View Full Version : sometimes I wonder why I'm "ADHD"...


baical
06-15-17, 04:17 AM
I've seen people act hyper/active at universities especially during their get-together nights and "party nights" yet those are mostly kids that are undersexed therefore they have the need to "act it out" (histrionic personality disorder) to take out their sexually motivated aggression (i.e. hypersexual disorder). I would think it's a form of attentive (attention seeking) ADHD co-morbid with psychopathic personality disorder with a hint of impulse control disorder.

You should hear the types of conversations they talk about and their intonation...sometimes I think humans are worse than animals!

It's hard for me to believe these kids are actually graduating with narcissistic accolades. Maybe narcissism is the formula to success? Perhaps the professors are as drunk as the kids and both sides are feeding off each other's energies. If teachers fail these kids, it looks like as if the teachers weren't good teachers. It would look bad on the school. Everything is for profit. It's all a form of "exchange". Students pay the big bucks, the school better provide the "key" to the corporate world (aka the diploma). Looks good on both sides.

sarahsweets
06-15-17, 04:54 AM
I dont think I understand.....



I've seen people act hyper/active at universities especially during their get-together nights and "party nights" yet those are mostly kids that are undersexed therefore they have the need to "act it out" (histrionic personality disorder) to take out their sexually motivated aggression (i.e. hypersexual disorder).
How do you know what anyone's sex life is like? And to say they are undersexed and need to act out on it seems like a stretch to me."acting out on it" is not the same thing as someone with histrionic PD and I think its offensive to suggest that it is. And to suggest that a personality disorder is results in sexual aggression isnt cool either.

I would think it's a form of attentive (attention seeking) ADHD co-morbid with psychopathic personality disorder with a hint of impulse control disorder.
Do you even understand what you are saying? You are making sweeping generalizations about real, painful PD's and relating them to attention seeking.

You should hear the types of conversations they talk about and their intonation...sometimes I think humans are worse than animals!
I do not even understand what you mean by this.

It's hard for me to believe these kids are actually graduating with narcissistic accolades. Maybe narcissism is the formula to success? Perhaps the professors are as drunk as the kids and both sides are feeding off each other's energies. If teachers fail these kids, it looks like as if the teachers weren't good teachers. It would look bad on the school.Again, generalizations, judgements and a lack of understanding is evident here.

Everything is for profit. It's all a form of "exchange". Students pay the big bucks, the school better provide the "key" to the corporate world (aka the diploma). Looks good on both sides.Education is not always about the almighty dollar and about getting ahead in the corporate world. And kudos to whoever can graduate with honors and have adhd.

Pilgrim
06-15-17, 12:14 PM
Can't remember what you do. This, I think , is a cultural issue.

Don't think this attitude helps the young.

Johnny Slick
06-15-17, 03:59 PM
I'm completely lost. There isn't a flavor of ADHD that's "attention seeking". People with ADHD can be attention seekers for sure, and you can even make a case that the attention seeking behavior grows out of the ADHD (I could come up with a couple different ways) but that doesn't make it attention seeking ADHD. Histrionic Personality Disorder is, as the name suggests, a personality disorder whereas ADHD is, so far as anyone can tell, an issue with brain chemistry. They're just plain not the same thing.

One thing I would say in general is that in my experience those of us with ADHD do tend to be a bit narcissistic. I don't mean we have full on NPD or anything like that but a lot of us have spent so much time worrying about fixing our own faults that we begin to become a bit inward-facing and have a tendency to take stuff that's happening around us and has nothing at all to do with us personally. I'm wondering if that's what's happening here. At the end of the day, these kids in college... does it really *matter* to how you live your life how they talk, or how they manage to get good enough grades to pass? Some people just find stuff easier to do than other people, and what's more - and as a person who suffers from ADHD, this might be a thing you may want to pay closer attention to in others, because I know we do it *all* the time - a lot of people can act like everything's going smoothly and they don't care when in fact when they're at home or whatever they care deeply and are working their butts off. Just because you don't like the particular tone a person takes does not make that person stupid or lazy or constantly drunk.

(Also, I went to 4 year college relatively late in life - 29 when I got my degree - and it was not my experience that the professors were "drunk" at work at *all*. No, my experience was that the vast majority of them loved what they did and could talk about their subject matter for hours. If they were "drunk" with anything, it was passion for the stuff they were teaching.)

ginniebean
06-15-17, 06:43 PM
I've seen people act hyper/active at universities especially during their get-together nights and "party nights" yet those are mostly kids that are undersexed therefore they have the need to "act it out" (histrionic personality disorder) to take out their sexually motivated aggression (i.e. hypersexual disorder). I would think it's a form of attentive (attention seeking) ADHD co-morbid with psychopathic personality disorder with a hint of impulse control disorder.

You should hear the types of conversations they talk about and their intonation...sometimes I think humans are worse than animals!

It's hard for me to believe these kids are actually graduating with narcissistic accolades. Maybe narcissism is the formula to success? Perhaps the professors are as drunk as the kids and both sides are feeding off each other's energies. If teachers fail these kids, it looks like as if the teachers weren't good teachers. It would look bad on the school. Everything is for profit. It's all a form of "exchange". Students pay the big bucks, the school better provide the "key" to the corporate world (aka the diploma). Looks good on both sides.


HOLY CRAP, judge much??

THIS IS NOT AN ADHD PROBLEM. This is some weird messed up stuff sorry to say.

dvdnvwls
06-15-17, 07:13 PM
I am very very confused by the original post in this thread. Has it been edited by mistake?

[Mod note: yes, original post was combined with a reply by accident -- oops! -- but the original version has now been restored. - Namazu]

dvdnvwls
06-15-17, 07:25 PM
baical:

Kids do the things they do. That fact has nothing to do with any of the disorders you've mentioned.

Disorders are also not related to every action that has a similar name. If I get anxious, that doesn't mean I have an anxiety disorder. If I act in a histrionic way, that doesn't mean I have histrionic personality disorder. And so on. It isn't that simple. Not even close.

Lunacie
06-15-17, 08:01 PM
Baical, do you have a PHD in psychiatry/psycology? I'm guessing not since your
post indicates that you're still in school.

Did you know that PHDs who have experience diagnosing mental disorders
Do Not diagnose one person, let alone a whole group of people, based on
overheard discussions at parties. It takes some serious discussion, generally
one-on-one with doctor and patient over some time.

Just thought you'd already caught enough flak over your post, thought I'd
explain what the problem with your comments is.


As far as the last part of your post, I'd agree with that based on stories in
the news in the last few years concerning some students with green
(money) privilege either get away with or get at most a slap on the wrist.
(re Brock Turner)

TheGreatKing
09-10-17, 06:30 PM
I've seen people act hyper/active at universities especially during their get-together nights and "party nights" yet those are mostly kids that are undersexed therefore they have the need to "act it out" (histrionic personality disorder) to take out their sexually motivated aggression (i.e. hypersexual disorder). I would think it's a form of attentive (attention seeking) ADHD co-morbid with psychopathic personality disorder with a hint of impulse control disorder.

You should hear the types of conversations they talk about and their intonation...sometimes I think humans are worse than animals!

It's hard for me to believe these kids are actually graduating with narcissistic accolades. Maybe narcissism is the formula to success? Perhaps the professors are as drunk as the kids and both sides are feeding off each other's energies. If teachers fail these kids, it looks like as if the teachers weren't good teachers. It would look bad on the school. Everything is for profit. It's all a form of "exchange". Students pay the big bucks, the school better provide the "key" to the corporate world (aka the diploma). Looks good on both sides.

am i missing something here........i am so confused.

baical
10-25-17, 03:29 PM
You can't see what I see. Oh well!

baical:

Kids do the things they do. That fact has nothing to do with any of the disorders you've mentioned.

Disorders are also not related to every action that has a similar name. If I get anxious, that doesn't mean I have an anxiety disorder. If I act in a histrionic way, that doesn't mean I have histrionic personality disorder. And so on. It isn't that simple. Not even close.

baical
10-25-17, 03:38 PM
You're mistaking "overheard" for observations.

You get me? My experiences and observations are clearly different than yours. I get it. I guess I'm not part of this thread's "clique" :giggle: Or maybe my post was personal that people pretend it's a hoax? The same reason why people become uneasy and mum when it comes to talk about race. Instead of just saying "I don't really get what you're trying to say" or "what are you talking about", try to pay ATTENTION to what I just wrote. There's a legitimate reason why people act the way they do and do the things they do. You don't need a PHD to learn emotional intelligence. There's a reason why people like country and not hip hop and vice versa (both are music genres but it's far from "just music"). There's a reason why people prefer UFC over boxing or nascar vs. horse racing.

They don't get me, you don't get me. Why not dig deeper and step outside the box and do some serious observations?

Baical, do you have a PHD in psychiatry/psycology? I'm guessing not since your
post indicates that you're still in school.

Did you know that PHDs who have experience diagnosing mental disorders
Do Not diagnose one person, let alone a whole group of people, based on
overheard discussions at parties. It takes some serious discussion, generally
one-on-one with doctor and patient over some time.

Just thought you'd already caught enough flak over your post, thought I'd
explain what the problem with your comments is.


As far as the last part of your post, I'd agree with that based on stories in
the news in the last few years concerning some students with green
(money) privilege either get away with or get at most a slap on the wrist.
(re Brock Turner)

Little Missy
10-25-17, 03:53 PM
You're mistaking "overheard" for observations.

You get me? My experiences and observations are clearly different than yours. I get it. I guess I'm not part of this thread's "clique" :giggle: Or maybe my post was personal that people pretend it's a hoax? The same reason why people become uneasy and mum when it comes to talk about race. Instead of just saying "I don't really get what you're trying to say" or "what are you talking about", try to pay ATTENTION to what I just wrote. There's a legitimate reason why people act the way they do and do the things they do. You don't need a PHD to learn emotional intelligence. There's a reason why people like country and not hip hop and vice versa (both are music genres but it's far from "just music"). There's a reason why people prefer UFC over boxing or nascar vs. horse racing.

They don't get me, you don't get me. Why not dig deeper and step outside the box and do some serious observations?

Those are all blanket statements that YOU believe in.

baical
10-25-17, 04:07 PM
I hope I can make you understand;

Here goes: the title of the thread is meant to be a hyperbole!

Considering it is in the "Personality Disorder" thread. I meant to speak of that disorder, not so much ADHD itself. Just upon observations of people and their behaviour, one with enough common sense can figure out what could possible be wrong with them. Ex: if one walks around with a limp, does it mean the person has polio? It's possible. But if you did some serious observation and realized the person was actually an athlete in school, THEN you could imply the person must have sprained his ankle? Right?

Regarding second hand conversations; some cold cases have been solved just by "I've heard these people talk about something" etc. Tone and facial expression changes the meaning of what's being said. I'll give you an example; if I said "Hi" to you in a mild mannered way with a smile, it may come across pleasant. If I said "Hi!" with a grin and a sarcastic tone, would you GET why that is or you'll wait to find out what prank is about to be pulled on you?

You need to read more on psychopathic and or sociopathic traits when it comes to narcissism. It is formula to success for some. Again, my experiences are different than yours but there are lots of stories out there regarding teachers changing grades just to make their quota look "clean".

If you like to disagree just because you have nothing else better to say other than "I don't get it", you're entitled to your opinion. I'm not here to make you "get it". If you don't get it, you're never going to get it.

I dont think I understand.....




How do you know what anyone's sex life is like? And to say they are undersexed and need to act out on it seems like a stretch to me."acting out on it" is not the same thing as someone with histrionic PD and I think its offensive to suggest that it is. And to suggest that a personality disorder is results in sexual aggression isnt cool either.

Do you even understand what you are saying? You are making sweeping generalizations about real, painful PD's and relating them to attention seeking.

I do not even understand what you mean by this.

Again, generalizations, judgements and a lack of understanding is evident here.

Education is not always about the almighty dollar and about getting ahead in the corporate world. And kudos to whoever can graduate with honors and have adhd.

baical
10-25-17, 04:08 PM
In what way?
Those are all blanket statements that YOU believe in.

Lunacie
10-25-17, 04:09 PM
You're mistaking "overheard" for observations.

You get me? My experiences and observations are clearly different than yours. I get it. I guess I'm not part of this thread's "clique" :giggle: Or maybe my post was personal that people pretend it's a hoax? The same reason why people become uneasy and mum when it comes to talk about race. Instead of just saying "I don't really get what you're trying to say" or "what are you talking about", try to pay ATTENTION to what I just wrote. There's a legitimate reason why people act the way they do and do the things they do. You don't need a PHD to learn emotional intelligence. There's a reason why people like country and not hip hop and vice versa (both are music genres but it's far from "just music"). There's a reason why people prefer UFC over boxing or nascar vs. horse racing.

They don't get me, you don't get me. Why not dig deeper and step outside the box and do some serious observations?

Yes, clearly we do have different observations.

I had this discussion a few days ago with a mother on an autism forum who
said that it seems everyone has anxiety disorder these days.

Um ... no. They don't. Everyone has anxiety now and then, but when it's
unrelenting and lasts for weeks or months AND it impairs your ability to
live your life well, then it may be diagnosed as a disorder. Only about 1 in
20 people experience that kind of anxiety.

But you shouldn't assume that every person who gets a little anxious about
their latest test grade or getting a promotion at work has anxiety disorder.

And you shouldn't assume that every college kid who is experiencing life
on their own with new freedom and new choices has a form of " ADHD co-
morbid with psychopathic personality disorder with a hint of impulse control
disorder."

I think what most of here are trying to say is what I told that mom on the
other forum ... it devalues our personal experiences with diagnosed disorders
when you assume that everyone at a party suffers from the same issues that
we do.

peripatetic
10-25-17, 04:15 PM
thread closed for review.

cheers,
-peri

Fortune
10-25-17, 09:37 PM
Thread reopened.

Fortune
10-25-17, 09:42 PM
And re the thread's topic, I think anyone who is out there armchair diagnosing people with personality disorders, especially based on brief encounters, needs to seriously rethink their approach to interpersonal interactions, because there is no way your assessment can possibly be accurate. You can't just say "this person is sexual, thus hypersexual (first wrong assessment), thus histrionic (second even more wrong assessment)."

If you were a psychiatrist or psychologist this would be hugely unethical. Not that not being either makes it ethical, just that you'd be violating all kinds of professional standards.

Fraser_0762
10-25-17, 09:47 PM
If you were a psychiatrist or psychologist this would be hugely unethical. Not that not being either makes it ethical, just that you'd be violating all kinds of professional standards.

Perhaps. But psychiatrists and psychologists are also individuals who approach what is considered "fact" in the medical field from their own angle. Two different "professionals" in the same field can judge the exact same person differently.

Lunacie
10-25-17, 10:36 PM
I hope I can make you understand;

Here goes: the title of the thread is meant to be a hyperbole!


Perhaps this was obvious to other readers, but I am clueless as to how one
was supposed to understand that you meant your post as hyperbole.

Do you mean you don't really wonder why you've been diagnosed with adhd?


Considering it is in the "Personality Disorder" thread. I meant to speak of that disorder, not so much ADHD itself. Just upon observations of people and their behaviour, one with enough common sense can figure out what could possible be wrong with them. Ex: if one walks around with a limp, does it mean the person has polio? It's possible. But if you did some serious observation and realized the person was actually an athlete in school, THEN you could imply the person must have sprained his ankle? Right?


It seems that you left some information out of your original post about when
and where you had given these students some serious observation and not
just overheard them talking at a party.

It appears you're upset that those of us who responded didn't understand
either of these two points. Perhaps the problem was not in our inability to
comprehend, but in your ability to communicate.

Fortune
10-26-17, 03:01 PM
Perhaps. But psychiatrists and psychologists are also individuals who approach what is considered "fact" in the medical field from their own angle. Two different "professionals" in the same field can judge the exact same person differently.

This is true but it doesn't actually contradict or rebut what I said. If anything, it reinforces it.

baical
12-02-17, 05:05 PM
I guess what you're saying is I must have a PHD in psychiatry to get in one's head? Not careful observation or analyzing one's behavior? If you had enough emotional intelligence then you could easily know what someone is feeling or going through (empathy). Not many people have this...

I'm assuming not many on this thread have looked deeper into personality disorders, but more like psychiatric disorders since it's well studied.

Look into it please! Also, not everyone has to be a mathematician to know math! I can count money just fine!

What are the types of emotional intelligence?

Understanding the Five Categories of Emotional Intelligence (EQ)

Self-awareness. The ability to recognize an emotion as it “happens” is the key to your EQ. ... (take note: "as it happens", I can easily pick up on it as it happens! I'm not here to explain or prove anyone or my self wrong).

Self-regulation. You often have little control over when you experience emotions. ...

Motivation. ...

Empathy. ...

Social skills.

And re the thread's topic, I think anyone who is out there armchair diagnosing people with personality disorders, especially based on brief encounters, needs to seriously rethink their approach to interpersonal interactions, because there is no way your assessment can possibly be accurate. You can't just say "this person is sexual, thus hypersexual (first wrong assessment), thus histrionic (second even more wrong assessment)."

If you were a psychiatrist or psychologist this would be hugely unethical. Not that not being either makes it ethical, just that you'd be violating all kinds of professional standards.

baical
12-02-17, 05:10 PM
If you can't pick up on it in "brief", you're out of luck! :giggle:

What determines "accuracy", if you were to agree with me? If the people I've encountered "briefly" agreed with me?

If I were a psychiatrist, I'd just be following what's "ethical" in accordance to the DSM to make everyone happy...

Capiche?

And re the thread's topic, I think anyone who is out there armchair diagnosing people with personality disorders, especially based on brief encounters, needs to seriously rethink their approach to interpersonal interactions, because there is no way your assessment can possibly be accurate. You can't just say "this person is sexual, thus hypersexual (first wrong assessment), thus histrionic (second even more wrong assessment)."

If you were a psychiatrist or psychologist this would be hugely unethical. Not that not being either makes it ethical, just that you'd be violating all kinds of professional standards.

baical
12-02-17, 05:19 PM
Their current "facts" are only facts due to what's considered approved and or "ethical" in the eyes of the American Psychiatric Association and or what's already in the DSM.

If one is to get DEEPER into this, there are controversial mental and personality disorders out there.

How many mental disorders are listed in the DSM 5?

The DSM-I, from 1952, listed 106; the DSM-III, from 1980, listed 265, and the current DSM-IV has 297. (Complaints about this ever-increasing total led the chair of the DSM-5 task force, David Kupfer, to announce that the total number of disorders in DSM-5 will not increase. Apr 12, 2013

Perhaps. But psychiatrists and psychologists are also individuals who approach what is considered "fact" in the medical field from their own angle. Two different "professionals" in the same field can judge the exact same person differently.

Lunacie
12-02-17, 08:06 PM
Considering it is in the "Personality Disorder" thread. I meant to speak of that disorder, not so much ADHD itself. Just upon observations of people and their behaviour, one with enough common sense can figure out what could possible be wrong with them. Ex: if one walks around with a limp, does it mean the person has polio? It's possible. But if you did some serious observation and realized the person was actually an athlete in school, THEN you could imply the person must have sprained his ankle? Right?

.

What about other injuries relating to sports? Torn meniscus? Groin pull?
Hamstring strain? Shin splints?

Unless you are a medical professional you are just making a random guess.

A medical professional begins by asking questions such as "where does it
hurt?" and "what were you doing when it began to hurt?" They don't just
guess that it's the ankle that's been hurt just because the person plays
sports. They could be treating the wrong problem entirely.

Little Missy
12-02-17, 09:35 PM
A pebble in your shoe can really make you limp.

aeon
12-02-17, 09:40 PM
baical, I've read the DSM-IV and DSM-5 back to front a few times each...especially enjoying the entries for the various psychopathologies.

Do you know what and who I am then qualified to diagnose?

Nothing and no one.


Cheers,
Ian