View Full Version : Anyone work in sales?


Kdawg1
06-05-17, 06:13 AM
I'm going to do a ride along with a sales associate this week and am very excited to check out a new department I have been with this company for 5 years and I am good at what I do and it pays a lot of money, but it's the night shift and I miss my kids and wife, and honestly its just boring,I feel like I was ment to do more. So how does ADD respond to outside sales? It sounds like hard work, but may be fun to interact with diffrent people, and build relationships. I can't seem to get the search link to work. What am I doing wrong?

Traveler5
06-06-17, 08:00 PM
I have done outside sales for over 10 years -- I was diagnosed with ADHD 5 years ago. I was in my most recent job for 8 years until I quit a month ago. You can make a lot of money in sales but you really have to be passionate about your company and the product/service you are selling. In my last job I was passionate for the first 6 years then I started losing my inner drive to do well -- I was getting burned-out and horribly bored with my job which I attribute to ADHD. This past year, under new sales management, was the worst. There was a lot of undue pressure put on me, micromanaging that wasn't there before, and unfairness to me in the compensation structure. I dealt with it for as long as I could then turned in my two-week notice that I was leaving.

Kdawg1
06-06-17, 10:19 PM
Thank you for responding, so today I did the ride along, It was very new and exciting. I really liked the interaction with the customer. As far as the numbers and profits side it really did not seem too hard to deal with, and the traning program is around 5 months. I would take about a 40 - 50k pay cut at first but I can afford that if it means more time with the fam. this would also be a good steping stone for other positions within the company. Maybe I would get bored in a few years but then I could go into another department. So you are still in sales?

sarahsweets
06-07-17, 05:58 AM
I was always good with certain types of retail sales and booking sales because i am very good with people and articulate. The problem was if I didnt believe in what I was selling or had to pressure people into a sale I didnt like it and was bad with it. I used to work at Victoria's Secret in college and loved (still wear) their underwear and bras. Very expensive but held up well. I was very good with the men that came in looking at stuff for their wives. I sucked at telemarketing and quit after two weeks. I worked as a reservationist with an airport transport service and did well there too.

VoxPopuli
06-10-17, 03:44 PM
I'm going to do a ride along with a sales associate this week and am very excited to check out a new department I have been with this company for 5 years and I am good at what I do and it pays a lot of money, but it's the night shift and I miss my kids and wife, and honestly its just boring,I feel like I was ment to do more.

For all the reasons you've mentioned, sounds like it's time for a change, but one where you can leverage the skills and relationships you've already built. That's a sounds like a "win"..to me. I followed a pretty similar path, for much the same reasons (mastering a current role, more time with family)...with ONE major exception: I made more money when I stepped out of a customer service role and into a sales trainee preparing to take on an outside sales role. Typically, your base salary does increase, even if you're going on some form of variable/incentive pay. I'd want to learn more about that.

It could be that I'm reading your post incorrectly? Maybe I assumed you were going from your current role, to the role in outside sales, within your current company?

So how does ADD respond to outside sales? It sounds like hard work, but may be fun to interact with diffrent people, and build relationships

It is hard work, but if you believe in the product, and yourself, then you'll likely do well. I never saw myself as the "salesman" stereotype. I thought that if I could help people looking for what my company made, then I would be more of a facilitator - and that I could do.

See, my theory is: we all sell THE most important product, to everyone IN our daily lives, every day. When you do it for a living, you need to know THAT you are selling, and you need to know WHY you are selling that product. What's the product? YOU.

Again, the WHY is for all the reasons you listed (travel, daily interaction with people, building relationships). I probably don't need to remind you that ADD folks have this innate ability to charm the living socks off of folks, honed by years of trying to make it thru life with half our brains tied behind our backs...

Everyone who responded has given you great advice regarding believing in the product. If you do that, you will automatically learn product features & benefits - but once you get your feet wet, learn the job and expectations - and you think it might be something you think you could turn into a career - do yourself a solid and get some training in consultative sales. It kind of takes the old saying "The customer is always right" to a new level. I now understand that the customer is always right, if I have the right customer.

If you enjoy being a resource of something people need - then you will likely do well in a sales career.

...and there's a BIG difference between a job and a career...

Now, you will need to be disciplined, because the career field is littered with the bodies of better educated, streamlined thinking folks...who couldn't handle the freedom of setting their own schedule, nor master an expense account enough to keep them from drinking their way into rehab...

Don't worry about the metrics, find something you love doing, that allows you the freedom to do it remotely (i.e., your way), and set your own schedule...the secret is finding the right customers. The right ones know they have a problem and know they need to do something about it, and have the money to pay for it.

If you do THAT.. budgets, forecasts, gaps-to-plans, actual-vs-plan...will all take care of themselves.

Good luck! Don't forget to tell us the decision you've made, and some semi-regular updates with how it's going!

Happy hunting!

VoxPopuli
06-10-17, 04:12 PM
I was always good with certain types of retail sales and booking sales because i am very good with people and articulate. The problem was if I didnt believe in what I was selling or had to pressure people into a sale I didnt like it and was bad with it. I used to work at Victoria's Secret in college and loved (still wear) their underwear and bras. Very expensive but held up well. I was very good with the men that came in looking at stuff for their wives. I sucked at telemarketing and quit after two weeks.

Great story! Touched on all the key points: your personal experience/personal use demonstrated your product knowledge to a potential customer (and us), but more importantly that you believed in the products you sold, this is critical to success in "up selling" the benefits of more expensive products. This is NOT easy to teach.

Anyone can "sell" by offering to reduce prices, but you define a career by being able to sell the benefits of expensive things.

That word "expensive" has a negative connotation - but quite frankly - expensive things look better, perform better, and last longer (which your post ALSO mentions). What isn't always appreciated is: typically expensive items allow for higher pay for employees making and selling these items. More than likely offer types of incentives, maybe even incentive/bonus pay. This attracts better clientele - but also a more professional staff of co-workers.

I worked as a reservationist with an airport transport service and did well there too.

Was this a remote job or was this in an office environment? Office environments are toxic for me. Too many "clock-watchers", and I'm not sure I could do well long-term even in a management role, if I had to spend a majority of my time in an office.

Kdawg1
06-19-17, 07:53 AM
For all the reasons you've mentioned, sounds like it's time for a change, but one where you can leverage the skills and relationships you've already built. That's a sounds like a "win"..to me. I followed a pretty similar path, for much the same reasons (mastering a current role, more time with family)...with ONE major exception: I made more money when I stepped out of a customer service role and into a sales trainee preparing to take on an outside sales role. Typically, your base salary does increase, even if you're going on some form of variable/incentive pay. I'd want to learn more about that.

It could be that I'm reading your post incorrectly? Maybe I assumed you were going from your current role, to the role in outside sales, within your current company?



It is hard work, but if you believe in the product, and yourself, then you'll likely do well. I never saw myself as the "salesman" stereotype. I thought that if I could help people looking for what my company made, then I would be more of a facilitator - and that I could do.

See, my theory is: we all sell THE most important product, to everyone IN our daily lives, every day. When you do it for a living, you need to know THAT you are selling, and you need to know WHY you are selling that product. What's the product? YOU.

Again, the WHY is for all the reasons you listed (travel, daily interaction with people, building relationships). I probably don't need to remind you that ADD folks have this innate ability to charm the living socks off of folks, honed by years of trying to make it thru life with half our brains tied behind our backs...

Everyone who responded has given you great advice regarding believing in the product. If you do that, you will automatically learn product features & benefits - but once you get your feet wet, learn the job and expectations - and you think it might be something you think you could turn into a career - do yourself a solid and get some training in consultative sales. It kind of takes the old saying "The customer is always right" to a new level. I now understand that the customer is always right, if I have the right customer.

If you enjoy being a resource of something people need - then you will likely do well in a sales career.

...and there's a BIG difference between a job and a career...

Now, you will need to be disciplined, because the career field is littered with the bodies of better educated, streamlined thinking folks...who couldn't handle the freedom of setting their own schedule, nor master an expense account enough to keep them from drinking their way into rehab...

Don't worry about the metrics, find something you love doing, that allows you the freedom to do it remotely (i.e., your way), and set your own schedule...the secret is finding the right customers. The right ones know they have a problem and know they need to do something about it, and have the money to pay for it.

If you do THAT.. budgets, forecasts, gaps-to-plans, actual-vs-plan...will all take care of themselves.

Good luck! Don't forget to tell us the decision you've made, and some semi-regular updates with how it's going!

Happy hunting!

Thank you for all of that information, yes this is my current company. I did apply for the sales job a week ago and still no word, it may be because I did not apply for the trainee position. My current job is not going so well now and I may just take the summer off if I don't hear back in a week or so. I'm sick of this union job

Snoopy10
07-08-17, 11:27 AM
I think sales would be good for someone with ADHD because you get to move from short task to short task. In my opinion "closing" deals could be tough but if you make it a game, that could help.