View Full Version : Childhood Speech and Math


BricksAreHeavy
05-28-17, 02:38 PM
Is anyone familiar with the probability of a child with ADHD having difficulty with forms of speech and mathematics?

Though I was not officially diagnosed until 20 y/o, I'm now finding it interesting to dig into what could have been some results of ADHD as a child. Besides being extremely hyperactive, my emotional outbursts, and distractibility, I'm wondering if these are related.

For example -

- I did not speak until I was almost 4 years old, however, this was not extremely detrimental and did not follow me around forever
- I was in speech therapy in elementary school for rhotacism (impediment w/ the letter "r" and a few others)
- Though my reading comprehension was fine (tons of tutors and parental involvement), I was always in remedial math, like, to the severe point where I would barely pass. Still this way as an adult.

sjk123
05-31-17, 01:34 PM
The math problems sounds like dyscalculia, which I guess you're not familiar with. I have it myself and it causes me to have severe trouble with mental arithmetic, aswell as a few other things. Addition and subtraction is okay but I need total focus in order to do it, anything else, forget it. I had problems remembering left and right as a child, which is another symptom. Imaging how people are related if they are further apart then immediate family is also hard, and shows the main issue in dyscalculia which is thinking in steps.

I also had problems with pronounciation as a kid but these apparenlty went away quickly. I've always had some problems with my voice however, I've always had a strangled tight feeling in a throat that makes it hard to talk in a relaxed way, and it made my voice very nasal and painful to use. This might be because of my childhood traumas however, as anxiety can cause a tight throat, though mines been that way since I can remember. I also stutter when very anxious. Aside from that I think it's harder for me than others to talk expressively, I easily slur words and it feels a bit like I "hear" myself talk when I do it, like my thought processes aren't really in it. I also have severe social anxiety though, so it's hard to know what's ADD or just me being self-critical.

I suppose speech problems is typical with ADD. Guys I've seen on Youtube with ADD talk slightly slurry, choppy, make random pauses as if to catch up with their thoughts etc, just what I do myself.

aur462
05-31-17, 06:21 PM
- I did not speak until I was almost 4 years old, however, this was not extremely detrimental and did not follow me around forever
- I was in speech therapy in elementary school for rhotacism (impediment w/ the letter "r" and a few others)
- Though my reading comprehension was fine (tons of tutors and parental involvement), I was always in remedial math, like, to the severe point where I would barely pass. Still this way as an adult.

I was in remedial math by high school. My friends always told me I didn't belong there. Nonetheless, whether ADHD, LD, or both, I did belong there. This remedial placement followed me to college, until I took College Algebra and got a "D" for all my hard work :yes: My major accepted this grade, curiously enough. I'm not sure about "dyscalculia" I've recently learned about. I certainly don't have a good relationship with numbers, but don't know enough to say whether I was blessed with this. I certainly sucked at math for whatever reasons, but some of the criteria for dyscalculia don't fit me. Regardless, I feel retarded when I try to figure out if an item at the store is cheaper as I try to figure out if the price for buying the larger detergent is actually cheaper (per unit) than the smaller one. Just standing there for an inordinate amount of time, experimenting with the "methods" my mind (which may be part of larger conspiracy to make me feel ineffectual =>) suggests to try; the math portion of my mind seems to have a "mind of its own" - withholding greater mathematical intelligence that's available, allowing me to meander needlessly. Then again, it's entirely possible this so called "Math part of my mind" is not conspiring against me and I just need to review some basic math concepts ;>)

You had some developmental delays, and I did too from my understanding. I don't think speaking came as quickly for me as it should have, though I can't speak to (pun optional) how much of a delay there was.

sjk123
05-31-17, 07:16 PM
I still think its dyscalculia, remember that all diagnoses are a spectrum and you don't have to have all the symptoms. For example, many with dyscalculia struggle with maps and using a compass: being only able to read a map if it's held in the same direction that you're looking. I have no trouble at all with maps and directions, but did have some odd troubles learning to use one of those compasses that you set in a direction.

aur462
05-31-17, 10:16 PM
After a cursory look at some of the symptoms and manifestations, it seems quite possible I have this disorder. Something I hadn't considered is I seem, in my own judgment at least, to have taken a long time to understand an analog clock. I don't recall elementary being math problematic (forgetting is possible), but when elementary algebra came along in the 8th grade/pre-algebra perhaps, I floundered. If someone had a gun to my head (I'm happy to report no one does) and asked me whether I had a math L.D., I'd answer "yes"...and "please don't shoot me"...Being a "space case" undoubtedly didn't help my cause either.

dvdnvwls
05-31-17, 11:06 PM
I get the impression that certain areas or skills can be "knocked out" leaving the others relatively intact. I had language and reading quite strong and early, math pretty average, but with spatial understanding (such as "which key fits which lock" or "if you flip this shape over what will it look like" - or "now let's try parallel parking" :o) I'm hopeless.

sarahsweets
06-01-17, 06:00 AM
I was always good at reading, speaking and writing. I owe that to using books as an escape from trauma. Math I was terrible at. Now, due to me working at a deli when I was 18 I am quick with mental math when it comes to money or % off for shopping but I did terrible in any higher level math. I repeated algebra in school and barely met a requirement for my English degree. I think, (although I have zero scientific evidence to back it up), that people with adhd are more likely to struggle in one or both of these areas.