View Full Version : Doctor will not prescribe meds


guffman44
05-17-17, 08:49 PM
So apparently because:

1. I have more than 10 drinks per week.
2. Suddenly have high blood pressure.
3. Am getting testosterone therapy.
4. Am taking a sleep med.
5. I'm a 58 year old male....in good shape.
6. Take daily Cialis......

the doctor I saw today won't prescribe any meds.

My life has been full of under achievement because of inattentive ADD. So now I can't get any meds for it.

So I ask you all.....is there any thing over the counter that helps with Inattentive ADD. Anything at all?

aur462
05-17-17, 11:03 PM
Caffeine is over the counter. Really, that's the only thing I'm aware of. To the extent there s anything else, I wouldn't put any stock in It, personally.

sarahsweets
05-18-17, 01:08 AM
Find a different doctor. If those are really the reasons and they arent any others you wouldnt want a doctor that ignorant treating you anyway.

guffman44
05-18-17, 10:00 PM
Caffeine is over the counter. Really, that's the only thing I'm aware of. To the extent there s anything else, I wouldn't put any stock in It, personally.

Thought I might try Focus Factor. Might not work, but worth a try. I'm kind of at a point in my life where I have to try some stuff.

Caffeine in the morning is fine, however it has to be in small doses. Otherwise my brain gets even more scrambled.

guffman44
05-18-17, 10:06 PM
Find a different doctor. If those are really the reasons and they arent any others you wouldnt want a doctor that ignorant treating you anyway.

She would make me sign a statement that pretty much said that I promised not to drink, smoke weed (which I don't anyway), or sin in any way.....okay, I'm just kidding on the last one. But it was pretty draconian, and there would be drug testing. I won't be going back. She pretty much wanted control of part of my life just for an ADD drug.

peripatetic
05-18-17, 10:50 PM
She would make me sign a statement that pretty much said that I promised not to drink, smoke weed (which I don't anyway), or sin in any way.....okay, I'm just kidding on the last one. But it was pretty draconian, and there would be drug testing. I won't be going back. She pretty much wanted control of part of my life just for an ADD drug.

hold up...did she actually tell you that? that you would have to sign a statement?

that's really weird. i mean...really weird.

can you switch doctors?

guffman44
05-18-17, 11:17 PM
Yeah, it is weird. I thought maybe they were just a lot more strict with those type of meds these days. Or maybe she was worried I'd booze it up one night while on Adderall and I'd have a heart attack and my relatives would sue her. Maybe she's just ultra conservative with prescriptions.

I am going to try to find a different doctor. Maybe a psychiatrist this time. And I'm going to be more strict with my drinking. A beer every now and then instead of bourbon almost every day.

I will also add this: I tried Ritalin and Dexedrine back in the early 90's. Got it from a psychiatrist. She never asked how much I drank or anything else. Of course, I was in my 30's then. In the 2000's, another Psychiatrist gave me Strattera to try. Never had to get a blood test or anything.

peripatetic
05-18-17, 11:25 PM
i didn't realise this wasn't a psychiatrist you saw. i would highly encourage you to see one because it sounds like your general practitioner just isn't comfortable with prescribing the medications and perhaps because lacking enough information.

PoppnNSailinMan
05-20-17, 11:16 PM
i didn't realise this wasn't a psychiatrist you saw. i would highly encourage you to see one because it sounds like your general practitioner just isn't comfortable with prescribing the medications and perhaps because lacking enough information.

My own primary care doctor (and I think he's a good doctor) also isn't comfortable prescribing medications for mental health conditions. He referred me instead to a psychiatrist.

Lunacie
05-21-17, 10:20 AM
I agree with the advice to find a different doctor, preferably a psychiatrist.

You are in good shape if you only developed hypertension at your age.
I began taking a blood pressure med at 42, and my daughter who is now 43
began taking the same med this year.

I don't drink at all, but 10 drinks a week doesn't sound excessive to me. So
many use alcohol and other things to self-medicate and find that once they
start taking the right medication they no longer want to drink alcohol or coffee.

Most of the over the counter stuff is worthless for this, but there have been
studies done on Omega 3 fish oil supplements that shows they work for some
of us. I myself have been taking it for 14 years and it works so well I've never
asked for a stimulant med.

phlylady
05-21-17, 02:13 PM
Both my psychiatrist and my daughter's psychiatrist have policies that you have to sign on to that say you won't go to any other doctor for your meds, you won't get early refills so don't bother asking, you won't use illegal drugs and you agree to random urine screens, and you can be referred elsewhere or have your treatment modality changed if you are suspected of abusing your medication. I think that's pretty standard. Some psychiatrists go a little overboard, I think, on the "warning signs" of someone with substance abuse problems, like the alcohol use. I agree a second opinion might be helpful.

guffman44
05-22-17, 09:57 PM
I am going to get a second opinion.

I think this doctor's agreement she wanted me to sign was draconian. I know there are people out there that do this, but I have no desire to doctor shop. I just want to get better, yet be able to have the ability to go out and have a good time now and then. And no, that does not mean delving into illegal drugs. But I should be able to have a few drinks.

Kunga Dorji
05-23-17, 04:24 AM
She would make me sign a statement that pretty much said that I promised not to drink, smoke weed (which I don't anyway), or sin in any way.....okay, I'm just kidding on the last one. But it was pretty draconian, and there would be drug testing. I won't be going back. She pretty much wanted control of part of my life just for an ADD drug.

High blood pressure + smoking is a definite risk factor for a stroke.
Drinking 10+ standard drinks/week would be expected to increase the risk for a stroke.
All good so far- that is your problem.

However - if the doctor prescribes stimulants that increases the risk of higher blood pressure and increases the risk of a stroke- but medicolegally the blame can be pinned on the prescribing doctor.

Its not a matter of wanting control of your life, it is a matter of her not wanting to take a risk either with your life or her career.

sarahsweets
05-23-17, 05:55 AM
It really p*sses me off when doctors assume an addiction risk before anything even happens.

RextheDog
05-23-17, 01:51 PM
Well, he admitted to 10 (TEN) drinks a day.... so.....

Lunacie
05-23-17, 01:54 PM
Well, he admitted to 10 (TEN) drinks a day.... so.....

No. He said 10 drinks a WEEK. Fairly large difference there.

guffman44
05-23-17, 08:30 PM
10 drinks a week is correct. Not 10 drinks daily. No way I could do that, or even want to.

I will say that my blood pressure has been high lately, and I guess I will have to go on medication. Today it was 160/102, taken by a medical professional. So no way I can go on meds until it's under control.

sarahsweets
05-24-17, 04:29 AM
Well, he admitted to 10 (TEN) drinks a day.... so.....

Where did you get this from?? Re-read that post and you will see it was not per day but per week.

Swissy
05-24-17, 12:01 PM
Before my ADD diagnosis, I tried everything OTC. Ginko supplement, focus factor, neuro clarity, energy drinks, B vitamins (all of them), vitamin C... the list goes on. I exercise, eat healthy, had my thyroid checked and treated... so when I say I tried everything, you get the picture. Nothing worked for my fatigue, memory issues, disorganization and the anxiety of wondering what I am going to forget and how it will affect my (or others) life. Until I sought help and started adderall I was a walking cyclone of ADD hell. Sorry you are having trouble getting meds to help. I hope you find a doctor who listens to you and is willing to treat you.

guffman44
05-27-17, 08:53 AM
Before my ADD diagnosis, I tried everything OTC. Ginko supplement, focus factor, neuro clarity, energy drinks, B vitamins (all of them), vitamin C... the list goes on. I exercise, eat healthy, had my thyroid checked and treated... so when I say I tried everything, you get the picture. Nothing worked for my fatigue, memory issues, disorganization and the anxiety of wondering what I am going to forget and how it will affect my (or others) life. Until I sought help and started adderall I was a walking cyclone of ADD hell. Sorry you are having trouble getting meds to help. I hope you find a doctor who listens to you and is willing to treat you.

I am 58 years old, and am a classic underachiever. I have been fired and laid off from jobs. I have a good paying job right now with great benefits, but I hate the job, and worry every Friday that I'm going to be called in and fired. My body is not hyper, but my mind is. Ear worms(songs) play in my head the whole day. Inability to concentrate, easily distracted, can't remember things pertinent to my job. I'm in a technical field talking to customers on the phone all day, and I fix their issues for the most part. But I really don't understand how or why most of it is fixed. It's the way I've been trained.

However, I don't lack intelligence. I am a master of trivia. I love cars, and used to be able to tell you all the available features on any production car. History fascinates me. Science sometimes does. Metaphysics, time travel and politics hold my attention. My girlfriend is amazed that I remember in detail about our first few dates, and the details about my childhood way back from at least 3 years old.

In school I was tested as having an above average IQ. In 4th grade I was a B and C student. They did some crazy educational experiments back in the late 60's and early 70's, and one of them that I experienced was putting smart 5th graders and...er...underachieving 6th graders in the same class, thinking the 5th grader achievements would cause the 6th graders to compete and work harder. That didn't work. I was one of the 5th graders chosen for this....1 of 2 in my class of 25. So apparently, certain people saw something in me, despite my average grades. Unfortunately, I didn't perform any better in this class, and was actually somewhat worse. My whole school life is filled with average to below average grades....unless it really, really interested me.

I could say so much more, but I don't want to drone on. It was so disappointing wasting time and money seeing this doctor, and being turned down for medication. I feel like this is one of my last chances to turn things around. Seems like everyone claims to have ADD now. If they forget something, or are not paying attention for a few moments in a day, they think they have ADD. They have no idea what it's really like. To be in a fog most of the day. To have someone speaking to you, but not really hearing a word they say because your mind is off somewhere else. To feel you have the brains to be an accomplished, successful person, yet not be able to put in all together because your brain messes you up instead of helping you achieve. My report cards in grade school always said things like, "Mark could be a straight A student if he didn't day dream so much." People I worked with in the past commented on my intelligence, and wondered why I did so little with it. It was just assumed by family, friends, co-workers, and school chums that I was just lazy. And I believed them, until I learned about ADD. They have no idea the things I go through every day just to survive at work, and life for that matter.

So I feel your pain. I just wish the people who love me could feel mine, just for one or two days. Then they would know why their dad, boyfriend, friend, coworker is the way he is. They would know that I'm not lazy or dumb. I'm just terminally confused.

Kunga Dorji
05-27-17, 10:23 PM
I am 58 years old, and am a classic underachiever. I have been fired and laid off from jobs. I have a good paying job right now with great benefits, but I hate the job, and worry every Friday that I'm going to be called in and fired. My body is not hyper, but my mind is. Ear worms(songs) play in my head the whole day. Inability to concentrate, easily distracted, can't remember things pertinent to my job. I'm in a technical field talking to customers on the phone all day, and I fix their issues for the most part. But I really don't understand how or why most of it is fixed. It's the way I've been trained.

However, I don't lack intelligence. I am a master of trivia. I love cars, and used to be able to tell you all the available features on any production car. History fascinates me. Science sometimes does. Metaphysics, time travel and politics hold my attention. My girlfriend is amazed that I remember in detail about our first few dates, and the details about my childhood way back from at least 3 years old.

In school I was tested as having an above average IQ. In 4th grade I was a B and C student. They did some crazy educational experiments back in the late 60's and early 70's, and one of them that I experienced was putting smart 5th graders and...er...underachieving 6th graders in the same class, thinking the 5th grader achievements would cause the 6th graders to compete and work harder. That didn't work. I was one of the 5th graders chosen for this....1 of 2 in my class of 25. So apparently, certain people saw something in me, despite my average grades. Unfortunately, I didn't perform any better in this class, and was actually somewhat worse. My whole school life is filled with average to below average grades....unless it really, really interested me.

I could say so much more, but I don't want to drone on. It was so disappointing wasting time and money seeing this doctor, and being turned down for medication. I feel like this is one of my last chances to turn things around. Seems like everyone claims to have ADD now. If they forget something, or are not paying attention for a few moments in a day, they think they have ADD. They have no idea what it's really like. To be in a fog most of the day. To have someone speaking to you, but not really hearing a word they say because your mind is off somewhere else. To feel you have the brains to be an accomplished, successful person, yet not be able to put in all together because your brain messes you up instead of helping you achieve. My report cards in grade school always said things like, "Mark could be a straight A student if he didn't day dream so much." People I worked with in the past commented on my intelligence, and wondered why I did so little with it. It was just assumed by family, friends, co-workers, and school chums that I was just lazy. And I believed them, until I learned about ADD. They have no idea the things I go through every day just to survive at work, and life for that matter.

So I feel your pain. I just wish the people who love me could feel mine, just for one or two days. Then they would know why their dad, boyfriend, friend, coworker is the way he is. They would know that I'm not lazy or dumb. I'm just terminally confused.


One thing that bugs me a great deal is that the medications are not given on a trial basis.

People, even doctors, often have a wrong idea about what ADHD is, or they will use diagnostic questionnaires that are not as good as they are supposed to be, then refuse to diagnose on the basis of those questionnaires.

Equally, there may be some risk factors like high blood pressure, but it is possible to buy or hire a blood pressure monitor cheaply and see for yourself whether an adverse reaction occurs with the blood pressure.

Furthermore, a good third of the population do not benefit from stimulants.

However for those who have ADHD,stimulants like dexamphetamine, adderall, and ritalin often have a clear cut effect in the first day or so. I vividly remember my improved function on my first day of treatment.

I am very firm in my belief that we should be more open to giving people a therapeutic trial of medications.

The frustrating part of this is that these medications are not addictive (though people can get silly ideas about them and misuse them) and not particularly harmful if sensibly used.

I have seen one study that looked at recreational drugs which included methylphenidate:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=Ranking+the+Harm+of+Alcohol%2C+Tobacco+and+I llicit+Drugs+for+the+Individual+and+the+Population
[quote]
The harm indicators that were scored were acute and chronic toxicity, addictive potency and social harm.



Based on the available data in the literature, fact sheets were written which described the state of the art on the following issues: acute and chronic toxicity, addictive potency, social harm, and the prevalence of use


[quote]


Now in this study a relative harm of 1.0 meant the same harm as taking nothing at all.
Methylphenidate (Ritalin): mean harm score 0.85


That means it is (according to this metanalysis of a number of studies) better to be on Ritalin than off it-- for anybody!


Im sure that some would challenge my interpretation, but I do think that is a reasonable way to look at it.


Medications are far from being the only approach to managing ADHD, and they dont always to all that is needed, but they are worth a try.

aeon
05-27-17, 11:01 PM
Find a doctor with some experience in treating ADHD, and for sure, get your blood pressure under control.


Cheers,
Ian

TylerDurdon
06-06-17, 01:46 PM
I've been taking 12 hour Sudafed for it and it works short-term, but only if your blooed pressure is under control. I'm on Losartan for BP and that seems work well without many side effects.

Jenn1202
06-06-17, 11:38 PM
Your doctor probably doesn't want to risk putting you on medication that could potentially interact with alcohol and raise your blood pressure.

10 drinks a week
As far as I know alcohol interacts with stimulants. These interactions can cause serious side effects.

High blood pressure
Stimulants tend to raise your blood pressure, which can be really bad for your health if you already have high blood pressure. High blood pressure can kill you in extreme cases.

sarahsweets
06-11-17, 04:42 AM
Your doctor probably doesn't want to risk putting you on medication that could potentially interact with alcohol and raise your blood pressure.
Then his doctor is being ridiculous. Plenty of people can tolerate alcohol and still take stimulants.

10 drinks a week
As far as I know alcohol interacts with stimulants. These interactions can cause serious side effects.

How so? I know that if you take stimulants while drinking alcohol or near to drinking alcohol you can not feel as drunk as you actually are. I know that mixing the two (taking a stimulant while drinking) isnt good. But someone who takes a stimulant in the moring and then has a beer in the evening is not going to have an interaction.
I am an alcoholic so I cant say whether 10 drinks a weeks is too much but it still doesnt make sense that it would be the deciding factor in whether or not t prescribe stimulants.

finallyfound10
06-11-17, 07:16 PM
Hypertension increases with as we age (especially systolic, the top one) and 58 is young to have it. (I'm an RN have had many patients who were much younger than you though.)

Drinking alcohol also increases blood pressure. The link below is from the American Heart Association. It says men should limit drinks to 2/day which would be 14/week BUT that is very, very general. For some people 10/week is simply too much.

http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/HighBloodPressure/MakeChangesThatMatter/Limiting-Alcohol-to-Manage-High-Blood-Pressure_UCM_303244_Article.jsp#.WT3Mlca1vIU

I would definitely go to a Psychiatrist especially one that has experience treating ADHD.

CharlesH
06-11-17, 10:07 PM
Sometimes there's a difference between policies on paper versus how things actually happen in real life. The seemingly draconian contract could simply be to protect the doctor's liability if the patient does end up abusing the drug. It doesn't necessarily mean that your doctor intends on enforcing every invasive provision in it.

For what it's worth, the health clinic that my former PCP worked in had a random drug test policy for stimulants. My PCP and I had a good and trusting relationship, but he had no choice over the policy. What I'm trying to say is that I'd suggest that you evaluate your physician in the context of his/her broader actions, and not solely focus on the contract.

Whether it's fair or not, doctors often get blamed when things don't go well for their patients. Look at the doctors being blamed for the opioid crisis. Or look at that sensationalist NYT article which blamed the suicide of a young college graduate on the doctors who had prescribed him Adderall. All it takes is one bad patient for a doctor to lose his/her DEA license, which effectively ruins their entire career that he/she worked hard for.

mrh235
06-11-17, 10:30 PM
I'd see a new doctor, that doctor sounds like an uncooperative excuse-ridden knucklehead. Even if you stopped the energy drinks it seems like he'd have a million other excuses. He can control your bp and put you on a stimulant medicine.

I'd definitely try for a new doctor that is better at listening and working with you and understanding.

mrh235
06-12-17, 02:58 AM
I should also note doctors are paid way too much to not understand your issues and not treat you properly. If they won't treat your condition, and understand you, that's just plain unacceptable. At the very minimum they should be able to work with you, not try to brow-beat you with their opinions. If he has no problem taking your money he should have no problem understanding and working with you.

I'm in medical school, and honestly if I was the doc in this situation I'd see if there were any existing issues aside from energy drinks contributing to your hypertension, address them with the appropriate medicine, and work to replace energy drinks with the proper ADHD medicine. It's unacceptable the way some doctors are these days. They should be ashamed of how they treat patients.

Tell him that before he pulls the not treating your ADHD business he should try walking a moment in your shoes and try understanding what it's like to not have your ADHD treated.

sarahsweets
06-12-17, 06:06 AM
I could say so much more, but I don't want to drone on. It was so disappointing wasting time and money seeing this doctor, and being turned down for medication. I feel like this is one of my last chances to turn things around. Seems like everyone claims to have ADD now.
I think the misdiagnosis' in the past as well as lack of understanding of adults with adhd lead to more diagnosis' because it is understood better. Especially with girls who are notoriously underdiagnosed.

If they forget something, or are not paying attention for a few moments in a day, they think they have ADD. They have no idea what it's really like. To be in a fog most of the day. To have someone speaking to you, but not really hearing a word they say because your mind is off somewhere else. To feel you have the brains to be an accomplished, successful person, yet not be able to put in all together because your brain messes you up instead of helping you achieve. My report cards in grade school always said things like, "Mark could be a straight A student if he didn't day dream so much." People I worked with in the past commented on my intelligence, and wondered why I did so little with it. It was just assumed by family, friends, co-workers, and school chums that I was just lazy. And I believed them, until I learned about ADD. They have no idea the things I go through every day just to survive at work, and life for that matter.

People throw the phrase " Im so adhd today" as well as "I have ocd" or "Im so bipolar referencing opposing moods. I think its the awareness coupled with misunderstanding.

mrh235
06-13-17, 03:31 PM
I think the misdiagnosis' in the past as well as lack of understanding of adults with adhd lead to more diagnosis' because it is understood better. Especially with girls who are notoriously underdiagnosed.


People throw the phrase " Im so adhd today" as well as "I have ocd" or "Im so bipolar referencing opposing moods. I think its the awareness coupled with misunderstanding.


I'm glad more people are being diagnosed. The tragedy is the medical field is often extremely short-sighted, and many doctors can be very assuming, judgmental, and overgeneralize so that probably still prevents a lot of people with ADHD being properly diagnosed and receiving the treatment they truly need. It's way too often we hear about and witness doctors say stuff like "ADHD goes away in adulthood", "you're not hyperactive in a traditional sense so you dont have ADHD", and "you seem to be able to focus so you don't have ADHD". That sort of misunderstanding is appalling, and although the understanding of ADHD is better than it was years ago, it has a long way to go away.

When people throw around those phrases it really bugs me. It bugs me when people say "i'm so ADHD". There's so many more appropriate adjectives to use instead of using a mental health condition to describe something that isn't even remotely related.

Johnny Slick
06-13-17, 05:40 PM
There is a weird dichotomy there too. People will say "oh I'm sooo ADHD" but on the flip side when I see people, like, actually exhibit behavior that really, really looks like ADHD they'll deny that that's really the issue or what have you. For instance I was talking to a co worker last week and she has, like, some of the symptoms of it like to a tee - getting supremely frustrated by slow-talkers in meetings to the point that she's made a scene about it in the past, happiest doing things when she gets to kind of flit around from one skillset to another several times over the course of a day, able to carry on and on on very diverse subjects (which, don't get me wrong, is a thing I'm "good" at too, but... well, that's the point) but then when I introduced it, talking more about my own stuff, she was like "oh, no, that's not me, I'm way too organized for that".

At the end of the day, too, it's not causing her undue stress - I mean, she's a complete Type A personality as well but she seems to enjoy being the master of her domain - so I wasn't going to push it, but the point is this: I don't think the "oh I'm so ADD" actually *helps* a lot of the time because it reinforces stereotypes that aren't always true and then, to the extent that they are true, are perhaps only true for a specific subset of people who have the condition (particularly middle class white men). As a person who had it for years and years and just plain didn't know because, in spite of thinking I knew what it was I really didn't, I think we as a society need to be more cognizant of this.

sarahsweets
06-14-17, 05:51 AM
I don't think the "oh I'm so ADD" actually *helps* a lot of the time because it reinforces stereotypes that aren't always true and then, to the extent that they are true, are perhaps only true for a specific subset of people who have the condition (particularly middle class white men). As a person who had it for years and years and just plain didn't know because, in spite of thinking I knew what it was I really didn't, I think we as a society need to be more cognizant of this.

I dont think it helps either. As if you an just be "adhd" in the mornings but not in the afternoon. Sort of like people who only have adhd at work or school/