View Full Version : Diagnose me ...


puppylover
05-23-17, 06:00 PM
Hi. Just chatted with my primary physician and it was recommended that I talk to a psychiatrist. Deep down I know my chronic procrastination will delay that for a while, so I was hoping to post here to see if I have a real problem or if it's in my head.

Here are some facts about me, not all necessarily tied to ADD:

Always struggled just to be average in school
Had to have one on one tutoring as a kid
Had to sit in the desk next to the teacher at one point :(
Never on honors list, obviously
Friends often said it seemed like I was always high
Got my masters!! I was on academic probation throughout the entire process though
Have held a steady job since graduation, but haven't achieved anything I was hoping to - continuing my trend of struggling to be average
In my job I'm supposed to take notes during meetings, I usually zone out and only have a bullet point or two. People ask me about the meeting and it's hard for me to recall anything.
Struggle with what I believe to be social anxiety as well, I'm very uncomfortable in social situations especially one on one on the phone with someone
I procrastinate with tasks, whether it's making that damn dermatologist appointment that I've been putting off for years or reading an email that I think contains something that will make me uncomfortable
I'll procrastinate works tasks and tell myself I'll catch up at night or on the weekend, but I don't
I want more, I just feel stuck and want something to help me out of this
I feel like my mind is always in a fog
Love the idea of sex but cannot make the effort to do it. I'm in a relationship.


I'm sure I can benefit from something like Adderall (well, everyone can). But I'm curious if I have symptoms of ADD or if I'm just lazy and stupid. I do not have ADHD; though sometimes I wish I was hyperactive, I'm the complete opposite.

What do you all think?

Greyhound1
05-23-17, 07:23 PM
Welcome to the forum.

It sounds like you may have some of the symptoms of inattentive ADHD. You don't have to be hyperactive to have ADHD. The disorder presents itself in 3 ways. They are inattentive, hyperactive and combined.

It may be worth getting evaluated by your psychiatrist when you have the appointment.

Good luck with it.

Impromptu_DTour
05-23-17, 10:23 PM
i think its very worth seeing a psychiatrist and (with an open mind) pursue an examination where you let the exam speak for itself, rather than to nurture it.

seeking a diagnosis online, at one point, nearly led me to believe that i was pregnant (and im a man!).

its also really easy to succumb to a condition that medical students often fall prey to, Medical Student Disease (or Syndrome).. (its an actual thing, AKA Intern Syndrome, and Second Term Syndrome). basically due to research, you basically commit yourself to believing that you have the disease or disorder you're studying, up to and including the expression of symptoms, sympathetically.

Im not trying to say that you might not have anything that needs specific and direct attention (congratulations on completing a Master's btw). But be careful to allow an examiner to examine you without interference or bias. It would suck to struggle an entire lifetime, and be diagnosed with something that you dont have, believing that you do, and be treated for.. when the entire time it was.. that damn Red Dye-5.. :lol:

There could be a ton of reasons why you're experiencing the challenges that you have been (and continue to be) facing. Using ADHD merely as an example, ADHD in and of itself is a syndrome of symptoms.. that through the magnitude of their manifestation, are (with their powers combined..!) ADHD.. but each symptom, can and very very often is shared by other disorders, or health issues, or even simply paddings of personality and emotional intelligence developments, and coping mechanisms.

TL;DR

definitely encourage you to see a psychiatrist. probably look for someone who specializes in performance, focus, motivation, career.. as well as things like adhd and learning disorders and such.

give the exam the benefit of the doubt that it will bring you closer to the answer that you need... and allow yourself to be open to an answer that you might not be looking for (try not to go into it expecting an outcome.. else your answers/responses, might botch the tests).

outside of that.. welcome to the forum

iDTour

sarahsweets
05-24-17, 09:24 AM
Hi. Just chatted with my primary physician and it was recommended that I talk to a psychiatrist. Deep down I know my chronic procrastination will delay that for a while, so I was hoping to post here to see if I have a real problem or if it's in my head.

Here are some facts about me, not all necessarily tied to ADD:

Always struggled just to be average in school
Had to have one on one tutoring as a kid
Had to sit in the desk next to the teacher at one point :(
Never on honors list, obviously
Friends often said it seemed like I was always high
Got my masters!! I was on academic probation throughout the entire process though
Have held a steady job since graduation, but haven't achieved anything I was hoping to - continuing my trend of struggling to be average
In my job I'm supposed to take notes during meetings, I usually zone out and only have a bullet point or two. People ask me about the meeting and it's hard for me to recall anything.
Struggle with what I believe to be social anxiety as well, I'm very uncomfortable in social situations especially one on one on the phone with someone
I procrastinate with tasks, whether it's making that damn dermatologist appointment that I've been putting off for years or reading an email that I think contains something that will make me uncomfortable
I'll procrastinate works tasks and tell myself I'll catch up at night or on the weekend, but I don't
I want more, I just feel stuck and want something to help me out of this
I feel like my mind is always in a fog
Love the idea of sex but cannot make the effort to do it. I'm in a relationship.


I'm sure I can benefit from something like Adderall (well, everyone can). But I'm curious if I have symptoms of ADD or if I'm just lazy and stupid. I do not have ADHD; though sometimes I wish I was hyperactive, I'm the complete opposite.

What do you all think?


Top 10 Signs- Adult ADHD

No. 1: Trouble Getting Organized

For people with ADHD, the responsibilities of adulthood -- bills, jobs, and
children, to name a few -- can make problems with organization more obvious and more problematic than in childhood.

No. 2: Reckless Driving and Traffic Accidents

ADHD makes it hard to keep your attention on a task, so spending time behind the wheel of a car can be hard. ADHD symptoms can make some people more likely to speed, have traffic accidents, and lose their driver’s licenses.


ADHD in Adults
Start
No. 3: Marital Trouble

Many people without ADHD have marital problems, so a troubled marriage shouldn’t necessarily be seen as a red flag for adult ADHD. But there are some marriage problems that are likely to affect the relationships of those with ADHD. Often, the partners of people with undiagnosed ADHD take poor listening skills and an inability to honor commitments as a sign that their partner doesn’t care. If you’re the person with ADHD, you may not understand why your partner is upset, and you may feel you’re being nagged or blamed for something that’s not your fault.

No. 4: Extremely Distractible

ADHD is a problem with attention, so adult ADHD can make it hard to succeed in today’s fast-paced, hustle-bustle world. Many people find that distractibility can lead to a history of career under-performance, especially in noisy or busy offices. If you have adult ADHD, you might find that phone calls or email derail your attention, making it hard for you to finish tasks.

No. 5: Poor Listening Skills

Do you zone out during long business meetings? Did your husband forget to pick up your child at baseball practice, even though you called to remind him on his way home? Problems with attention result in poor listening skills in many adults with ADHD, leading to a lot of missed appointments and misunderstandings.




No. 6: Restlessness, Trouble Relaxing

While many children with ADHD are “hyperactive,” this ADHD symptom often appears differently in adults. Rather than bouncing off the walls, adults with ADHD are more likely to be restless or find they can’t relax. If you have adult ADHD, others might describe you as edgy or tense.

No. 7: Trouble Starting a Task

Just as children with ADHD often put off doing homework, adults with ADHD often drag their feet when starting tasks that require a lot of attention. This procrastination often adds to existing problems, including marital disagreements, workplace issues, and problems with friends.

No. 8: Lateness


ADHD in Adults

There are many reasons for this. First, adults with ADHD are often distracted on the way to an event, maybe realizing the car needs to be washed and then noticing they’re low on gas, and before they know it an hour has gone by. People with adult ADHD also tend to underestimate how much time it takes to finish a task, whether it’s a major assignment at work or a simple home repair.

No. 9: Angry Outbursts

ADHD often leads to problems with controlling emotions. Many people with adult ADHD are quick to explode over minor problems. Often, they feel as if they have no control over their emotions. Many times, their anger fades as quickly as it flared, long before the people who dealt with the outburst have gotten over the incident.

No. 10: Prioritizing Issues

Often, people with adult ADHD mis-prioritize, failing to meet big obligations, like a deadline at work, while spending countless hours on something insignificant.

Getting a Diagnosis

If you think you have adult ADHD, get examined by a trained and experienced mental health professional. It can be hard to diagnose because some possible symptoms -- like poor concentration or motivation, or relationship problems -- can also be signs of other conditions. Depression or substance abuse can have similar symptoms. Once you get checked out, you can get the best help for you and start feeling better.


According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders checklist, at least six of the following ADHD symptoms must apply to merit a diagnosis:

Inattention
Fails to give close attention to details or makes careless mistakes in schoolwork, work, or other activities.
Has difficulty sustaining attention in tasks or play activities.
Does not seem to listen when spoken to directly.
Does not follow through on instructions and fails to finish schoolwork, chores, or duties in the workplace (not due to oppositional behavior or failure to understand instructions).
Has difficulty organizing tasks and activities.
Avoids, dislikes, or is reluctant to engage in tasks that require sustained mental effort (such as schoolwork or homework).
Loses things necessary for tasks or activities (e.g., toys, school assignments, pencils, books, or tools).
Easily distracted by extraneous stimuli.
Forgetful in daily activities.
At least six of the following signs of hyperactivity-impulsivity must apply:

Hyperactivity
Fidgets with hands or feet or squirms in seat.
Leaves seat in classroom or in other situations in which remaining seated is expected.
Runs about or climbs excessively in situations in which it is inappropriate (in adolescents or adults, may be limited to subjective feelings of restlessness).
Has difficulty playing or engaging in leisure activities quietly.
Appears “on the go” or acts as if “driven by a motor.”
Talks excessively.
Impulsivity
Blurts out the answers before the questions have been completed.
Has difficulty awaiting turn.
Interrupts or intrudes on others (e.g., butts into conversations or games).
Some hyperactive-impulsive or inattentive symptoms that caused impairment were present before age 7.
Some impairment from the symptoms is present in two or more settings (e.g., at school [or work] and at home).
There must be clear evidence of clinically significant impairment in social, academic, or occupational functioning.
The symptoms do not occur exclusively during the course of a pervasive developmental disorder or other psychotic disorder, and are not better accounted for by another mental disorder (e.g., mood disorder, anxiety disorder, dissociative disorder, or a personality disorder).

puppylover
05-27-17, 01:10 PM
This might sound stupid but I'm now considering that rather then forgetting things or getting distracted I purposely procrastinate and ignore tasks due to the uncomfortable feelings my anxiety gives me. I originally thought a stimulant like adderall would help me power through the negative feeling to help me get things done, which it probably would do. But I'm now thinking that attacking the source (anxiety) is what I need to do. It took me four days to check this thread not because I was distracted but because I was afraid the responses would trigger my anxiety. They didn't, but I'm always worrying about that. I don't know. I guess my next step is to talk to someone and let them figure me out.

Thanks

aur462
05-27-17, 03:35 PM
This might sound stupid but I'm now considering that rather then forgetting things or getting distracted I purposely procrastinate and ignore tasks due to the uncomfortable feelings my anxiety gives me. I originally thought a stimulant like adderall would help me power through the negative feeling to help me get things done, which it probably would do. But I'm now thinking that attacking the source (anxiety) is what I need to do. It took me four days to check this thread not because I was distracted but because I was afraid the responses would trigger my anxiety. They didn't, but I'm always worrying about that. I don't know. I guess my next step is to talk to someone and let them figure me out.

Thanks

From what you've said, it sounds like you MIGHT have inattentive ADHD and social anxiety disorder. A note on Adderall, for those that have ADHD they tend to alleviate anxiety. Those with anxiety disorders (with or without ADHD) seem to more frequently get exacerbated anxiety. However, I've noticed those with social anxiety singing the praises of stimulants and their "pro-social" effect.

I had strong OCD/spectrum symptoms in late adolescence and early adulthood, which have abated a lot over time. I found stimulants WAY later than I wish I would have. Years of wasted time on AD's. The stimulant I first tried was Adderall. I finally found something that worked after wasting 17 years on meds from the same class.

Have you ever tried Adderall or similar stimulant? Just wanting to know if you're basing off of experience. The best/most efficient way of finding out if something works is trying it.

puppylover
05-27-17, 09:18 PM
Have you ever tried Adderall or similar stimulant? Just wanting to know if you're basing off of experience. The best/most efficient way of finding out if something works is trying it.

Tried it a few times, the initial euphoric rush works well the first couple hours, helps make it easy to get moving quickly and ignore any anxiety. It doesn't last long enough though.

aur462
05-27-17, 11:28 PM
Tried it a few times, the initial euphoric rush works well the first couple hours, helps make it easy to get moving quickly and ignore any anxiety. It doesn't last long enough though.

You'll find euphoria (or "false sense of well-being" (?!))to unfortunately abate after a while.

When the drug wears off you take another one..preferably before :)

Pilgrim
05-27-17, 11:44 PM
Every individual expresses ADD in a different way. It's worth getting a diagnosis by someone who specialises in this field. I use to get terrible social anxiety. Putting off uncomfortable situations was my specialty. The end result was depression and poor relationships. As said above be very open minded in your approach. Something that may help ; ask your mother what you were like as a child. Not your opinion, ask her what she thought. It's a complex condition be prepared for anything. You can almost feel that your not progressing. That's what I thought, I wish to God it had been spotted earlier, but I always knew I was a bit different. What you may do in the meantime is learn as much about the condition as possible.

someothertime
05-28-17, 01:13 AM
I ( and i'm sure many here ) can relate to what you've said..... great insight by the way.....

There is a person.... He has emotional dis regulation and memory processing issues...... Over time through their teenage years as a result of an inability to facilitate what is within they develop _ _ _ _ _ _ _?

IHMO, it is 1000 times easier to treat the ADHD first..... ( if present - if not then i'd suggest easier to disprove ), than treat the anxiety. Also, as others have mentioned ADHD treatment in many cases can do wonders for anxiety..... Anxiety treatment will no little for ADHD in ten times the time.

phlylady
05-28-17, 05:26 AM
Not sure if you'll check this again :) but I can tell you I 100% relate to your avoidance thing! Mail was the biggest thing for me. If it came in a standard envelope that wasn't handwritten by a friend or relative, it probably wasn't good news and I didn't even open it. I would look up and pay all bills online so I didn't have to open them in the mail. Same with answering the phone if I didn't know who was calling or wasn't expecting a call. Same with checking my email sometimes even if I thought someone might be upset with me and would email me to complain. Same with going to the doctor about some worrying symptom for fear he'd give me bad news.

Adderall helps with that. :D

puppylover
05-28-17, 06:48 PM
ask your mother what you were like as a child

I forgot that my parents also sent me to a therapist when I was in 6/7th grade. I'm not entirely sure why though, misbehaving at home I guess. Not sure.

Mail was the biggest thing for me. If it came in a standard envelope that wasn't handwritten by a friend or relative, it probably wasn't good news and I didn't even open it.

This is my wife, she'll open all of our mail because if she let's it sit her anxiety drives her crazy. I'm OK with physical mail, mainly because I'm confident nothing bad will come. Thanks for the insight, I'm torn between going the xanax or adderall route.

superherobootca
05-30-17, 12:15 AM
Hi. Just chatted with my primary physician and it was recommended that I talk to a psychiatrist. Deep down I know my chronic procrastination will delay that for a while, so I was hoping to post here to see if I have a real problem or if it's in my head.

Here are some facts about me, not all necessarily tied to ADD:

Always struggled just to be average in school
Had to have one on one tutoring as a kid
Had to sit in the desk next to the teacher at one point :(
Never on honors list, obviously
Friends often said it seemed like I was always high
Got my masters!! I was on academic probation throughout the entire process though
Have held a steady job since graduation, but haven't achieved anything I was hoping to - continuing my trend of struggling to be average
In my job I'm supposed to take notes during meetings, I usually zone out and only have a bullet point or two. People ask me about the meeting and it's hard for me to recall anything.
Struggle with what I believe to be social anxiety as well, I'm very uncomfortable in social situations especially one on one on the phone with someone
I procrastinate with tasks, whether it's making that damn dermatologist appointment that I've been putting off for years or reading an email that I think contains something that will make me uncomfortable
I'll procrastinate works tasks and tell myself I'll catch up at night or on the weekend, but I don't
I want more, I just feel stuck and want something to help me out of this
I feel like my mind is always in a fog
Love the idea of sex but cannot make the effort to do it. I'm in a relationship.


I'm sure I can benefit from something like Adderall (well, everyone can). But I'm curious if I have symptoms of ADD or if I'm just lazy and stupid. I do not have ADHD; though sometimes I wish I was hyperactive, I'm the complete opposite.

What do you all think?

I have had a severe case all my life and because of my autism, I can actually see the symptoms that most people cannot. (People with ADHD tend to have different patterns of blinking their eyes and other body movements that no testing instrument will detect.) A psychologist I know spends about 4 hours in her testing.

At first blush, I am not seeing it. The things you mention can be symptoms of many things and are not specific to AD/HD. Nobody can diagnose you without seeing you. I actually watch the entire body movement and look at everything going back to about age 2.

Some of the symptoms you mention are also present in high functioning autism (Asperger's Syndrome). It would be more apparent in your speech patterns, interpersonal skills, perceptions in social situations and many other areas.

Talk to a professional that is an expert in ADHD, nobody can diagnose you online.

VoxPopuli
05-31-17, 04:09 PM
Not sure if you'll check this again :) but I can tell you I 100% relate to your avoidance thing! Mail was the biggest thing for me. If it came in a standard envelope that wasn't handwritten by a friend or relative, it probably wasn't good news and I didn't even open it. I would look up and pay all bills online so I didn't have to open them in the mail. Same with answering the phone if I didn't know who was calling or wasn't expecting a call. Same with checking my email sometimes even if I thought someone might be upset with me and would email me to complain. Same with going to the doctor about some worrying symptom for fear he'd give me bad news.

Adderall helps with that. :D

Wow, that explains a lot...I never knew avoidance was associated with ADD!? When I first moved out on my own...I used to put my bills in a shoe box, eventually I began to ignore the ones I didn't have the money to pay...took me a LONG time to get around it. Since the advent of direct pay and internet shopping, I don't have the problem any longer. Of course, it may be due more to the long process where this revulsion impacted my credit and caused a period where I lived on cash for 5 years...so I probably learned more from that...but I'm sure the electronic deposit and direct pay options have helped.

aur462
05-31-17, 05:09 PM
Wow, that explains a lot...I never knew avoidance was associated with ADD!? When I first moved out on my own...I used to put my bills in a shoe box, eventually I began to ignore the ones I didn't have the money to pay...took me a LONG time to get around it. Since the advent of direct pay and internet shopping, I don't have the problem any longer. Of course, it may be due more to the long process where this revulsion impacted my credit and caused a period where I lived on cash for 5 years...so I probably learned more from that...but I'm sure the electronic deposit and direct pay options have helped.

My wife has always avoided mail. I never understood it. I think it's one of those "My mental overhead is too much as is; I don't have time to check the mail and/or the ability to sift through it." I think it's a combo of avoidance and procrastination. I don't have a problem opening the mail, it's responding to its contents that get me ;) - procrastination.

Greyhound1
05-31-17, 10:38 PM
Checking email is my biggest hurdle. I think, I avoid it because it's either spam or something or someone I am going to have to respond back to.

It's strange because I always open and read my PM's I receive here immediately. They are even way more likely to initiate the need for a reply or response on my part.

PM's are more stimulating which is what we seek with ADHD.

VoxPopuli
06-01-17, 01:16 PM
I hate email so much, I try to handle whatever is needed in one email reply, or before I hang up on the initial phone call. The constant pinging back-and-forth drives me more bonkers than knowing there's an incomplete email out there...