its hard for teachers to give an accurate account of the troubles a child has.

So true. Even with my daughter who has the challenges with emotional regulation and impulsivity, she didn't raise any red flags at school and her teacher didn't notice anything until she had to fill out all the forms and reflect on each question and then when I compared the teacher's submission and mine at the time of handing them over to the paed, they more or less matched.

I have no doubt my son's teacher doesn't see an issue with him at all. He performs at standard, bit careless with his work and makes errors, chatty, but not disruptive. It's only now with the cognitive assessments complete and psych evaluation that we can see there is definitely something worth looking into and getting the appropriate supports if required.

Caco3girl
12-12-17, 11:03 AM
My now 15 year old is ADHD-PI, his lowest scores are in reading. Specifically having to recall something that he has read and answer questions about it. They also did a test where they showed him several pictures and gave the people in the pictures names, then put them away, talked for a bit, then brought them out and asked him for the names...he couldn't do it. Then there was remember these 3 words....10 minutes later he could remember the first one was a way to get around (bus) but couldn't remember what it was. The second was a fruit he liked, but he couldn't remember which one (apple), the third was actually the word house, but he said home.

I personally think there is more going on with him than just ADHD, he uses substitute words in his head...it's very frustrating for him. It's like playing the game telephone and always getting it just a little wrong. I didn't explore it further because after a year of teachers scales, my scales, the doctors observations...etc. they gave him an IEP. I hear it's rare to get one for ADHD alone, but it happened for him middle of 9th grade, and just in time. I truly think he would have left school by now if he didn't get the IEP and co-taught classes that help keep him focused so school isn't SO overwhelming for him any more.

maple17
12-12-17, 10:26 PM
My now 15 year old is ADHD-PI, his lowest scores are in reading. Specifically having to recall something that he has read and answer questions about it. They also did a test where they showed him several pictures and gave the people in the pictures names, then put them away, talked for a bit, then brought them out and asked him for the names...he couldn't do it. Then there was remember these 3 words....10 minutes later he could remember the first one was a way to get around (bus) but couldn't remember what it was. The second was a fruit he liked, but he couldn't remember which one (apple), the third was actually the word house, but he said home.

I personally think there is more going on with him than just ADHD, he uses substitute words in his head...it's very frustrating for him. It's like playing the game telephone and always getting it just a little wrong. I didn't explore it further because after a year of teachers scales, my scales, the doctors observations...etc. they gave him an IEP. I hear it's rare to get one for ADHD alone, but it happened for him middle of 9th grade, and just in time. I truly think he would have left school by now if he didn't get the IEP and co-taught classes that help keep him focused so school isn't SO overwhelming for him any more.

Aw, I think it's often tough enough for our boys in traditional school as is, and then the ADD makes it even more tricky. I'm glad that you got the IEP in place and with that extra support, it makes a huge difference.

We're off to the paediatrician this afternoon. I've got the OT's report to bring with me. She's the expert in her field and she was pretty blunt with some of her language. She reckons he's easily distracted, restless, has difficulty with organisation, and she was quite detailed about his particular motor skills deficits and problems with visio-motor fluency. I also have the letter from the psychologist and his test results (WIAT/WISC). So, looks to me like ADHD and DCD/dyspraxia, but will see what the paed says. I think there's more than enough to warrant further investigation and a possible learning plan for next year. We also need a diagnosis to access funding for continuing OT (which the therapist thinks he definitely requires).

maple17
12-13-17, 05:12 AM
Result: looks like kid #2 with ADHD. She read all the reports and we were there for an hour and based on the reports, her observations, and the family history, said it's very likely Mr 9 has it as well. She did note hyperactivity in the form of swinging feet, chair rocking, fidgeting etc. I guess I'm used to it and don't even see it. He doesn't have any emotional regulation issues and not much in terms of impulsivity, so different from his sister in that regard.

Meds trial in January, during our summer holidays. I'm not even phased by it. One kid was a surprise. I was expecting this actually ever since I saw the WISC results and noted how since the school year went on, his working memory just seemed to struggle at times. I do hope he fares as well as she did in terms of no side effects (besides her weight). Because he has no behavioural issues, I'm a bit more leery of how it will go. We would be doing meds mainly to help with school.

Oh and likely DCD as well with funded OT for him.

Caco3girl
12-13-17, 09:33 AM
Result: looks like kid #2 with ADHD. She read all the reports and we were there for an hour and based on the reports, her observations, and the family history, said it's very likely Mr 9 has it as well. She did note hyperactivity in the form of swinging feet, chair rocking, fidgeting etc. I guess I'm used to it and don't even see it. He doesn't have any emotional regulation issues and not much in terms of impulsivity, so different from his sister in that regard.

Meds trial in January, during our summer holidays. I'm not even phased by it. One kid was a surprise. I was expecting this actually ever since I saw the WISC results and noted how since the school year went on, his working memory just seemed to struggle at times. I do hope he fares as well as she did in terms of no side effects (besides her weight). Because he has no behavioural issues, I'm a bit more leery of how it will go. We would be doing meds mainly to help with school.

Oh and likely DCD as well with funded OT for him.

Don't be surprised if the impulse control issues develop around puberty. My son did some tapping and feet swinging, nothing major until age 11/12. Then the phrase "think before you do something" became our house mantra. He spent over a month in in school suspension in 8th grade for the craziest crap I have ever heard of BUT he broke school policy so they had to reprimand him, repeatedly.

My favorite occurred last year, age 14, 9th grade. A girl sat in his lunch spot, he had put down his bags, and the girl said she wanted to sit there, but he said no he was. He left to get his lunch, came back and the girl had pushed his stuff to the floor and was sitting there. He couldn't accept that she was sitting there and told her to move. She didn't. So he phsycially picked her up very gently, and moved her to the table behind them, and then sat down and ate. The girl then got so mad she hit him in the head...he continued to eat. Her friend came up and poured water over him, he continued to eat. The lunch proctors hauled them all into the VP's office and they reviewed the video. The VP was very nice when he called, even chuckling a bit. He said he understood it was an impulse control issue, but they couldn't have a student bodily moving another student, but commended him for not reacting to the hit or the water and those girls got way more than 1 day of ISS. But yeah, that is a good example of the impulse control issues my son has. Not violent, but definitely not thinking before he acts.

sarahsweets
12-13-17, 10:41 AM
Don't be surprised if the impulse control issues develop around puberty. My son did some tapping and feet swinging, nothing major until age 11/12. Then the phrase "think before you do something" became our house mantra. He spent over a month in in school suspension in 8th grade for the craziest crap I have ever heard of BUT he broke school policy so they had to reprimand him, repeatedly.

My favorite occurred last year, age 14, 9th grade. A girl sat in his lunch spot, he had put down his bags, and the girl said she wanted to sit there, but he said no he was. He left to get his lunch, came back and the girl had pushed his stuff to the floor and was sitting there. He couldn't accept that she was sitting there and told her to move. She didn't. So he phsycially picked her up very gently, and moved her to the table behind them, and then sat down and ate. The girl then got so mad she hit him in the head...he continued to eat. Her friend came up and poured water over him, he continued to eat. The lunch proctors hauled them all into the VP's office and they reviewed the video. The VP was very nice when he called, even chuckling a bit. He said he understood it was an impulse control issue, but they couldn't have a student bodily moving another student, but commended him for not reacting to the hit or the water and those girls got way more than 1 day of ISS. But yeah, that is a good example of the impulse control issues my son has. Not violent, but definitely not thinking before he acts.

I cant believe those jerks did that to him! He must have EXCELLENT impulse control to avoid pounding them into the floor.

Caco3girl
12-13-17, 12:17 PM
I cant believe those jerks did that to him! He must have EXCELLENT impulse control to avoid pounding them into the floor.
LOL, well yeah, it happened. The thing with my son is that he doesn't think ahead for repercussions, he is more of a "I won't make that mistake again" type of learner. He misses a lot of social cues, so he has to rely on experience. We covered the options of what to do if someone hits you, or pours food or drink on you....we did NOT cover bodily moving people who were annoying you, lol, but we have now!

I personally think the girl was attempting to flirt. I think it just went really wrong when he didn't understand she was flirting.

maple17
12-13-17, 02:36 PM
I think it was pretty amazing that your son kept it together when they hit him and poured water on him. Omg. I did read it though and see my son acting pretty much the same way. His sister is more of the instant lash back with equal measure, although meds have helped this tremendously.

Thanks for the heads up re the impulse control at puberty. Gosh, puberty and ADHD, fun times.

I hope the meds help him with school. I'm pretty easy going about grades and just ask that they work to their potential. The paed noted from his scores and reports that he's very bright, but the ADHD is impacting how that is demonstrated. And my son is also starting to realise this when he told the psych that his brain gets tired trying to write and that he forgets what he is supposed to do. It's contributing to a sense of anxiety and starting to be more present on his radar, so best we address it now.

Caco3girl
12-13-17, 04:17 PM
I think it was pretty amazing that your son kept it together when they hit him and poured water on him. Omg. I did read it though and see my son acting pretty much the same way. His sister is more of the instant lash back with equal measure, although meds have helped this tremendously.

Thanks for the heads up re the impulse control at puberty. Gosh, puberty and ADHD, fun times.

I hope the meds help him with school. I'm pretty easy going about grades and just ask that they work to their potential. The paed noted from his scores and reports that he's very bright, but the ADHD is impacting how that is demonstrated. And my son is also starting to realise this when he told the psych that his brain gets tired trying to write and that he forgets what he is supposed to do. It's contributing to a sense of anxiety and starting to be more present on his radar, so best we address it now.

When my son hit 5th grade his grades started to drop. Ability and willingness to do the work was a constant war.

The rule for my son is that he has to have an average of 80% in his core classes (English, math, science, social studies) or he's grounded. Now that could mean he has a 70 in reading and a 90 in math and all the others are 80% and he's fine. He finds it comforting to know if he's doing poorly in one class I'm not going to ground him, he just has to work extra hard in other classes to make up for the deficit.