View Full Version : Question: if I took the same genetic tests every year..?


mildadhd
05-24-17, 10:33 PM
Question.

If I took what are considered all the most reliable genetic tests known for everything, every month of every year, for a life time, should I get fairly consistent test results over time (along with any new test results due to possible improvements in testing methods)?

I really do not know, I wish I had the money to do the experiment.



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mildadhd
05-24-17, 11:33 PM
Question #2

If a child was diagnosed with AD(H)D, was one of the people who has a genetic variant associated with AD(H)D, and later in life was one of the people that "grows out" of AD(H)D.

Would the person still test positive for the genetic variant associated with AD(H)D?


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namazu
05-25-17, 01:42 AM
If I took what are considered all the most reliable genetic tests known for everything, every month of every year, for a life time, should I get fairly consistent test results over time (along with any new test results due to possible improvements in testing methods)?
Yes, you should get fairly consistent results over time throughout your life.


If a child was diagnosed with AD(H)D, was one of the people who has a genetic variant associated with AD(H)D, and later in life was one of the people that "grows out" of AD(H)D.

Would the person still test positive for the genetic variant associated with AD(H)D?
Yes, the person would still test positive for the genetic variant associated with ADHD.

It is possible for some genes to affect people differently at different points in time (because of gene silencing, interactions with other genes and hormones, environmental factors, etc.).

For example, even men (and women) who inherit alleles associated with "male-pattern" baldness are not generally bald when they are children. Testosterone levels and other developmental changes that occur during adolescence/adulthood influence the effects of the inherited alleles (and/or vice-versa). But the inherited alleles have been the same since conception, barring mutations. This does not mean that genes are unrelated to "male-pattern" baldness, just that genes don't always show all of their effects at birth.