View Full Version : Meditation for ADD related anxiety?


Funky1
06-06-17, 05:31 PM
I somewhat new to the world of meditation, but I suffer from some pretty wicked relationship anxiety issues and I'd really like to try to see if mediation might help me. I am aware of what my ADD does to my brain, and that 90% of my chronic worrying is in my head and completely baseless, but I still have trouble quieting my racing mind and that's where I'm hoping meditation may help me a lot. Any suggestions? Places to go, people to talk to, sites to visit? For the record, I am on meds but still don't feel like I've found the answer there yet, and I'm in the middle of yet another career switch and as a result I'll be uninsured for a short time so I can't address that right this moment.

someothertime
06-06-17, 08:38 PM
relate...

considering anxiety meds myself finally....

my only other options are 1 hr + exercise a day....

yes meditation can help too....

Unmanagable
06-06-17, 10:26 PM
Some names I recall when I was first learning various meditation practices are Pema Chodron, Mooji, Teal Swan, and David Ji.

Not specifically for the technique aspect itself as much as for their overall mindful wisdom and awareness that lead to an easier go at the whole meditation scene.

I attended local workshops and stuff when I happened upon them, most being free or donation/volunteer based.

Found a lot of helpful techniques via some folks I met through free community drum circles, too. Rhythm and sound are incredibly meditative for me.

I facilitated a weekly diaphragmatic breathing meditation for a while after learning how effective it was for me in helping with anxiety.

A local shop owner had a community room open for use and it really helped me to keep on track and remain accountable, helping it to actually become a practice vs. my usual half-a** trying every once in a while and deciding it was a failure.

That helped give me more confidence in what I was practicing when I was actively receiving feedback from others who were also benefiting.

Sitting still and meditating was the toughest one to harness, and made me think I couldn't "get it" for the longest time because it just didn't feel right. Learning that the goal is not to have a totally quiet mind was another helpful tidbit I had misunderstood for quite a while.

I prefer things like walking, hula hooping, dancing, gardening, crafting, writing, singing, wild foraging, wild crafting, food prep, lending a hand, coloring, drumming, playing the Native American flute, etc., etc. Meditation in motion.

I reserve the quiet still meditation time for bath time, first thing in the morning before getting out of bed, meal time, and last thing before going to sleep. Nature time can be very still some days, too, depending on the flow of the day.

Sitting by the fire pit, by the mountain stream, in the morning sun, near the lilac bush, the honeysuckle, etc. So may ways to do it. Make it your own as it best enriches your life and enjoy.

Meditation is only one small piece of my wellness/symptom management (not only for adhd) puzzle, though. It takes a village.

AashiAggarwal
07-24-17, 10:42 PM
Here are some meditation techniques that can be used to get rid of anxiety:

Zen meditation: This type of meditation improves posture, visualization, and breathing. Individuals generally sit or kneel in a Buddha-like position and breathe smoothly, which slows down the mind and helps encourage good feelings.
Mindfulness meditation: this form of meditation is helpful in controlling negative emotions, anxiety, depression, and chronic pain.
Mantra-based meditation: this form of meditation is helpful in pacifying your emotions and making your life stress free. Practice this meditation technique a few times a day (Urban Buddha).

someothertime
07-25-17, 09:18 PM
I facilitated a weekly diaphragmatic breathing meditation for a while after learning how effective it was for me in helping with anxiety.

A local shop owner had a community room open for use and it really helped me to keep on track and remain accountable, helping it to actually become a practice vs. my usual half-a** trying every once in a while and deciding it was a failure.





Wanted to restate this element, and just how critical / facilitating it can be for us ADDers. So for anyone seeking efficient application..... try to remember what Unmanageable mentioned here about external constructs/formatting away from your norm and just how powerful a tool that can be in learning / change / persistence / application / focus and consistency. ( thanks the universe for that shop owner :) )

It's amazing when I put things i've "tried" in the context above...... just how much of what was "unsuccessful" was really down to what "format" I actually applied myself.....

Thanks again for sharing your experience.