View Full Version : Heredity question


FlipperTheWhale
05-08-17, 02:20 PM
Not sure if this has been discussed much or if it's even valid. Let me know if not.

Anyone that has been genetically tested have this come up in their DNA?
It is my strongest bad genetic trait.

rs1800497(T;T)
A1/A1: Bad at avoidance of errors. 0.25x lower OCD; 0.56x lower Tardive Diskinesia; higher ADHD

Apparently it has something to do with less dopamine receptors. Not looking for medical advice, just curious if anyone is similar and what it means to them?

sarahsweets
05-18-17, 01:53 AM
I know there's some promising evidence that genetic testing can help predict certain mental health issues or what medications work with someone but I dont think there is anything widely accepted yet. I cant remember where I read it but I thought there was a study done on parents passing on adhd to their kids and in particular, the likelihood of a father passing it to his children was greater than if the mother had adhd.

mildadhd
05-19-17, 11:32 AM
Hi FlipperTheWhale

There are people who have genetic predisposition associated with ADHD, but do not have ADHD.

There are people diagnosed with ADHD who do not test positive for any known genetic predisposition.

Do you have ADHD?

If you do not have symptoms of ADHD from early childhood, you will not get ADHD now.








m

Lunacie
05-19-17, 11:45 AM
Not sure if this has been discussed much or if it's even valid. Let me know if not.

Anyone that has been genetically tested have this come up in their DNA?
It is my strongest bad genetic trait.

rs1800497(T;T)
A1/A1: Bad at avoidance of errors. 0.25x lower OCD; 0.56x lower Tardive Diskinesia; higher ADHD

Apparently it has something to do with less dopamine receptors. Not looking for medical advice, just curious if anyone is similar and what it means to them?

Interesting. Was this testing very expensive?

I'd be interested if I could get this done on myself, my daughter, and my two
grandchildren. To compare the results. We have a handful of diagnoses that
are shared among us: adhd, autism, anxiety, depression, migraine, and
fibromyalgia.

mildadhd
05-19-17, 12:05 PM
FlipperTheWhale

All research on ADHD I have ever seen, writes about both environmental factors and genetic factors.

Not just genetic factors.

Which is extremely important from early prevention, lessening of severity and treatment perspectives.




m

mildadhd
05-19-17, 01:35 PM
Raw, uninterpreted genetic data file** (Must not be used for medical or diagnostic purposes).

Considerations:
Keep in mind that having one of these variants does not necessarily mean you will develop the condition.
These reports do not cover all possible genetic variants that could influence risk for these conditions.
Other non-genetic factors can also influence risk for these conditions...

-23 and Me website


m

FlipperTheWhale
05-19-17, 11:09 PM
Thanks for the feedback!

I was just curious if others had similar results. I had many issues growing up and into adulthood, but have never been formally checked for ADHD. But reading up on it, I suspect I may have some form of it. Just an informal research on my part.

fperkins33
05-23-17, 01:40 PM
Hi FlipperTheWhale

There are people who have genetic predisposition associated with ADHD, but do not have ADHD.

There are people diagnosed with ADHD who do not test positive for any known genetic predisposition.

Do you have ADHD?

If you do not have symptoms of ADHD from early childhood, you will not get ADHD now.

m

Whether one has symptoms of ADHD from early childhood is unfortunately very different from whether one has had recognized, or even suspected, symptoms of ADHD in childhood.

Getting a diagnosis in adulthood of an executive function disorder based on childhood presentation of symptoms is sometimes like using uncut lumber to build the saw.

Reliable/informative genetic testing for psychiatric disorders is a long ways off, whether for preventive, predictive or treatment purposes. Sadly, the DEA has a lot more say about current treatments than the FDA...

mildadhd
05-23-17, 05:48 PM
Whether one has symptoms of ADHD from early childhood is unfortunately very different from whether one has had recognized, or even suspected, symptoms of ADHD in childhood.





Yes, my mistake, I should have wrote children must have had symptoms after approx the ages of 4-7

Hyperactivity, impulsivity and inattention are normal in early human childhood, before approx the ages of 4-7.

I was addressing FlipperTheWhale, who is not a young child, and that if an adult did not have symptoms as a young child, then a person would not get ADHD, as an adult.

People who have ADHD (neurodevelopmental condition) do not develop self regulation skills then lose them.

The guidelines have changed to accommodate people who do not remember early childhood, and have no way to confirm.

But biologically all people who have deficits of self regulation, do to the ADHD neurodevelopmental condition never developed the self regulation they lack in the first place.

It is extremely important not forget, even if they change the guidelines to accommodate people who do not have memories or ways to confirm lack of development.

So we can understand the origins of the condition in general, for future research, prevention and lessening of severity purposes, etc.

Even if the person cannot remember these developmental facts, these facts are still true for everyone who really has ADHD, and not Traumatic brain injury or other condition that mimics ADHD.

There is no brain damage in ADHD, there is a lack of development.


m

mildadhd
05-23-17, 06:23 PM
What I cannot figure out, is how a child could be prescribed medication before the age of 7, if there is no way to confirm if the child is just late to develop or really has ADHD, especially if the child presents mild to moderate symptoms.


M

FlipperTheWhale
05-31-17, 08:09 AM
The fact is my childhood was quite chaotic. Alcoholic father and older brothers left little time for my evaluation of needs. I am not even sure anyone knew about ADHD in my circle of life. My mom told me the school said I had tested very high in a subject and should attend a special school, but they didn't have the resources for that. So I never was never able to realize what ever that was. I started having panic attacks in my late teens and had no idea what they were. Kept it to myself for many years and mostly avoided a lot of things.

So being diagnosed in youth is not an option for everyone. What I remember about myself. I was the clever class clown, but the kind most teachers like. I could only express my self with humor. I could barely read out loud. Never did home work. In fact could barely speak in public. Book reports were a nightmare. I passed by listening in class. Extremely shy.
Fun loving. Small group of friends.

sarahsweets
05-31-17, 08:24 AM
What I cannot figure out, is how a child could be prescribed medication before the age of 7, if there is no way to confirm if the child is just late to develop or really has ADHD, especially if the child presents mild to moderate symptoms.


M

Couldnt the same be said for an adult? Since there are no definitive tests for adhd and a lot of it is diagnosed based on case history and opinion, prescribing to an adult also be like a crap shoot? If you want to know my son's story without me hashing it here, its a sticky in children's diagnosis. Maybe I am misunderstanding you though. Medication saved his life.

mildadhd
05-31-17, 09:27 AM
Couldnt the same be said for an adult? Since there are no definitive tests for adhd and a lot of it is diagnosed based on case history and opinion, prescribing to an adult also be like a crap shoot? If you want to know my son's story without me hashing it here, its a sticky in children's diagnosis. Maybe I am misunderstanding you though. Medication saved his life.

What I mean is..

Hyperactivity, inattention and lack of impulse control, are normal up to the age of 4-7.

For some children these traits are normal to the age 4, but it is also normal for other children who are slower to develop to have these traits up to the age of 7.

So unless the children have severe symptoms how do they know if the child has ADHD or is just a slow learner, until age 7?


M