View Full Version : Dextroaphetamine 15mg 3 times a day no focus


Daniela23
05-05-17, 02:29 PM
I got perscribed dex 3 times a day at 15 mg for adhd and im in school and i feel no focus. if i drink a rock star with my first dose i feel a little bit. if i take my doses two hours a part i can get my home work done. it still takes me all day to do my school work or an exam.
ive tried every other kind of medication you can think of an the only thing that ever had the smallest effect was dex.
does anyone know how to boost the affects without a rock star?
maybe eating different or a different dose?
or something other than a sugar free rock star?

sarahsweets
05-05-17, 03:53 PM
I got perscribed dex 3 times a day at 15 mg for adhd and im in school and i feel no focus.

Have you told your doctor? What does he or she say?

if i drink a rock star with my first dose i feel a little bit. if i take my doses two hours a part i can get my home work done. it still takes me all day to do my school work or an exam.what do you mean by all day?Are you supposed to take your doses every two hours? That seems unusual and combined with the caffeine in a rock star, I cant imagine what your poor heart must feel like.

ive tried every other kind of medication you can think of an the only thing that ever had the smallest effect was dex.
does anyone know how to boost the affects without a rock star?
maybe eating different or a different dose?
or something other than a sugar free rock star?

it sounds like you are looking to potentiate which isnt the same thing as seeing your doctor for a problem.

Friendlyriver
05-06-17, 09:57 PM
I wouldn't try to potentiate or take other stuff to make it work better. I would continue to try to find the dose that works.

Make sure you communicate with your doc. Be completely honest.
Have you already tried other meds? Also how long have you been taking dexedrine? have you tried the spansules as well as the ir? Lots of stuff to think about. I know its frustrating.

sarahsweets
05-18-17, 02:52 AM
I wouldn't try to potentiate or take other stuff to make it work better. I would continue to try to find the dose that works.

Make sure you communicate with your doc. Be completely honest.
Have you already tried other meds? Also how long have you been taking dexedrine? have you tried the spansules as well as the ir? Lots of stuff to think about. I know its frustrating.

Looks like we had another drive-by, lol.

b3nault
05-23-17, 12:28 AM
I got perscribed dex 3 times a day at 15 mg for adhd and im in school and i feel no focus. if i drink a rock star with my first dose i feel a little bit. if i take my doses two hours a part i can get my home work done. it still takes me all day to do my school work or an exam.
ive tried every other kind of medication you can think of an the only thing that ever had the smallest effect was dex.
does anyone know how to boost the affects without a rock star?
maybe eating different or a different dose?
or something other than a sugar free rock star?

I am prescribed the same amount and had the same issue. Grass fed beef heart (in capsules) was my solution. I'm assuming it's the CoQ10, but whatever it is, it is my saving grace. Sounds odd, but could be worth a try.

Simargl
05-23-17, 10:26 AM
My doctor told me coq10 is expensive snake oil. Everyone has their opinion though--Talk to your doctor before taking supplements. You never know how it will interact. It's possible he energy drinks are zapping the effectiveness of Dex.

sarahsweets
05-23-17, 11:32 AM
I am prescribed the same amount and had the same issue. Grass fed beef heart (in capsules) was my solution. I'm assuming it's the CoQ10, but whatever it is, it is my saving grace. Sounds odd, but could be worth a try.

I get really prickly when people mention a supplement and state that they take it and are fine without even considering the fact that people might blindly take it without a doctor's approval.

Aside from being pedaled by Dr Oz (which is always suspect) There is a litany of warnings and interactions listed by the Mayo Clinic.
Most notable:

Interactions with Drugs

CoQ10 may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with drugs that increase the risk of bleeding. Some examples include aspirin, anticoagulants ("blood thinners") such as warfarin (Coumadin®) or heparin, anti-platelet drugs such as clopidogrel (Plavix®), and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®) or naproxen (Naprosyn®, Aleve®). CoQ10 may also reduce the effectiveness of warfarin, which will increase risk of blood clot.

CoQ10 may affect blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using medications that may also affect blood sugar. People taking drugs for diabetes by mouth or insulin should be monitored closely by a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist. Medication adjustments may be necessary.

CoQ10 may cause low blood pressure. Caution is advised in people taking drugs that affect blood pressure.

CoQ10 may also interact with acetylsalicylic acid, agents that may affect the immune system, agents that may affect the nervous system, agents that may enhance exercise performance, agents that may promote urination, agents that may treat asthma, agents that may treat mental illnesses, agents that may treat HIV, Alzheimer's agents, amiodarone, amitriptyline, anabolic androgenic steroids, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, anticancer agents, antidepressants, antifungal agents, anti-inflammatories, beta-blockers, cholesterol-lowering agents, clonidine, corticosteroids, cyclosporin A, dopamine agonists/antagonists, doxorubicin, eye agents, ezetimibe, fenofibrate, fertility agents, heart agents, heart rate-regulating agents, hormonal agents, hydralazine, immunoglobulins, iridium, lung agents, mercury, methyldopa, nicotine, nitroglycerin, orlistat, P-glycoprotein-regulated agents, skin agents, statins, steroids, thyroid hormones, timolol, and weight loss agents.

I only highlighted a few that would apply to people that have adhd.

b3nault
05-23-17, 06:32 PM
Beef heart (organs/offal) is food, not a synthetic supplement. I don't need a doctors advice or permission to choose what foods I eat.


I get really prickly when people mention a supplement and state that they take it and are fine without even considering the fact that people might blindly take it without a doctor's approval.

Aside from being pedaled by Dr Oz (which is always suspect) There is a litany of warnings and interactions listed by the Mayo Clinic.
Most notable:

Interactions with Drugs

CoQ10 may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with drugs that increase the risk of bleeding. Some examples include aspirin, anticoagulants ("blood thinners") such as warfarin (Coumadin®) or heparin, anti-platelet drugs such as clopidogrel (Plavix®), and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®) or naproxen (Naprosyn®, Aleve®). CoQ10 may also reduce the effectiveness of warfarin, which will increase risk of blood clot.

CoQ10 may affect blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using medications that may also affect blood sugar. People taking drugs for diabetes by mouth or insulin should be monitored closely by a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist. Medication adjustments may be necessary.

CoQ10 may cause low blood pressure. Caution is advised in people taking drugs that affect blood pressure.

CoQ10 may also interact with acetylsalicylic acid, agents that may affect the immune system, agents that may affect the nervous system, agents that may enhance exercise performance, agents that may promote urination, agents that may treat asthma, agents that may treat mental illnesses, agents that may treat HIV, Alzheimer's agents, amiodarone, amitriptyline, anabolic androgenic steroids, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, anticancer agents, antidepressants, antifungal agents, anti-inflammatories, beta-blockers, cholesterol-lowering agents, clonidine, corticosteroids, cyclosporin A, dopamine agonists/antagonists, doxorubicin, eye agents, ezetimibe, fenofibrate, fertility agents, heart agents, heart rate-regulating agents, hormonal agents, hydralazine, immunoglobulins, iridium, lung agents, mercury, methyldopa, nicotine, nitroglycerin, orlistat, P-glycoprotein-regulated agents, skin agents, statins, steroids, thyroid hormones, timolol, and weight loss agents.

I only highlighted a few that would apply to people that have adhd.

b3nault
05-23-17, 06:43 PM
My doctor told me coq10 is expensive snake oil. Everyone has their opinion though--Talk to your doctor before taking supplements. You never know how it will interact. It's possible he energy drinks are zapping the effectiveness of Dex.

Beef heart is food, not a synthetic supplement.

sarahsweets
05-24-17, 05:08 AM
Beef heart (organs/offal) is food, not a synthetic supplement. I don't need a doctors advice or permission to choose what foods I eat.

Yes, but did you read what I posted? Are you frying up beef heart and eating it like a steak or are you taking it like you would take a vitamin?
Just because it is a food doesnt mean its safe to take without a doctor's approval.

cdp333
05-24-17, 09:21 AM
I get really prickly when people mention a supplement and state that they take it and are fine without even considering the fact that people might blindly take it without a doctor's approval.

Aside from being pedaled by Dr Oz (which is always suspect) There is a litany of warnings and interactions listed by the Mayo Clinic.
Most notable:

Interactions with Drugs

CoQ10 may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with drugs that increase the risk of bleeding. Some examples include aspirin, anticoagulants ("blood thinners") such as warfarin (Coumadin®) or heparin, anti-platelet drugs such as clopidogrel (Plavix®), and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®) or naproxen (Naprosyn®, Aleve®). CoQ10 may also reduce the effectiveness of warfarin, which will increase risk of blood clot.

CoQ10 may affect blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using medications that may also affect blood sugar. People taking drugs for diabetes by mouth or insulin should be monitored closely by a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist. Medication adjustments may be necessary.

CoQ10 may cause low blood pressure. Caution is advised in people taking drugs that affect blood pressure.

CoQ10 may also interact with acetylsalicylic acid, agents that may affect the immune system, agents that may affect the nervous system, agents that may enhance exercise performance, agents that may promote urination, agents that may treat asthma, agents that may treat mental illnesses, agents that may treat HIV, Alzheimer's agents, amiodarone, amitriptyline, anabolic androgenic steroids, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, anticancer agents, antidepressants, antifungal agents, anti-inflammatories, beta-blockers, cholesterol-lowering agents, clonidine, corticosteroids, cyclosporin A, dopamine agonists/antagonists, doxorubicin, eye agents, ezetimibe, fenofibrate, fertility agents, heart agents, heart rate-regulating agents, hormonal agents, hydralazine, immunoglobulins, iridium, lung agents, mercury, methyldopa, nicotine, nitroglycerin, orlistat, P-glycoprotein-regulated agents, skin agents, statins, steroids, thyroid hormones, timolol, and weight loss agents.

I only highlighted a few that would apply to people that have adhd.


I wanted to provide some additional information regarding the potential CoQ10- drug interactions.

The Mayo Clinic website you referenced above is a credible source for drug information, especially as it relates to potential drug interactions with Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10). It is important to note that in many cases clinical studies only suggest the potential for interactions and more research is needed to verify the results. This is particularly true for the above statements, such as, “may interact”, “may affect”, “may cause”, “may increase”, etc., as they relate to potential drug interactions with CoQ10. However, these Warnings and Precautions should be taken very seriously.

Therefore, you should always speak to your doctor or pharmacist regarding any prescription or over-the-counter medication, herbal supplements and vitamins you are currently taking or plan on taking and ask if CoQ10 supplements are right for you.

Additionally, for those who want to take CoQ10 and have cleared it with their health care provider, it’s important to note that not all CoQ10 supplements are the same. Be sure to choose one that is both water and fat-soluble which is better absorbed by the body than regular CoQ10.
(Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=Plasma+coenzyme+Q10+response+to+oral+ingesti on+of+coenzyme+Q10+formulation).

Please note that my comment is provided for informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read.

b3nault
05-26-17, 07:10 PM
Yes, but did you read what I posted? Are you frying up beef heart and eating it like a steak or are you taking it like you would take a vitamin?
Just because it is a food doesnt mean its safe to take without a doctor's approval.

Yes, I did. How it's consumed is a moot point though. Whether it's fried, boiled, eating straight up raw or dehydrated/encapsulated, it's still consuming a food. Nutrients/vitamins in food (i.e. Naturally occurring CoQ10 in beef heart) behave different in the body than isolated synthetic supplements. Food has all the other synergetic nutrients in it, things we are probably not even aware of. Beef heart makes me feel well, and is very synergetic with the Dexedrine. It also reversed my gum recession.

Western medicine/doctors are not educated on food/vitamins and supplements and how they work with the body. A prime example, is that they always prescribe vitamin D, without the cofactor vitamin K2 (mk-4/mk-7)...this is not only dangerous, but it is borderline negligent. Seeking their advice for this kind of stuff is pointless in my opinion.

I understand where you're coming from, and appreciate your concern. I'm glad you are here on the forum! :)

emperorpenguin
05-28-17, 01:18 PM
Just wanted to add, since OP asked about breakfast: high-protein is best, avoid acids (citrus fruits) and don't fear fat. Eggs, cottage cheese, etc. are great. Things that keep you full for a long time...it's healthiest in general and will also help prevent an initial spike when your meds kick in.

If you have food allergies or are just picky, you can supplement with a quality protein powder or something like a Clif bar. Just don't down a bowl of sugar and call it good, like a lot of people do. Definitely don't skip breakfast.

Kick the energy drinks, they are bad news. Aside from the sugar and/or artificial sweeteners which are both toxic...they have potentially dangerous levels of caffeine AND other stimulants that have not-well-understood interactions. Caffeine is safe at moderate levels, including with stimulant meds, but you've got to be careful. There have been deaths in young people associated with energy drinks.