View Full Version : What skills do you believe employers want ?


userguide
06-05-17, 09:45 AM
I wonder if people here maybe have so low self esteem, that they really are unemployable.

So what do you think your potential employer would want from you ?

aeon
06-05-17, 09:49 AM
So what do you think your potential employer would want from you ?

Easy.

They want you to be able to get along well with coworkers.

Second, they want you to be able to do something they need in service of their goal, most often being making a profit.

So behaviors which serve the customer and enhance the value of the company, good.

Behaviors which cost the company money, bad.

Simple as that.


Cheers,
Ian

Little Missy
06-05-17, 09:57 AM
oooh! Me! Me!

Reliability, always early or on time, take the initiative and a gorgeous smile. :D

userguide
06-05-17, 09:58 AM
They want you to be able to get along well with coworkers.

- I think that's very idealistic :D

Little Missy
06-05-17, 09:59 AM
They want you to be able to get along well with coworkers.

- I think that's very idealistic :D

Not at all.

userguide
06-05-17, 10:03 AM
What if internal competition is the dream of the management ? :)
Or getting everyone uberized ;)

Little Missy
06-05-17, 10:07 AM
What if internal competition is the dream of the management ? :)
Or getting everyone uberized ;)

Not my problem, I'm not competitive. Uberized is their problem, not mine. I have no subscription to that.

sarahsweets
06-05-17, 10:31 AM
They want you to be able to get along well with coworkers.

- I think that's very idealistic :D

In would say this is one of the most important things employers look for, team players are the ones who keep the company flowing.

aeon
06-05-17, 10:38 AM
I think that's very idealistic :D

Depending on the company in question, maybe.

That said, I love my coworkers, and that is not an exaggeration.

Iíve been invited to Thanksgiving dinner when I had no family of my own to go to.

I have driven them home when they were not fit to drive.

I have cooked for them, and I have eaten food they prepared for all of us.

Right now, as my car is unwell, a coworker has loaned me his truck, then his car, no questions asked, just fill it with gas.

We have grilled together, drank together, sang songs together.

I get to share in the joy of their children.

I tease them and joke with them, and they tease me and joke with me.

Sometimes someone has had some hard circumstance, and we listen and remind them they are loved.

We go to see a guyís band. We make sure a kidís fundraiser goes supported.

Iíve been to a graduation, and I have been to a funeral.

Iíve laughed the deepest laughs with them, and I have cried with them, for reasons of my own, or in a time when they had reasons to cry.

Back when I was part-time and work was very slow, a full-time coworker of mine voluntarily gave up hours so I would have a chance to work.

We support one another.

These are the best people I have ever worked with, and this is the best work culture I have ever experienced.
We know each othersí hopes, and we know what each of us struggles with, is challenged with.
And we respect those things, and never use that to advantage.

Well, Iíve wrote this out and now I am in tears at the front desk again.

And you know what? Because of my coworkers, thatís OK.
And if they asked why, I could tell them I was writing about how great they all are and what they mean to me, and what that means to me.
And that would be OK too.

We talk about how much that all means...and it means a lot.
You canít put a price on it, and we donít, but we know we are rich in a way that could never be bought or sold.

So to J. and D. and T. and D. and L. and J. and S. and D. and N. and D. and J. and G. and J. and J. and G. and P. and J. and B. and D.ÖI love you all.

And Edd, may you rest in peace, my friend. :yes:


I Am Blessťd,
Ian

Fuzzy12
06-05-17, 10:39 AM
Second, they want you to be able to do something they need in service of their goal, most often being making a profit.

So behaviors which serve the customer and enhance the value of the company, good

Simple as that.


Cheers,
Ian

This is key but what this means in practice isn't simple at all. And convincing s potential.employer that you have something of value to add is even more difficult.

aeon
06-05-17, 10:58 AM
This is key but what this means in practice isn't simple at all. And convincing s potential.employer that you have something of value to add is even more difficult.

True, and truer still.

Yes, the concept is simple.

Putting it into practice...well, thatís why they call it work.


Cheers,
Ian

stef
06-05-17, 11:00 AM
What if internal competition is the dream of the management ? :)


Many years ago now I worked for a small company that actually preferred keeping everyone "downtrodden";
My direct boss, who was so very nice and professional, was not allowed to "mingle" with the staff;
They tried to "divide and conquer" the 2 girls in accounting (this did not work, they were on to it);
Let 2 of the translators fight bitterly over jobs (we were paid per word translated), instead of stepping in and assigning fairly;
in the meantime, the lovely receptionist was pretty much running the whole company and got zero recognition, training, promotion, etc.

This made absolutely no sense, everyone would have been SO much more productive without all of our energy going into the conflict and bitterness.

peripatetic
06-05-17, 11:16 AM
i'm assuming this is a reaction to fuzzy's thread about academia.

what people want in academia and what they want in the corporate world are likely very different, but there might be similar themes.

e.g. what aeon said about adding value...what missy noted about reliability.

what "adding value" means in academia is that you're well published or can generate research grants. it's less about student interaction than you'd like to think.

it IS, however, about interaction with colleagues. what you bring to the institution matters and most of the time if you can't be counted on to do the extra work, like reading applications for admissions, teaching the bigger courses (intros, for example), and other things that are just unpleasant, like helping orchestrate conferences...then you need to be exceptional with publications. all of the above happen to the detriment of actually teaching students because staying atop one's field and teaching students are simply at odd most of the time. sadly, you can be good at either thing, or even both, and still not be great with the things a corporation would be interested in.

Cyllya
06-10-17, 05:50 PM
Oh, the obnoxious employment system...

Besides the skills specific to the tasks you'll do, they usually have other requirements, including so-called "soft skills" which are useful in a variety of jobs and hard to train people on. Look around any employment/career resources, they do interviews of hiring managers and HR people, there is a fair consensus of what kind of "soft skills" are desired. Here is a typical list, copied and paraphrased from a slideshow on the career section of the Reader's Digest website:

able to get where people are coming from (being perceptive and understanding of others' motives)
relatable (able to work on a team; coworkers find you open, available, empathetic)
good on your own (have initiative, able to work independently)
curious (ask questions, confirm the accuracy of your understanding)
people look to you (leadership skills, motivate others, provide positive feedback to encourage others)
can be counted on (work ethic, do what you're supposed to do when you're supposed to do it)
good listener, and good at conflict resolution
decisive (assured of your ability to make solid decisions, or having the knowledge to make decisions appropriately)
level-headed (keep your emotions in check professionally)
grace under pressure (not too stressed)
time management and organization skills (so you don't miss deadlines)
flexible and adaptable, don't get stuck in one way of doing things
get along with others (social skills, not being a jerk)
able to express yourself well (good communication skills, both verbal and written, have enough confidence in yourself and your ideas that it doesn't impair your communication abilities)
want to grow (admitting mistakes, always looking for ways to improve)
persistence (a positive outlook)
problem-solving skills, strategic thinking


It's a fairly typical list.

Even if you have those skills, it can be a bit hard to show or prove.

But hiring managers are human, and sometimes they aren't very bright humans, and they often have nothing to do with the tasks the potential employee would be doing, so what employers want and what employers will hire aren't necessarily the same.

Employers often want punctuality, even if a strict schedule isn't legitimately required for the nature of the job, even if they have an automated time-keeping system. (I think it's because they extrapolate punctuality to overall professionalism, responsibility, etc. So someone who can't show up at work on a consistent time due to executive functioning issues is fairly disadvantaged.

Due to the current status of cannabis under USA federal law, it is legal and common for companies to discriminate against applicants/employees who use it (https://www.printfriendly.com/print?source=homepage&url_s=uGGCF_%7E_PdN_%7E_PcS_%7E_PcSJJJmJnFuvAtGBAC BFGmpBz_%7E_PcSArJF_%7E_PcSJBAx_%7E_PcSJC_%7E_PcSc abh_%7E_PcSaf_%7E_PcSbh_%7E_PcSpBzCnAvrF-Arrq-JBExrEF-oHG-CrBCyr-xrrC-trGGvAt-uvtu_%7E_PcS_%7E_PdSHGz_GrEz_%7E_PdQmerhbsfigpnda) , even in a state where it's legalized, even if the person has a prescription. They'll use "safety" as an excuse, even if they're using a type of drug test that detects use of cannabis three months ago.

They want you to be "interest" in the job, which is understandable to some degree, but they have weird superstitions about how to detect "interest" or lack thereof, which can thwart applicants who have different body language than expected due to neurodevelopmental quirks or because they're from a different region than the interviewer. Recently, my boss wanted to hire another person to work the same job as me, and one of his requirements was that the person ask questions about the position during the interview.

Even for "soft skills," requirements and expectations differ by the nature of job too. I was raised in a lower-middle-class loser family, but in school, my academic skills got me sorted into the classes with the kids who were on a college-oriented professional track. I went to college because I didn't realize I had an option not to. I got training in college about how to get a job. I'm reading-inclined and frugality-inclined, so I'd read financial advice, which often included career advice. All this told me you should have a resume, show up to the interview early, dress nicely at the interview even if the normal business attire at the company is more casual, keep in mind the employer's needs and emphasize what advantages you have over other candidates, and have an explanation for anything interviewers tend to frown on (such as employment gaps, or your last job was quite different than the one you're currently applying for). When I had trouble getting or keeping more professional jobs, I tried supposedly "low skill" jobs. Partway through my turn at a group interview for a smoothie shop, the manager looked at me like I was an idiot and asked, "What kind of job do you think this is?" Apparently the procedure is different for those kinds of jobs. Still don't know what it is.

WheresMyMind
06-12-17, 02:42 AM
oooh! Me! Me!

Reliability, always early or on time, take the initiative and a gorgeous smile. :D

Speaking as an employer, I would say none of the above is my #1.

#1: The eager desire to thrill customers so much that they come back begging for more.

Depending on the job and the customer, this may require reliability, usually means taking the initiative, and almost never has anything to do with smiling or being "early or on time" to work. If you email a customer the solution to his problem on your off-time, that's better than showing up at the office on time.

But, as I said - depends 200% on the job.

wmm

Little Missy
06-12-17, 07:11 AM
Speaking as an employer, I would say none of the above is my #1.

#1: The eager desire to thrill customers so much that they come back begging for more.

Depending on the job and the customer, this may require reliability, usually means taking the initiative, and almost never has anything to do with smiling or being "early or on time" to work. If you email a customer the solution to his problem on your off-time, that's better than showing up at the office on time.

But, as I said - depends 200% on the job.

wmm


:lol: