View Full Version : Career advice


NateDEEzy
05-06-17, 10:51 AM
Does anyone in here feel like they fit well in the industry/ job they have? I'm in architecture and it's incredibly overwhelming. I don't think I'm going to be able to remain in the field as it's too stressful and complicated trying to manage all the different aspects of creating a building. I often thought that I'd be a much better fit for ONE of the fields related to architecture. Like I could maybe fit in a field where I'm able to apply myself to something very specific so I can learn it very well and be proficient at it. In architecture you have to juggle all of these fields and make them all fit together. I feel like it's almost impossible for someone with add-pi to keep up.

Ideally, I think I'd love to be able to do multiple things. I'd absolutely love to create YouTube videos of social experiments and interviews as I think I have a fairly unique but logical look on life, but I don't really know where to start or how to build an audience.

dvdnvwls
05-06-17, 11:16 AM
I might just be an old guy or something, but whenever someone suggests YouTube as part of a career change, I feel all cringe-y. It's like the person has seriously suggested that their new job should be hanging out at the craps tables in Vegas or something. :)

Obviously you have a ton of useful skills, considering what you're doing already. Are there certain ways you excel in the work you're doing now, even though your current job might be too much in some ways?

l_ruth_
05-06-17, 06:31 PM
I would love to be an academic but what you've described resonates with me as the overall sustained co-ordinations I think I will need to achieve this seems almost impossible. I love to research different things though also connected, and it kind of depresses me how I can't really stay on the single topic without shifting focus/shifting gears regularly. It's like the application I would need to be able to support myself in that profession may be simply too hard (though I hope not, and hope there is a way for me to find my way around these problems). Thank you for sharing. What kind of ADD do you have?

NateDEEzy
05-07-17, 01:28 PM
I would love to be an academic but what you've described resonates with me as the overall sustained co-ordinations I think I will need to achieve this seems almost impossible. I love to research different things though also connected, and it kind of depresses me how I can't really stay on the single topic without shifting focus/shifting gears regularly. It's like the application I would need to be able to support myself in that profession may be simply too hard (though I hope not, and hope there is a way for me to find my way around these problems). Thank you for sharing. What kind of ADD do you have?

I was diagnosed as not having ADD actually. but I don't think professionals really know what ADD PI even is. It's probably like a form of leanring diability or mild aspergers, which I dunno, I guess I have. I'm just very spacy and have terrible anxiety, which I dunno what you'd classify it as, but that's what I have. I've suffered a lot from it. People don't really like being around me, I think I make people feel uncomfortable bc I can't function at the social level that most can. And it's caused me to question life and investigate it, and bc of that, I feel live a unique perspective and I have a hard time sitting in front of a computer when I want to talk about and create content that opens people's eyes to what I think this life might be about.

EuropeanADHD
05-07-17, 02:53 PM
"In the end, is it a better lived life to amass a bunch of money and live for yourself, or be homeless and volunteer and help others? I think the world has been blinded by money and the way life is set up. "

Let me tell you, this changes for most of the people as they grow up. Normally in the age of about 25-35 years old. If you're younger than that you might not realize that yet.

Btw, if you're homeless you probably don't have the energy to help others. And you have to focus on not starving to death yourself and finding a warmer place to stay. So realistically speaking, helping others is probably quite low on your list of priorities.

NateDEEzy
05-07-17, 03:10 PM
"In the end, is it a better lived life to amass a bunch of money and live for yourself, or be homeless and volunteer and help others? I think the world has been blinded by money and the way life is set up. "

Let me tell you, this changes for most of the people as they grow up. Normally in the age of about 25-35 years old. If you're younger than that you might not realize that yet.

Btw, if you're homeless you probably don't have the energy to help others. And you have to focus on not starving to death yourself and finding a warmer place to stay. So realistically speaking, helping others is probably quite low on your list of priorities.

Could you explain what u you mean by this changes as you grow up? Do you mean you become more bitter? I only used the homeless example to demonstrate a point. If there's a point to this life, which as I've studied, it seems there is, it seems like spending all your energy and focus on having enough money to live similar to everyone else, instead of focusing on what you believe in, means you might live well in this life, but if there's something more, you might have missed the entire reason for coming here to live this life. I'm just saying almost everyone lives with a selfish focus to accumulate things. I'm not surprised you're speaking as you are, bc everyone wants others to live as they are so they feel better about it. In the end, imo, you have to answer for not only your actions, but also your inactions.

EuropeanADHD
05-07-17, 03:45 PM
Could you explain what u you mean by this changes as you grow up? Do you mean you become more bitter? I only used the homeless example to demonstrate a point. If there's a point to this life, which as I've studied, it seems there is, it seems like spending all your energy and focus on having enough money to live similar to everyone else, instead of focusing on what you believe in, means you might live well in this life, but if there's something more, you might have missed the entire reason for coming here to live this life. I'm just saying almost everyone lives with a selfish focus to accumulate things. I'm not surprised you're speaking as you are, bc everyone wants others to live as they are so they feel better about it. In the end, imo, you have to answer for not only your actions, but also your inactions.

No, I mean more pragmatic and seeing more shades of grey than only black and white ("helping others" vs. "living for money").

In the course of your life you might discover for example that NGOs you used to hold in high esteem are wasting money they receive and/or mobbing their employees and/or offering their employees unacceptable work conditions.

Also, the thing that someone works for a for-profit organisation doesn't mean they do so for money or are bad people in contrast to those noble people selflessly "helping others" :)

And lastly, there's absolutely nothing wrong in wanting to live a normal life, have a place to stay, eat healthy food and have money to do so if this money is not gained in an immoral manner.

I actually think romanticising poverty (your example of a homeless person happy to help the others) is a bad thing. Because it is frequently used to justify social inequalities. Like: "They are poor but they are so happy! Their life is meaningful!" - implying: there's no necessity to help them. I'm not saying you're doing this, your post just inspired me to add this remark. I've actually lived in poverty in the past and no, it's not sexy.

This is my last post in this thread :)

dvdnvwls
05-07-17, 06:58 PM
Being poor or being homeless sounds good (or noble or interesting or revolutionary or independent or frugal or green or countercultural) - until you actually have to live that way. Being homeless you find out that you have nowhere safe to keep your food, nowhere you can get a good sleep, ... not even a reliable place to go to the bathroom.

Being poor is easy, if you're not poor.

Yes there are kind and noble poor people, but there are also greedy obnoxious poor people.

l_ruth_
05-07-17, 07:59 PM
I was diagnosed as not having ADD actually. but I don't think professionals really know what ADD PI even is. It's probably like a form of leanring diability or mild aspergers, which I dunno, I guess I have. I'm just very spacy and have terrible anxiety, which I dunno what you'd classify it as, but that's what I have. I've suffered a lot from it. People don't really like being around me, I think I make people feel uncomfortable bc I can't function at the social level that most can. And it's caused me to question life and investigate it, and bc of that, I feel live a unique perspective and I have a hard time sitting in front of a computer when I want to talk about and create content that opens people's eyes to what I think this life might be about.

I've been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and yes, I agree with you ADD PI is pretty much not understood. this what makes me wonder about looking for a diagnosis, as I have this idea of not being believed

aur462
05-14-17, 04:51 PM
I've been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and yes, I agree with you ADD PI is pretty much not understood. this what makes me wonder about looking for a diagnosis, as I have this idea of not being believed

I didn't get diagnosed until I was 43 - though I wish I were more confident I had ADHD-PI (most likely I do).

The first attempt at diagnosis I took a test where you are seated at a computer and respond every time a certain symbol, etc. appears on the screen. I'm sure I did quite well. This was the first attempt to diagnose me and it was negative. I later spoke to a psychiatrist about this and he said something like, "that's a better test for hyperactive adhd".

Behaviors, etc. are much more likely to illustrate the 2 other types of ADHD, thus diagnosis is usually easier, I would imagine.

Swordson
07-09-17, 05:48 AM
I have inattentive ADHD and was diagnosed only a few years back. Before that my professional life felt much like what you are describing, and in some respects it still does. I have also felt the temptation to go for a simpler job, one that would demand less of me, thinking perhaps that would make me less stressed, more happy, but I doubt whether that would change anything. I have felt the same anxieties and pressures no matter what I have done - and I have done a lot of different things.

I think it is possible to find jobs that plays on the strengths of ADHD, but there will always be some compromises, and you have to be able to adapt. As an example, what I have found as my niche today is in PR and communications. Like many others with ADHD, I love new things, dealing with the hot button issues of the day, being in the middle of the action, innovating, dealing with people, debating, explaining. What I don't enjoy, and I'm frankly not good at, is managing, planning, paperwork, bureaucracy, but for a long time, I got enough stimulus from the job that I could deal with the limited amount of tedium that everything else represented.

But then, after some years, I got so good at PR and communications that a larger company offered me a job as Vice President of just that. Never being able to say no to a challenge, I accepted. Problem is, as VP I'm not as "hands on" as in my previous job, so I don't get the constant daily stimuli that I got before. Also, my new employer has until now had a more cautious and careful approach to PR and communications, which means that there is not as much controversy and debate to engage in. Fortunately, part of the reason they hired me was to help change this, but to do so, I have to run a long term process where I develop a strategy, build support, and execute it. I can't fire from the hip, get an idea in the morning and implement it that day. That is really frustrating, as I feel like it puts all my weaknesses on display, and I feel constantly understimulated, but I know I have to work through it if I am going to get what I want.

Moral of the story - yes, I believe there are jobs and careers that fit better for people with ADHD, but finding the right job will not solve your problems. The issues of ADHD will follow you everywhere. Look for a place where you can use your strengths and passions, because that will give you the motivation to endure the inevitable frustrations.

finallyfound10
07-09-17, 03:00 PM
I have inattentive ADHD and was diagnosed only a few years back. Before that my professional life felt much like what you are describing, and in some respects it still does. I have also felt the temptation to go for a simpler job, one that would demand less of me, thinking perhaps that would make me less stressed, more happy, but I doubt whether that would change anything. I have felt the same anxieties and pressures no matter what I have done - and I have done a lot of different things.

I think it is possible to find jobs that plays on the strengths of ADHD, but there will always be some compromises, and you have to be able to adapt. As an example, what I have found as my niche today is in PR and communications. Like many others with ADHD, I love new things, dealing with the hot button issues of the day, being in the middle of the action, innovating, dealing with people, debating, explaining. What I don't enjoy, and I'm frankly not good at, is managing, planning, paperwork, bureaucracy, but for a long time, I got enough stimulus from the job that I could deal with the limited amount of tedium that everything else represented.

But then, after some years, I got so good at PR and communications that a larger company offered me a job as Vice President of just that. Never being able to say no to a challenge, I accepted. Problem is, as VP I'm not as "hands on" as in my previous job, so I don't get the constant daily stimuli that I got before. Also, my new employer has until now had a more cautious and careful approach to PR and communications, which means that there is not as much controversy and debate to engage in. Fortunately, part of the reason they hired me was to help change this, but to do so, I have to run a long term process where I develop a strategy, build support, and execute it. I can't fire from the hip, get an idea in the morning and implement it that day. That is really frustrating, as I feel like it puts all my weaknesses on display, and I feel constantly understimulated, but I know I have to work through it if I am going to get what I want.

Moral of the story - yes, I believe there are jobs and careers that fit better for people with ADHD, but finding the right job will not solve your problems. The issues of ADHD will follow you everywhere. Look for a place where you can use your strengths and passions, because that will give you the motivation to endure the inevitable frustrations.

As VP, can you hire or assign people to those roles to carry out your idea?
I get the not as stimulated part as being frustrating. My new job is far less stimulating which I thought would solve part of the problem but it hasn't.

Your post is enlightening for me as I have thought that lower-level, very task-based jobs displayed my weaknesses and thought that higher-level more big picture, vision-casting type of jobs would be a better fit and hide my weaknesses but perhaps not. Especially if I have to do the entire process myself.

My advice: hire or delegate if you can. If you can't, maybe find a job where you can put your strengths on display.

GOOD LUCK!!!

Swordson
07-16-17, 09:09 AM
Thanks! Another typical feature of my life is that I keep forgetting to check in here often enough!

I guess your reply there confirms my point - the curse of ADHD is that it makes you feel like your weaknesses are on display no matter what you do. To me that goes to show that it is not the job you have that is the issue, but how you choose to deal with the consequences of ADHD irrespective of where you are. I had a bit of a crisis last night, as I am going on a transatlantic trip tomorrow to host my first two-day workshop with colleagues from a separate part of the company. Only days before leaving, I had not sent out the promised advance materials, schedule and tasks for the various participants. Fortunately I have a very understanding partner who allowed me to vent my frustration, and then promised to help me today if I needed to get stuff out. In the end she didn't have to, as I got up at 8:30 on a Sunday morning (after laying awake since 6:30, head working already) made coffee and breakfast, took a solid dose of my meds, and then isolated myself in our home office for three hours with "Two Steps from Hell" on my headphones to churn it out. Stress level much lower now, but it still frustrates me a bit that it had to come to this before I got down to doing what I always knew I had to do.

oldtimer
07-18-17, 09:38 AM
My advice to all of you is try to get an accurate diagnosis. That is the best way to find meds that can reduce your problems. Nate you may have what Amen calls anxious ADD. A standard treatment is a mild anti-anxiety drug that will not interfere with a stimulant. Busbar is one such drug for instance. What you don't want is something like Prozac which is great for anxiety but will make you much more ADD. That will make you more disorganized, more likely to procrastinate, careless, lose things etc.

No job is especially good for ADD persons. I suggest you find one that suits your other talents. ADD and especially inattentive ADD is not a crippling disability. We are usually not even diagnosed. Most of us self medicate by drinking lots of coffee that helps us.

Nate you do know this is an inattentive ADD forum not an anxious ADD forum? I bet half these people are in the wrong place but what can you expect from persons with ADD. No offence meant. Most of us are very careless.

Lunacie
07-18-17, 05:28 PM
My advice to all of you is try to get an accurate diagnosis. That is the best way to find meds that can reduce your problems. Nate you may have what Amen calls anxious ADD. A standard treatment is a mild anti-anxiety drug that will not interfere with a stimulant. Busbar is one such drug for instance. What you don't want is something like Prozac which is great for anxiety but will make you much more ADD. That will make you more disorganized, more likely to procrastinate, careless, lose things etc.

No job is especially good for ADD persons. I suggest you find one that suits your other talents. ADD and especially inattentive ADD is not a crippling disability. We are usually not even diagnosed. Most of us self medicate by drinking lots of coffee that helps us.

Nate you do know this is an inattentive ADD forum not an anxious ADD forum? I bet half these people are in the wrong place but what can you expect from persons with ADD. No offence meant. Most of us are very careless.

Actually, it's been five years since the OP last posted here. Chances are he
won't ever see your advice. ;)

This forum is for all sub-types of ADHD (hyperactive, inattentive and combined).

Anxiety is very common alongside ADHD, and the topic does come up from
time to time. There is even a sub-forum just for Anxiety that co-exists with
ADHD.

Do you have to include a recommendation for Amen Clinics in every post?
He is not an expert. There is no proper research to back his opinions, tests
or methods of treatment. And his clinic is ridiculously over-priced.

sarahsweets
07-19-17, 04:33 AM
My advice to all of you is try to get an accurate diagnosis. That is the best way to find meds that can reduce your problems. Nate you may have what Amen calls anxious ADD. A standard treatment is a mild anti-anxiety drug that will not interfere with a stimulant.
There are no more subtypes of adhd used, its all ADHD. I am not sure if Amen's subtypes are even recognized by the experts in ADHD.

Busbar is one such drug for instance. What you don't want is something like Prozac which is great for anxiety but will make you much more ADD. That will make you more disorganized, more likely to procrastinate, careless, lose things etc.

There are many antidepressants that are good for anxiety that are not prozac. Its not the only one out there.

No job is especially good for ADD persons. I suggest you find one that suits your other talents. ADD and especially inattentive ADD is not a crippling disability. We are usually not even diagnosed. Most of us self medicate by drinking lots of coffee that helps us.

Who are you to say that someone's impairments are not crippling?

Nate you do know this is an inattentive ADD forum not an anxious ADD forum? I bet half these people are in the wrong place but what can you expect from persons with ADD. No offence meant. Most of us are very careless.
There are no "anxious adhd" subforums because Amen's pet subtypes are not recognized by the experts.