View Full Version : Do I have ADD or am I just lazy?


HaloEvent
05-08-17, 09:01 PM
Hi, my name is Rick. I am 19 years old.. Sorry if this is the wrong thread, I quickly glanced over the page and this seemed like the right place. Anyways, sorry my thoughts seem jumbled and such. Overall, my parents and family have always excused my tendencies as me simply being lazy or unmotivated. My family comes from the ideology that either youíre hard working or youíre simply lazy or stupid. My family always makes the point that Iím a smart person and that Iím just not applying myself to my full potential.

So, for a long while now Iíve had large procrastination problems, itís been really noticeable for the past couple of years. No matter how much I know I have to do something, I can never seem to make myself do it, thereís always the ďIíll do it laterĒ the ďnext timeĒ or ďit's not that importantĒ excuse. Whenever I have something due for college, I always leave it to the last minute to do it.

When it comes to talking, especially with strangers or people I barely know, I always seem to talk to much, always telling stories or something and not always listening to other people.

I often notice that I have something in my hand, whether Iím fidgeting with a pen, a lighter (not actually lighting it), a deck of cards, etc.. or Iím simply bouncing my knee or running my hand thru my awfully short hair. My hands pretty much always have something in them and it feels a bit off when Iím not holding something.

I find it hard to actually sit down and do a task, non stop, with little to no distractions as possible. The longer the task, the more Iíll procrastinate and do something else (play video games, go on the internet and browse reddit, etc.).

When it comes to conversations with my family, I tend to want to speed things up and have the conversation be over with, especially when I donít like the topic, or Iíll just zone out or something. Yesterday I was talking to my grandfather in our family's backyard where he was sharpening a few knives. When I was talking to him, I was preoccupied with looking at the knife or messing with the soccer ball or something and not really diverting all my attention to him. Iím easily bored with things and I tend to switch topics often. Iím often excited and want to do something, but I often never go all the way thru with it and usually I leave it half done or I come back to it in a day or two.

Overall, Iím easily distracted and I often make reckless mistakes and I am easily forgetful. When it comes to things such as tests I will think that Iíve done everything only to realize I made a few small mistakes (in math, that I divided by 2.3 instead of 2.4, etc..) which lead me to get the wrong answer or Iíll skip steps or forget to do them entirely.

During certain conversations, I rush to say things and I end up losing my train of thought. I often misplace things such as my sunglasses (Iíve lost three pairs of Oakley's in two years), but I always know where my keys are (~90% of the time). Other things appear where I donít remember putting them, or I often completely forget to put things back where I got them or where they should go (putting the dishes in the sink, putting the jar of jelly back in the fridge).

I have noticed that I am easily forgetful when doing various things. My grandparents would ask me to send them an email or call them back and Iíll make a note of it then completely forget about it altogether (this happens about ~75-80% of the time). Even with household things I could easily forget to take out the trash or do the dishes unless Iíve been reminded a few times or Iím forced to do it right away. It does happen where I would do it right away, but not often, or Iíll remember to do it after it's been about two or so hours.

I tend to like doing things that allow me to wander off mentally, so I can make up various fantasies. I have about three various mental stories that I keep repeating or modifying that are completely unrealistic. An example would be where I am for some reason the only human left and I can live indefinitely (I recently realized that this fantasy is partially based on the BBC show Doctor Who), where I end up creating various amazing things such as spaceships, etc.. Itís completely unrealistic but I enjoy it quite a bit.

I can describe myself as slightly immature. I have trouble articulating my ideas, I know what I want to say but I can't say it. Iím not as quick to make logical assumptions or jump to conclusions, but once someone else has made them I think to myself ďwell, duh, whyíd you not think of it before?Ē. I tend to like doing things such as partying and I find myself always having energy when everyone else seems tired. Iím usually the last one in my family to fall asleep (around 2am).

School wise, Iím struggling with grades even though the topics at hand are easy enough to manage if I just simply sit down and do them.

I feel like I am forgetting to add something, but Iíll probably leave it in the comments once I remember it. With everything said, I do want to add one thing. In late September 2014 I got into a biking accident that left me with a concussion and I had to have a psych consult a few months later to make sure I was recovering fine (this was Feb 2015 (Itís the beginning of May 2017 right now)). The psych (I think it was psych) consult showed that Iím fine and I have no actual problems. So, does it seem that I have ADD or is it that I just have various issues that make it seem to me that I have ADD even though I donít?

l_ruth_
05-09-17, 12:59 AM
you're definitely not just lazy, I don't think that is a helpful idea from your fam

Johnny Slick
05-09-17, 01:28 AM
Do you think people can just be lazy? If so that in and of itself is something you should address. If not, why do you think you're the exception?

Nobody here can classify you as ADHD or anything else. You have issues that you should talk with a therapist about. Maybe it'll turn out to be ADHD, maybe it'll turn out to be something completely different. Who knows? Whatever it is, though, it's probably not going to be a character flaw.

LikeAFox
05-09-17, 08:07 AM
I'm just beginning to sort through these things myself, so I have no claim to seasoned advice. What I can say is that the foundation of a "disorder" is that it is pervasive, unwanted, and interferes with daily living. For instance, there are a lot of people who claim to be "OCD," but in reality they just like things to be in order. They don't actually suffer from pervasive and intrusive compulsions. I would think the same goes for ADHD in that someone could simply not care about certain things and therefore pay them little attention or make little effort, whereas I would guess an ADHD person can't hold the thought in their mind even if they genuinely cared to. I find myself in the latter category.

Even now, there were two quick points I wanted to make with this post and I have no idea what the second was now. Aaaaaaaand now I'm frustrated. Bleck.

HaloEvent
05-09-17, 03:00 PM
Do you think people can just be lazy? If so that in and of itself is something you should address. If not, why do you think you're the exception?

Nobody here can classify you as ADHD or anything else. You have issues that you should talk with a therapist about. Maybe it'll turn out to be ADHD, maybe it'll turn out to be something completely different. Who knows? Whatever it is, though, it's probably not going to be a character flaw.

Thing is, I've been to a therapist or a psychiatrist or whatever two years ago after my concussion as recommended by my neurologist. Because of that I don't think my health insurance would cover the visit. Crap, I forgot what I was gonna add.

Johnny Slick
05-09-17, 04:12 PM
I would definitely look into what your health insurance does and doesn't cover. Some have surprisingly decent coverage for therapy, and even the ones that are like "12 sessions and then you pay for the rest" could be enough to get your started. Failing that, do you have a university nearby, maybe? I know that while I went to mine, I was able to take advantage of low-cost, sliding scale psychiatrists... well, I think these folks were mainly students, but I do feel like the #1 thing you need at this point is a. the "talking cure" (by which I mean, I think you need to speak to a disinterested third party and have them tell you that no, you're not lazy) and b. some kind of provisional, possible diagnosis to go forward with.

HaloEvent
05-09-17, 07:28 PM
I would definitely look into what your health insurance does and doesn't cover. Some have surprisingly decent coverage for therapy, and even the ones that are like "12 sessions and then you pay for the rest" could be enough to get your started. Failing that, do you have a university nearby, maybe? I know that while I went to mine, I was able to take advantage of low-cost, sliding scale psychiatrists... well, I think these folks were mainly students, but I do feel like the #1 thing you need at this point is a. the "talking cure" (by which I mean, I think you need to speak to a disinterested third party and have them tell you that no, you're not lazy) and b. some kind of provisional, possible diagnosis to go forward with.
I currently go to a Community College. We have student health services building that I go to for help with quitting smoking (something that I've been poorly accomplishing by saying to myself "ill just put in more effort later"). I've been meaning to check in with them but I haven't been able to do because I either don't have time or I forget.

HaloEvent
05-09-17, 07:32 PM
A couple of more things I want to add that I forgot:
My room (mainly my desk) looks like a tornado went thru it. I never manage to clean it up, besides putting dirty clothes in the laundry out of pure habit, even if I make note to do so (I'll start but fail to finish).
When it comes to projects I usually put in low to minimum effort into them and rush them. When it comes to doing things, I loose interest/motivation quickly even though I was pumped to do them and I spend more time thinking about them rather than doing them.

HaloEvent
05-09-17, 07:35 PM
you're definitely not just lazy, I don't think that is a helpful idea from your fam
My parents come from the Soviet Union where they really didn't see mental issues as problematic as they are. You're depressed? That's because you're not working hard enough, go work and focus on happier things. You're suicidal? That's because you're not working hard enough and hence you're a failure and are suicidal because of that, go work harder. Etc..

Kunga Dorji
05-10-17, 01:29 AM
A couple of more things I want to add that I forgot:
My room (mainly my desk) looks like a tornado went thru it. I never manage to clean it up, besides putting dirty clothes in the laundry out of pure habit, even if I make note to do so (I'll start but fail to finish).
When it comes to projects I usually put in low to minimum effort into them and rush them. When it comes to doing things, I loose interest/motivation quickly even though I was pumped to do them and I spend more time thinking about them rather than doing them.


What you are describing in all your posts could well fit ADHD, assuming there are no other causes- say such as depression.

The first step is to get a proper assessment done- and that requires one that not only looks at ADHD symptoms but rules out other causes.

Have you looked at any books about it or tried any symptoms scores? They give some indication.

The other thing is many ADHD types are uncoordinated and have minor eye tracking issues when reading, but as these symptoms are not included in the official description, they are often not attended to.

HaloEvent
05-10-17, 11:34 AM
What you are describing in all your posts could well fit ADHD, assuming there are no other causes- say such as depression.

The first step is to get a proper assessment done- and that requires one that not only looks at ADHD symptoms but rules out other causes.

Have you looked at any books about it or tried any symptoms scores? They give some indication.

The other thing is many ADHD types are uncoordinated and have minor eye tracking issues when reading, but as these symptoms are not included in the official description, they are often not attended to.
I have done a few tests. One of them is the WHO test, forget the actual name, and 9/10 of those tests indicate that I have moderate to severe AD(H)D. But like I said, my parents come from a Soviet mentality that doesn't really​ believe in mental disorders as self standing things that just occure and are always results of something: Lack of effort in work, etc.. so they don't really want me to get tested because they don't really see it as it's own independent issue and rather they think I'm just making it up and using it as an excuse.

HaloEvent
05-10-17, 11:38 AM
What you are describing in all your posts could well fit ADHD, assuming there are no other causes- say such as depression.

The first step is to get a proper assessment done- and that requires one that not only looks at ADHD symptoms but rules out other causes.

Have you looked at any books about it or tried any symptoms scores? They give some indication.

The other thing is many ADHD types are uncoordinated and have minor eye tracking issues when reading, but as these symptoms are not included in the official description, they are often not attended to.
One more thing. I'm depressed, but not because of some random thing, it's because I can't accomplish work, and even then those depression episodes are short lasting and I can reason them out, effectively make them go away by saying to myself "well, you still have some time to finish the work, you just have to concentrate" even though those things are just likes I tell myself because I never really go thru on them, not because I don't want to but because I can't force myself too. Literally the only way I can legitimately accomplish work is if I have someone standing over me with a baseball bat (metaphorically speaking here).

aur462
05-10-17, 06:39 PM
Do you remember similar behaviors you outlined happening before you were a teenager, especially prior to 5 or 6?

I'm no doctor, and far from an expert on ADHD, but IMO it sounds like you have ADHD and comorbid (plus) depression, especially since your head injury is ostensibly not a factor. People with ADD often have depression, especially if it's untreated. Additionally, your indication of scoring 9/10 on an ADHD self-test is tangentially, to me, more evidence you might have ADHD.

Self-will, as your parents have encouraged, is a road to nowhere and an old-fashioned but common attitude about mental maladies.

HaloEvent
05-10-17, 08:28 PM
Do you remember similar behaviors you outlined happening before you were a teenager, especially prior to 5 or 6?

I'm no doctor, and far from an expert on ADHD, but IMO it sounds like you have ADHD and comorbid (plus) depression, especially since your head injury is ostensibly not a factor. People with ADD often have depression, especially if it's untreated. Additionally, your indication of scoring 9/10 on an ADHD self-test is tangentially, to me, more evidence you might have ADHD.

Self-will, as your parents have encouraged, is a road to nowhere and an old-fashioned but common attitude about mental maladies.
Let me clarify. Out of the 10 or so tests I've taken, I've scored what might be considered moderate to severe ADHD on about 8-9 of them. I often start suffering from anxiety or depression when I fail to complete work I know I'm supposed to do or when I know a deadline is approaching for a big project and I haven't completed it.

When I had my head injury, the Psychiatrist cleared me as not having any mental issues or disorders. Thing is, if I do go and get tested again, the doctor will have to ask my parents and family about me to make sure I'm not making up my symptoms, I'm not worried about that, it's just my parents don't know my entire story (I've tried talking to them before about this, but they dismissed it and said "you already had a psych consult after your concussion, you're fine, you're just making excuses for yourself") and might offer a different story that is biased as they don't know everything, especially since they always approach from the "lack of effort or will" alley, it's not that I don't want to succeed its just that I can never apply myself enough and part of me has already given up because I keep getting bad results no matter what I do.

More details that I forgot about: When I was in High School (sophomore year, a year before my head injury), I ditched a lot of swim practices, mainly because I couldn't apply myself and I didn't enjoy them, my parents caught me and I ended up quitting swimming after my injury. I'm in college and I have skipped a lot of classes, mainly my Calc class as I struggle with the class and it takes me a prolonged time to understand the material, something I don't have the patience for, especially considering I can't tolerate constantly doing math for two or so hours pretty much non stop. It's not that I can't keep still when doing it, it's just that I start getting frustrated, bored, and I tend to miss details, even if I don't mean too, especially since I tend to rush the work, I also tend to jump around or skim the text of my textbooks and I rarely read them in full detail. I'm a really "hands on" type of person, I more enjoy doing things with my hands, lab experiments, building stuff, etc.. rather than sitting in lecture all for an hour and a half. I'm not even paying attention in lecture half the time, partially because the material isn't super interesting (mainly in math) and partially because I tend to wander off easily (more or less).

With all that said, please take all the things I've said with a grain of salt as I can't properly gauge what is considered "normal" and what is not. A lot of these symptoms can be traced back to my early childhood (learning to ride a bike, learning rollerskating, etc..) where I would get bored with the activities quickly and give up on them.

I think that is it... For now. If I remember more stuff, I'll add it. Thanks for the help!

aur462
05-10-17, 11:21 PM
ADD/anxiety always hijacked my attention in math. Combined with no particular talent in it, I struggled.

Do your best to see a helpful healthcare provider. You're 19 and seem to keenly observe your shortcomings. I know you may not have a lot of autonomy in your current situation/age, but if at all possible, see someone (research them too if possible) about your symptoms.

HaloEvent
05-11-17, 11:11 PM
ADD/anxiety always hijacked my attention in math. Combined with no particular talent in it, I struggled.

Do your best to see a helpful healthcare provider. You're 19 and seem to keenly observe your shortcomings. I know you may not have a lot of autonomy in your current situation/age, but if at all possible, see someone (research them too if possible) about your symptoms.

I'll do my best. My parents are adamantly against it (they still have a pretty big influence in my life, due to culture and me still living with them). But I'll find some way.

Johnny Slick
05-12-17, 12:41 AM
One thing to bear in mind with them too is that if you have it, it's very likely that at least one of them also has it, and, well, nobody gives ADHD people a harder time than people who are undiagnosed ADHD themselves.

l_ruth_
05-12-17, 12:49 AM
Hey, I'm diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder and also think I have ADHD (Primarily Inattentive).

I found these reflections quite helpful

Brown, ADHD and the Emotional Brain, 39-41 http://brownadhdclinic.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/Brown_Smart-But-Stuck-Sample-1.pdf

chronic stress and the burden of the ďwillpower assumptionĒ

One recurrent factor that complicated the emotions of these very bright individuals was the ongoing discrepancy between what was expected of them by their parents, grandparents, and teachers and even themselves and their frequent failure to achieve the expected success. Most of these patients had struggled since early childhood with continuing conflict between their picture of themselves as exceptionally bright and talented and their view of themselves as disappointing failures, unable toďdeliver the goodsĒ expected of them. Some had been very successful in their childhood,earninghighgradesandstrongpraiseduringth eelementary school years, then gradually lost status and self-esteem due to increasing evidence of their difficulty in coping with the escalating demands of middle school, high school, and post secondary schooling.

Everyone of the patients whose story appears in this book suffered from being confronted repeatedly with the stark contrast between their impressive abilities, effort, and achievement in a few specific activities where they felt strong personal interest and their very inconsistent effort and weak achievement in many other activities that were clearly important for their longer-term future. Typically their parents, teachers, and others who recognized their strong potential and wanted to help them fulfill it would urge, cajole, and pressure them to exercise ďwillpowerĒ to show the same strength, effort, and success in those other domains that could significantly improve their future options in life. Most often, those with ADHD joined in criticizing themselves for continuing failure to ďjust make myself do it.Ē Both the well-intentioned critics and the guilt-ridden criticized shared the erroneous assumption that symptoms of ADHD could be overcome with sufficient determination and continuing exercise of presumably availablewillpower.

Except for genetic influences, the family does not cause a person to develop ADHD. However, family members can severely exacerbate the difficulties of someone with ADHD if they do not adequately understand the true nature of the disorder and if they tend to punish that individual with harsh and repeated criticism based on the erroneous assumption that ADHD impairments can be overcome simply by willpower. Such criticism is readily internalized, and the resulting shame, resentment, frustration, and self-loathing tend to echo endlessly in the memory of the person with ADHD. Even if they recognize this, those who live or work with a person who has significant ADHD impairments often feel extremely frustrated as they repeatedly encounter chronic lateness, poor planning, excessive forgetfulness, frequent lying, and recurrent disappointment from unfulfilled promises. Itís not easy for them to hold back their criticism.

Itís very difficult for most people to understand how any individual can be very focused on certain tasks or can mobilize themselves to complete a task effectively under the last-minute pressure of an imminent deadline and yet be unable to force themselves to deploy these same abilities in an appropriate and timely way, especially for tasks that are obviously important. Most do not understand that when a person is faced with a task in which he has strong and immediate personal interest, either because he really enjoys it or because he fears that not doing the task will quickly bring some very unpleasant consequence, the chemistry of the brain is instantly altered to mobilize. And most donít know that this alteration of brain chemistry is not under voluntary control. ADHD clearly appears to be a problem of willpower failure, but it is actually a problem with the interacting dynamics of emotion, working memory, and the chemistry of the brain.

blaming the victim
Failure to understand this basic fact about ADHD ó that it appears to be a lack of willpower, when it is not ó commonly leads to a blaming of the victim. This manifests both in self-blaming by those with ADHD and in the many subtle or not-so-subtle reactions of family members, teachers, friends, or employers.

HaloEvent
05-12-17, 01:20 AM
Hey, I'm diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder and also think I have ADHD (Primarily Inattentive).

I found these reflections quite helpful

Brown, ADHD and the Emotional Brain, 39-41 http://brownadhdclinic.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/Brown_Smart-But-Stuck-Sample-1.pdf

This quote does sound a lot like me. In my early childhood (up until 4th grade) I was really successful, in preschool I could memorize poems and such flawlessly and up until 4th grade I was doing well in school (grade wise). When it comes to work under pressure of an imminent deadline, I feel I'm not *** successful, but I am able to sit down and power thru the work, even if it's done poorly, making me feel as if I'm doing it voluntarily (am I?). Over the last few days I've been flipping back and forth between the idea that I may have ADD and the idea that it's just an excuse I'm making up for myself to explain why I'm doing so poorly in school and such. Honestly, I feel like a diagnosis of ADD may be a blessing to me as it would actually explain a lot of the issues I'm facing in school and at home, even though the idea of being forced to take meds and go to therapy kind of threatens me (am I going to be different? What effects will the medication have? What if I'm misdiagnosed?).

HaloEvent
05-12-17, 05:02 PM
One thing to bear in mind with them too is that if you have it, it's very likely that at least one of them also has it, and, well, nobody gives ADHD people a harder time than people who are undiagnosed ADHD themselves.
This all ties back to what I said about the Soviet mentality. Few people in the former Soviet Union viewed mental issues as causes and instead viewed them as consequences of something. Maybe (key word here) my mom may have had it when she was younger, because I remember my grandparents (her parents) telling me often times that they always had to pressure her to do well in school (before she went off to university at age ~16-17 (that was the age most people went to university as the soviet education system had 10 (or 11) grades instead of 12 as here)) , they were pretty much (metaphorically speaking here) be standing over her head with a baseball bat and forcing her to do her work. Then it may be on my fathers side where there is a history of various problems (often being antisocial, (my fathers father is a great example), relatives having things such as kidney problems, eye problems (my biological father is partially blind in one eye (I think)), etc...) some of those problems may have been due to malnutrition, while others (mainly the antisocial factor (I tend to be antisocial here and there and have trouble making friends) being genetic.

l_ruth_
05-12-17, 06:51 PM
This quote does sound a lot like me. In my early childhood (up until 4th grade) I was really successful, in preschool I could memorize poems and such flawlessly and up until 4th grade I was doing well in school (grade wise). When it comes to work under pressure of an imminent deadline, I feel I'm not *** successful, but I am able to sit down and power thru the work, even if it's done poorly, making me feel as if I'm doing it voluntarily (am I?). Over the last few days I've been flipping back and forth between the idea that I may have ADD and the idea that it's just an excuse I'm making up for myself to explain why I'm doing so poorly in school and such. Honestly, I feel like a diagnosis of ADD may be a blessing to me as it would actually explain a lot of the issues I'm facing in school and at home, even though the idea of being forced to take meds and go to therapy kind of threatens me (am I going to be different? What effects will the medication have? What if I'm misdiagnosed?).
one of the consequences of having ADD I think is doing badly in timed exams/assessment situations - I'm pretty sure this impacts on possible scenarios in school and home. If the prospect of getting a diagnosis feels like a relief already, just the prospect, that says a lot of what the consequences of getting a diagnosis could mean - sounds like it could make a huge difference to how supported you are, provided the supports you can get are based on seeing what are actually issues for you. In general, I think there is nothing lost from seeking a diagnosis, especially not if it could really make a difference :)

HaloEvent
05-12-17, 09:19 PM
one of the consequences of having ADD I think is doing badly in timed exams/assessment situations - I'm pretty sure this impacts on possible scenarios in school and home. If the prospect of getting a diagnosis feels like a relief already, just the prospect, that says a lot of what the consequences of getting a diagnosis could mean - sounds like it could make a huge difference to how supported you are, provided the supports you can get are based on seeing what are actually issues for you. In general, I think there is nothing lost from seeking a diagnosis, especially not if it could really make a difference :)
When it comes to exams, I feel I just rush them, whether or not they are timed. I tend to miss (not always) some things, that when I look over the test after we get it back as "how did I miss this?". When I do finally force myself to study, I end up studying for about 30 mins after which I say to myself "It's ok, you got this, you know the material, the test is going to be easy" even though part of me knows that's not the case and then I just go back to doing whatever.

Overall, the main problems I have are those where I can't sit down and focus on school material for long periods of time, or in general and that I can't force myself to do school related work, even though I know it's important, unless it's last minute and the sheer panic and anxiety actually forces me to do it. All the other symptoms I have I feel may be related. Sometimes (key word) when it comes to leisure activities or when I have a lot of free time, I either can't unwind or I can't do something for a prolonged period of time as I get bored and I end up doing something mindlessly for some time before trying to find something interesting to do.

HaloEvent
05-13-17, 04:19 PM
When it comes to exams, I feel I just rush them, whether or not they are timed. I tend to miss (not always) some things, that when I look over the test after we get it back as "how did I miss this?". When I do finally force myself to study, I end up studying for about 30 mins after which I say to myself "It's ok, you got this, you know the material, the test is going to be easy" even though part of me knows that's not the case and then I just go back to doing whatever.

Overall, the main problems I have are those where I can't sit down and focus on school material for long periods of time, or in general and that I can't force myself to do school related work, even though I know it's important, unless it's last minute and the sheer panic and anxiety actually forces me to do it. All the other symptoms I have I feel may be related. Sometimes (key word) when it comes to leisure activities or when I have a lot of free time, I either can't unwind or I can't do something for a prolonged period of time as I get bored and I end up doing something mindlessly for some time before trying to find something interesting to do.
I also tend to like extreme stimulation when it comes to things like video games where slower paced things are often boring. There's a video game series called Halo, there is a multiplayer gamemode called "griffball" that is rather fast paced and I would easily get immersed in it as it tends to give me the feeling of "I'm unstoppable" and the such.

l_ruth_
05-14-17, 01:32 AM
I also tend to like extreme stimulation when it comes to things like video games where slower paced things are often boring. There's a video game series called Halo, there is a multiplayer gamemode called "griffball" that is rather fast paced and I would easily get immersed in it as it tends to give me the feeling of "I'm unstoppable" and the such.

I can relate with you on this. One of the things which may make it hard for me to achieve a research degree, which I am aiming towards. Not much stomach for the ordinary details and standard procedures, but the thrill and stimulation of chasing down a rabbit hole

jkimbo
05-14-17, 06:14 AM
Since there are always a lot more factors at play then we know, it can be hard to sort out whats going on or what is the cause, often it can be more then one cause.

I suggest that you forget about the labels and simply concentrate on the symptoms. Address the symptoms without worrying what label to put on them. There are so many variations for each disorder and they share a lot of elements, you could go crazy trying to sort that out. It becomes so much easier when you simply address the symptoms with worrying about assigning a label to them.

aur462
05-14-17, 04:07 PM
Since there are always a lot more factors at play then we know, it can be hard to sort out whats going on or what is the cause, often it can be more then one cause.

I suggest that you forget about the labels and simply concentrate on the symptoms. Address the symptoms without worrying what label to put on them. There are so many variations for each disorder and they share a lot of elements, you could go crazy trying to sort that out. It becomes so much easier when you simply address the symptoms with worrying about assigning a label to them.

I agree. Diagnosis of an official disorder can be hard, and sometimes it's not necessary. It's taken me until almost 45, but gradually I'm uncovering the relationships that ADHD has with other disorders and the ambiguity that goes along with that. Comorbidity - having more than one disorder - is more the rule than the exception. Having said that, I went over 15 years treating anxiety/depression without treating ADHD, and of all the psychiatrists I went too, none diagnosed ADHD until I asked to be diagnosed; bear that in mind - you should, in my opinion, ASK for them to rule it out. It would have been great to have gotten diagnosed at 19...or 40.

HaloEvent
05-14-17, 11:07 PM
Since there are always a lot more factors at play then we know, it can be hard to sort out whats going on or what is the cause, often it can be more then one cause.

I suggest that you forget about the labels and simply concentrate on the symptoms. Address the symptoms without worrying what label to put on them. There are so many variations for each disorder and they share a lot of elements, you could go crazy trying to sort that out. It becomes so much easier when you simply address the symptoms with worrying about assigning a label to them.
Thank you. The reason why I seem so hellbent on thinking its ADD (or ADHD, I don't the right category to put myself into as I fall into both) is that a lot of my symptoms match up with what I know about AD(H)D and what I researched about it. Add that to the various stories I read about people in situations like mine, I would say that if I did have a disorder, it might as well be AD(H)D. The serious concussion I suffered two and a half years ago definitely sped things up quite a bit (symptoms). I read that post concussion syndrome has similar symptoms but the thing is, I've had quite a lot of these symptoms before the concussion, maybe not as severe, but they where there.

sarahsweets
05-16-17, 03:43 AM
Cultural bias is a real pain when it comes to families and the adhd person in them. I am sorry that you are in a position where you feel like addressing these things will not be received well. I can only say that you are going to have to push through all those fears and unknowns and just force yourself to deal with it. You are going to have to find out on your own what is covered by insurance and what could possibly be covered by student insurance or services. Do you have any sort of mandatory insurance through the school? Alot of schools charge a fee and give you a very basic level of coverage. No matter, you are going to have to decide if its worth suffering the way things are now, or if you can take that leap and get the info you need to get treated. I am so behind treatment that I would way, even if you have to lie about what doc your need to see and what for, its worth it.

HaloEvent
05-16-17, 07:51 PM
Cultural bias is a real pain when it comes to families and the adhd person in them. I am sorry that you are in a position where you feel like addressing these things will not be received well. I can only say that you are going to have to push through all those fears and unknowns and just force yourself to deal with it. You are going to have to find out on your own what is covered by insurance and what could possibly be covered by student insurance or services. Do you have any sort of mandatory insurance through the school? Alot of schools charge a fee and give you a very basic level of coverage. No matter, you are going to have to decide if its worth suffering the way things are now, or if you can take that leap and get the info you need to get treated. I am so behind treatment that I would way, even if you have to lie about what doc your need to see and what for, its worth it.
Thanks. I have insurance thru my dads work. It's good insurance, I'll try to see if it is covered, I think it is.

DJ Bill
05-17-17, 06:47 PM
"I'm a really "hands on" type of person, I more enjoy doing things with my hands, lab experiments, building stuff, etc.. rather than sitting in lecture all for an hour and a half. I'm not even paying attention in lecture half the time, partially because the material isn't super interesting (mainly in math) and partially because I tend to wander off easily (more or less)."

That isn't a bad thing at all wanting to do stuff instead of hearing about stuff. Some of us learn by doing, others can learn well in a lecture. Google "learning styles" and you might find out some tips on how to handle schoolwork with your own learning style.

You are the only one that has to make your life what you want....and honestly, it sounds like you are doing that pretty well. Best of luck in your future.

Philbert
05-20-17, 09:55 AM
Hi Halo. I can totally relate to your personality and symptoms. I was very similar to you at your age, except for the excessive talking. I was the opposite. I was always the quiet one, which always bothered me, but I had a very hard time conversing with anyone.

I'm 46 now, and I just got diagnosed with ADHD, inattentive type, December 2016. I went to a licensed counselor, who tested me, and it clearly showed, that I was strongly in the inattentive ADHD category. He couldn't prescribe meds, so sent the info to my physician. I've been on meds and it helps. Don't think I have just the right dosage or type of med yet, but it's still early. My wife has been on ADHD meds for years, for that and also BED, and she's the one who recommended me going to get tested - we've only been married about 2 years.

If you haven't already, I would definitely go to a licensed counselor/psychologist or psychiatrist specifically for getting tested for ADHD. You mentioned you have seen doctors due to your bike accident, but I didn't notice whether the issue of ADHD specifically came up, so maybe that's why they didn't address it. I didn't read all posts, if they did, please forgive me.

I believe my college years and years in between now would have been much more successful and smoother if I had been diagnosed during those years.

HaloEvent
05-20-17, 05:24 PM
Hi Halo. I can totally relate to your personality and symptoms. I was very similar to you at your age, except for the excessive talking. I was the opposite. I was always the quiet one, which always bothered me, but I had a very hard time conversing with anyone.

I'm 46 now, and I just got diagnosed with ADHD, inattentive type, December 2016. I went to a licensed counselor, who tested me, and it clearly showed, that I was strongly in the inattentive ADHD category. He couldn't prescribe meds, so sent the info to my physician. I've been on meds and it helps. Don't think I have just the right dosage or type of med yet, but it's still early. My wife has been on ADHD meds for years, for that and also BED, and she's the one who recommended me going to get tested - we've only been married about 2 years.

If you haven't already, I would definitely go to a licensed counselor/psychologist or psychiatrist specifically for getting tested for ADHD. You mentioned you have seen doctors due to your bike accident, but I didn't notice whether the issue of ADHD specifically came up, so maybe that's why they didn't address it. I didn't read all posts, if they did, please forgive me.

I believe my college years and years in between now would have been much more successful and smoother if I had been diagnosed during those years.
Thanks. I feel I should clarify with my talking. I'm usually hesitant to say something unless I know I'm correct or I know what's going on, but I do love adding my two cents to a conversation. I tend to start talking a lot (too much on certain and semi frequent occasions) if I know what I'm talking about or if I like the subject. I've occasionally received comments that I talk to much or I see it on peoples faces where they're like "ok, we get it, please shut up now".