View Full Version : GPS tracker device


parkersharon
05-30-17, 03:08 AM
Any parents here have GPS trackers or similar on their little ones? Planning of getting one just in case. Any thoughts?

sarahsweets
05-30-17, 04:20 AM
I would not for a few reasons. I do not want to have any hacking issue if they are associated with a car or email account. If you have an iphone you can use "find my iphone" or "share your location". I like to trust my kids and not have them feel like I am always up their as*.

TygerSan
05-30-17, 05:54 AM
Are you talking about an app to keep track of your older children or a wrist band for a kid who runs away? The wristbands can be godsends for kids who are flight risks.

My sister once disappeared at a crowded carnival (she wasn't one who normally ran away but she got distracted by something shiny). That was well before the era of smartphones and gps trackers, but a wristband would've saved my dad a lot of grief.

silversurfer
05-30-17, 05:58 AM
I guess I would have to agree with @sarahsweets, you can just use your iPhone to track where they are.

Little Missy
05-30-17, 07:42 AM
Hoo-Wa, good thing those weren't around when I was a teenager. :D

Caco3girl
05-30-17, 08:43 AM
I use Life360 for my kids. I like it because it's easier than using find my iphone because I'm a parent who likes to be up my kids as*, lol. Seriously though if he says he's at the skating rink then he better BE at the skating rink. The app lets me know if he left and then came back.

I trust my kids, I trust them to BE kids and that means sneaking off and doing things they shouldn't just to see if they can. I don't let my now 10th grader have "sleep overs" because I know he's immature and doesn't ever think ahead, this can cause a serious problem in combination with other immature high schoolers.

Things aren't like they use to be. A stupid teenage moment can mean you get arrested and that can affect college choices and even future career choices. And teenage boys are all about stupid teenage moments. Local senior boy wanted to "borrow" a goat from a local farmer to tie a note around the goats neck saying "Will you GOAT with me to prom?"....he got caught grabbing the goat, got arrested, kicked off the baseball team, his scholarship was pulled for college....etc....poor choice indeed and it pretty much caused him to have to redo his whole life.

Yup, I will remain firmly up my kids as* and hope I can keep him from making more stupid choices than he already does.

dvdnvwls
05-30-17, 02:51 PM
When a parent is "up your as*", your aim in life becomes getting them out of there, and the further up they are, the further away you plan to get - and the worse things you will do when you get there.

Being the "up their as*" parent is the biggest and best way to encourage bad choices.

In high school it was easy to spot the girls whose parents were the most intrusive - they were the ones who got pregnant.

sarahsweets
05-30-17, 03:50 PM
I use Life360 for my kids. I like it because it's easier than using find my iphone because I'm a parent who likes to be up my kids as*, lol. Seriously though if he says he's at the skating rink then he better BE at the skating rink. The app lets me know if he left and then came back.

I trust my kids, I trust them to BE kids and that means sneaking off and doing things they shouldn't just to see if they can. I don't let my now 10th grader have "sleep overs" because I know he's immature and doesn't ever think ahead, this can cause a serious problem in combination with other immature high schoolers.
I agree that kids sneaking off to do things they shouldnt is part of being young and immature and of having little forethought. I just dont think gps trackers can take the place of showing up where they are supposed to be, or calling a parent beforehand. And now that iphone has enabled share your location, on demand should their be any doubt, I can request that location.


Things aren't like they use to be. A stupid teenage moment can mean you get arrested and that can affect college choices and even future career choices. And teenage boys are all about stupid teenage moments. Local senior boy wanted to "borrow" a goat from a local farmer to tie a note around the goats neck saying "Will you GOAT with me to prom?"....he got caught grabbing the goat, got arrested, kicked off the baseball team, his scholarship was pulled for college....etc....poor choice indeed and it pretty much caused him to have to redo his whole life.
I dont know, but I think these sorts of things will happen whether or not you can gps your kid, predict where they will be or be involved in all aspects of their social life. You can imagine the talks that go on in my house about drugs and alcohol but still, 2 of my kids were in situations that they tried pot. Because I do not assume they will make the wrong choices before they have a chance to do something, and because I have taught them that coming to me in all circumstances is safe, they both reached out to me, and I went and picked on of them up so because they knew they were in no condition to drive. I am not saying gps's are not going to help, but I do think there are lessons to be learned even in the bad stuff.
Yup, I will remain firmly up my kids as* and hope I can keep him from making more stupid choices than he already does.

Lunacie
05-30-17, 03:56 PM
My autistic granddaughter would never wear a wristband or gps tag or anything.

I was amazed when she agreed to wear a wristband at Disney World a couple
of years ago ... but mom must have told her she couldn't get on any rides
unless she had a wristband.

We were lucky that she only eloped a couple of times as a child. Once a cop
knocked on our door at 4 am asking if she lived here! I don't know how he got
her to talk to him as she wasn't very verbal yet.

The second time she didn't make it out of the driveway. She took my keys and
tried to start my car but it wouldn't start. Cost $85 to get the ignition fixed.
Then we put alarms on the doors.

dvdnvwls
05-30-17, 04:06 PM
There's a sort of continuum I guess, of kids' reasons for going somewhere. Maybe based on maturity, and on awareness of surroundings and awareness of real consequences of actions (as opposed to artificial "consequences" - punishments - from parents).

The way to handle situations where maturity and awareness are very low, I think has to be quite different from when they're very high. I think further that a lot of kids with ADHD are in a tricky sort of "mixed zone" where the same child will have vastly different maturity/awareness levels regarding different types of situations.

Overestimating OR underestimating a child's maturity is not helpful. It isn't better to err on the side of anything. It isn't safer or more effective, because there are always unintended consequences of erring. So trying to be as accurate and appropriate as you can is the best.

Fuzzy12
05-30-17, 07:37 PM
When a parent is "up your as*", your aim in life becomes getting them out of there, and the further up they are, the further away you plan to get - and the worse things you will do when you get there.

Being the "up their as*" parent is the biggest and best way to encourage bad choices.

In high school it was easy to spot the girls whose parents were the most intrusive - they were the ones who got pregnant.

They were the ones who got pregnant? ?????????

Is that your assumption or did you know each of these girls that well to have an accurate picture of hoe intrusive their parents are.

It must be difficult enough to deal with a teenage pregnancy but on top of that these girls suddenly have all these people who think they know exactly what's wrong with them and why they went off the tracks.

peripatetic
05-30-17, 09:52 PM
moderator note


this thread has veered off topic and all posts henceforth must return to the topic at hand--start a new thread if you want to discuss tangents.

here is the thread start/topic:
Any parents here have GPS trackers or similar on their little ones? Planning of getting one just in case. Any thoughts?

cheers,
-peri

TylerDurdon
06-06-17, 09:21 AM
Yes. When he got his cell phone and we paid for it, we insisted that he install a tracker app (we both use it to) so I can look online at any time and know where my family is. He's a teenager and he hates it but we said "if you want the high-end phone and data plan - you keep this on..." He regularly runs his phone out of battery and then turns off the location function to "save battery" but that's just his way of showing us that he can do it. It's hard but you need to make them understand that you are concerned with them and need to know where they are. It also helps when you don't have to call someone and ask then they'll be home - you can see how far away they are.

TylerDurdon
06-06-17, 09:25 AM
I also put a short range one in his wallet - which helped because he lost it and I ended up tracking it down in a McDonalds garbage can in our town the day before his SATs.