View Full Version : Quitting smoking


Hermus
04-28-17, 07:49 AM
Just to keep me on the right track and not to put it off, I hereby announce that May 1 2017 will be the date I will quit smoking. So on April 30 I will smoke my last cigarette, to then give it up for good.

Some important reasons to quit:

Smoking increases my anxiety
Smoking is bad for my health and my physical shape
Smoking costs a lot of money
Smoking causes cancer
Smoking ages the skin

What I'm going to do instead of smoking:
Meditation, taking a few deep breaths every time I want to smoke
Reach out to people (phone, internet etc.)
Walking
Drinking tea
Healthy eating

Ready for the next challenge in living healthy

Unmanagable
04-28-17, 07:54 AM
Congrats, Herm. That was my chosen nicotine quit date, too, 11 years ago. You can do it!!

ElectraHeart
04-28-17, 10:22 AM
Gum really helps too!!
Keeps your mouth stimulated!!
I think it's good when you feel anxious too.

aeon
04-28-17, 10:56 AM
And that was my day of sobriety, in 2001. :yes:

I wish you well, Hermus. http://www.sympato.ch/smileys/Yaisse.gif

I do not smoke, but I do vape.

Nicotine minus the physical components, the burning, and the components produced while burning can be a pleasure.


Cheers,
Ian

sarahsweets
04-28-17, 11:37 AM
Good luck to you Hermus. You are brave to undertake such a thing when you are still newly sober. I hope it works out. Sadly I am still not there yet. I am so afraid that stopping will make me want to drink. Even though I have a solid sober life, there is a part of me that wonders if I will always need to be addicted to something and its a matter of harm reduction. I was told major changes are viable at five years. I was told not major changes the first year and life overhaul changes at five. The reason being that you have managed to live sober enough time that its almost like it had always been that way. That means I have less then a year left before five years.

Hermus
04-28-17, 12:02 PM
Good luck to you Hermus. You are brave to undertake such a thing when you are still newly sober. I hope it works out. Sadly I am still not there yet. I am so afraid that stopping will make me want to drink. Even though I have a solid sober life, there is a part of me that wonders if I will always need to be addicted to something and its a matter of harm reduction. I was told major changes are viable at five years. I was told not major changes the first year and life overhaul changes at five. The reason being that you have managed to live sober enough time that its almost like it had always been that way. That means I have less then a year left before five years.

To me quitting is not such a major change. Before I went sober almost seven months ago, I had quitted smoking for one and a half year. Only after that I picked up again. I do take into account that my cravings for alcohol might increase somewhat, but from the position where I am now I think that I can deal with them.

dvdnvwls
04-28-17, 12:56 PM
Looking forward to your new better-smelling forum posts. :D

psychopathetic
04-28-17, 04:42 PM
Dude...MUCH respect for you! It sounds like you're quitting for yourself too...which is really important. It's hard to stick to a quit when you're doing it for anyone other than your own self.

Quitting is one of the best things I've ever done for myself. It was a HUGE self-esteem booster for me and damn...it's hella nice not to be chained down to the nasty sticks anymore.
It does take some time...I had to white knuckle my way through many a crave...but given enough time...you'll start to realize how much easier it gets. You'll be sitting there and come a realization, that you haven't had a real crave...in weeks!

My advice is to love your quit. Be proud of it...brag about it, cheer for yourself, celebrate it. Treat it like a friend instead of your enemy.

And don't think you have to go it alone either...quitnet.com is a site that helped me TREMENDOUSLY during my quit. The site is set up completely differently now...but there's still thousands of active members who are there every hour of every single day fully ready to give out wonderful support. It's actually really lovely for me to stop by once in awhile, cause there's still people active I knew years ago when I myself was a daily active member. I love those people! <3
Also...don't be afraid to give others advice and support if you can! Doing so can really help strengthen your own commitment!

I'm happy for you!
Just stick with it...and I promise it gets SO much easier in time!
Another piece of advice early on that helped me...was someone telling me that the physical craves only last for less than a minute. That's it. You just have to get through that 1 minute...and then after that you should be able to distract yourself to switch your focus (which is important).

Oh...and also...you're going to find that you have a WHOLE heck of a lot more spare time as well. I like the ideas you already have in place, especially the walking. That did a lot for me early in my quit.

(((((((Herms)))))))

I'd wish you luck...but luck isn't what you need here. So instead I'll wish you pride! Be proud of what you're doing and this WILL be your forever quit! :D

N.O.P.E.
Not One Puff Ever

fisherfisher
04-28-17, 07:58 PM
Good for you man! I was just over on killthecan kicking around the idea of quitting dip or at least cutting back but I always come up with compelling excuses to put it off

Fuzzy12
04-28-17, 08:42 PM
Best wishes from me too. Walking helped me tons as well. Everytime I craved a cigarette or felt restless I took a walk. Whenever possible. Sometimes even just getting up fr my desk and getting a glass of water helped. I also did time of other exercise. Swimming, squash, etc..it was really fun till I sprained my ankle big time and was on crutches for 3 months. ...:lol:

Anyway I digress....:scratch:

So just:
:grouphug:

Letching Gray
04-28-17, 10:34 PM
Congrats, Herm. That was my chosen nicotine quit date, too, 11 years ago. You can do it!!


Congratulations Unm

Letching Gray
04-28-17, 10:36 PM
Good luck to you Hermus. You are brave to undertake such a thing when you are still newly sober. I hope it works out. Sadly I am still not there yet. I am so afraid that stopping will make me want to drink. Even though I have a solid sober life, there is a part of me that wonders if I will always need to be addicted to something and its a matter of harm reduction. I was told major changes are viable at five years. I was told not major changes the first year and life overhaul changes at five. The reason being that you have managed to live sober enough time that its almost like it had always been that way. That means I have less then a year left before five years.


You can do anything you decide you are going to do. :goodpost::grouphug: and then some

Letching Gray
04-28-17, 10:39 PM
To me quitting is not such a major change. Before I went sober almost seven months ago, I had quitted smoking for one and a half year. Only after that I picked up again. I do take into account that my cravings for alcohol might increase somewhat, but from the position where I am now I think that I can deal with them.

Almost 7 months ago!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

And this moment!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!:grouphug:

Hermus
04-29-17, 02:19 PM
I'm considering piling up on junk food for the first few days from Monday. It should help me to get through my worst withdrawal.

Hermus
04-29-17, 04:32 PM
Okay. My supermarket has chicken strips, green salad and B&Js on sale from Monday. Exactly what I would choose as my last meal, or what I would eat if I quit smoking. This can't be a coincidence.

Fuzzy12
04-29-17, 05:25 PM
B&J?

Bacon and jelly?
Beans and jam?
Brownies and jack fruit?
Brandy and jack Daniels?
Beer and juniper berries?

:scratch:

Unmanagable
04-29-17, 05:50 PM
Ben and Jerry's?

Fuzzy12
04-29-17, 06:48 PM
Ben and Jerry's?

Oh..:doh:

Unmanagable
04-29-17, 06:57 PM
Oh..:doh:

The brownies and jack fruit was my favorite. I could almost taste it. lol

Little Missy
04-29-17, 07:11 PM
My grandma used to walk around with a carrot stick in her mouth to simulate a cigarette, but by the end of the day it was discoloured and limp.

Hermus
04-30-17, 07:44 AM
Just smoked my last cigarette :yes:

Hermus
04-30-17, 02:28 PM
7 hours from my last two cigarettes and already experiencing quite some cravings.

Letching Gray
04-30-17, 07:20 PM
7 hours from my last two cigarettes and already experiencing quite some cravings.

It is a nasty habit to try to quit. I mean for me it was. My cravings and nuttiness did pass, though:grouphug:. I couldn't imagine life without smoking then and I can't imagine wanting a cigarette now.

Andrew Well M.D. wrote a book about addictions and said that quitting inhaling cigarette smoke is one of the very toughest of all, comparing it to the addictive potency of heroin. :grouphug:

Hermus
05-01-17, 02:06 AM
It is a nasty habit to try to quit. I mean for me it was. My cravings and nuttiness did pass, though:grouphug:. I couldn't imagine life without smoking then and I can't imagine wanting a cigarette now.

Andrew Well M.D. wrote a book about addictions and said that quitting inhaling cigarette smoke is one of the very toughest of all, comparing it to the addictive potency of heroin. :grouphug:

Been there before. Until 7 months ago I didn't smoke for 1,5 years. The first few days after quitting were tough, but then things got better. I haven't done it completely cold turkey then, which I am intending to do now. After two days I got some snus a fellow student brought from Sweden (kind of tobacco to put behind the upper lip). So I used it. After the can was finished I managed to stop much more easily.

Three more reasons to stop smoking:

Smoking causes sexual dysfunction
Smoking leads to a hoarse voice
Smoking causes bad teeth

Fuzzy12
05-01-17, 04:33 AM
For me the biggest motivation was to stop stinking all the time. Smoking makes you smell of tobacco nonstop and it's impossible to get that smell out. Now that I've quit I notice it even more how strong the smell.smell . of tobacco really is.

Unmanagable
05-01-17, 08:21 AM
I remember the first day I quit. I planned it down to the last cig in my pack. Saved it for my morning coffee. After work that day, I was craving so bad I went by the store and grabbed a pack of menthols, which I didn't much care for, thinking it would be easier to ignore them if I didn't truly like them.

I stuck them on top of the fridge as my emergency pack. But knowing they were there was torturous. I ended up opening the pack, taking one out and smelling it repeatedly, holding my lighter in the other hand...almost firing it up, and I finally told myself "hell to the no!"

I wasn't going to let the cigs kick my a** so I took them out to the dumpster at my apartment building and tossed them in. I refused to dumpster dive for them. That was just the first day. It got much worse before it got better. lol

Hermus
05-01-17, 09:50 AM
I remember the first day I quit. I planned it down to the last cig in my pack. Saved it for my morning coffee. After work that day, I was craving so bad I went by the store and grabbed a pack of menthols, which I didn't much care for, thinking it would be easier to ignore them if I didn't truly like them.

The first time I quit I didn't plan it at all actually. I had a conversation during the break with a friend about actually wanting to quit. After the break I thought: "Well, if I want to quit, why wouldn't I do it now?" So I threw my cigarettes away immediately. In the half year after that I smoked a cigarette every few months and after that didn't smoke for a year. Until I got off alcohol and picked up again.

This time I actually planned to do it today, but I was installing a stop smoking app yesterday. I had to fill in a stop date and I thought how ridiculous it was to still smoke, while I wanted to stop. So I smoked two more cigarettes and after that I gave my brother my cigarettes.

I stuck them on top of the fridge as my emergency pack. But knowing they were there was torturous. I ended up opening the pack, taking one out and smelling it repeatedly, holding my lighter in the other hand...almost firing it up, and I finally told myself "hell to the no!"

I wasn't going to let the cigs kick my a** so I took them out to the dumpster at my apartment building and tossed them in. I refused to dumpster dive for them. That was just the first day. It got much worse before it got better. lol

I think I will manage not to smoke today, and probably tomorrow and the day after that. But I do feel a lot of cravings today. That's only a sign the healthy me is fighting my addiction. So that's awesome. I also notice that I'm more distracted and had difficulties meditating today.

Hermus
05-03-17, 09:55 AM
Three days without smoking and like yesterday I feel lethargic, unmotivated, have difficulty focusing and getting to do things. This morning the thought started to occur that life in recovery was so boring. One of the thoughts that might lead to relapse. I was invited to view a home to which I had applied to live there. It was 14 km away, so I cycled there. That brought some calm to my mind. I started to realize that the feeling of boredom and the cravings came from a lack of dopamine. Cycling really helped to increase dopamine levels and I felt a bit better. But still it's hard getting tasks done. I'll just have to sit this out for now and things will probably start to get better in the coming days.

aeon
05-03-17, 10:48 AM
If you want to stop all of it, I can appreciate that.

But if you want some nicotine without all the rest, consider vaping.

https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4171/33586652654_1c0ca071eb_o.png
(https://flic.kr/p/TaWnGb)triade250_advocate27 (https://flic.kr/p/TaWnGb) by aeon314159 (https://www.flickr.com/photos/25942094@N05/), on Flickr

Works for me! http://www.sympato.ch/smileys/Yaisse.gif


Cheers,
Ian

Hermus
05-03-17, 12:27 PM
If you want to stop all of it, I can appreciate that.

But if you want some nicotine without all the rest, consider vaping.

https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4171/33586652654_1c0ca071eb_o.png
(https://flic.kr/p/TaWnGb)triade250_advocate27 (https://flic.kr/p/TaWnGb) by aeon314159 (https://www.flickr.com/photos/25942094@N05/), on Flickr

Works for me! http://www.sympato.ch/smileys/Yaisse.gif


Cheers,
Ian

Some reasons for me to quit are expenses and that nicotine causes anxiety in me. Both not things that a vape is going to help with. I think they're awesome, but not for me. And it would be a shame because if I would take nicotine now I would have gone through 3 days of withdrawal for nothing.