View Full Version : Can I pursue this career anymore?


MindBlind
06-16-17, 12:49 PM
I'm not entirely sure where to start. I've always wanted to work in the creative industry and I have pushed myself through uni and fought really hard to hold down jobs. I did manage to get my degree but my employment history has been spotty. More recently, this was due to burning out from my last job (a clerical job that I hated) he I developed major depression and became unemployed for over a year.

Lately I've been trying to crawl my way back up, looking for jobs, maintaining my health and preparing for a masters. Thing is that I'm struggling to maintain structure even though my life is not really that demanding at this point. It makes me concerned about whether I can actually keep up with the industry even if I do finally manage to break in proper.

The literature on ADHD talks about reducing stress and having more downtime to overcome emotional dysregulation but what happens when you are expected to work long hours? What happens when you don't have proper job security? What happens if the only thing you're really good at also happens to be one of the most stressful and unpredictable careers one could have?

Self employment isn't the best solution either as that often means you have to work longer and smarter because you are relying on clients to get a paycheck and you might have no clients for months at a time. That takes a lot of initiative and structure to pull that off, which is a hefty task even for neurotypicals.

Should I just accept that I can't do as much as other people and try to see if working part time is feasible? I feel like I have exhausted pretty much all of my
other options and maybe the best I can do right now is less. Or is that not possible? I'm just frustrated that the creative industry doesn't discuss mental health and working conditions that often. In fact a lot of employers are **** with this. I feel pretty stranded, here.

dvdnvwls
06-16-17, 01:08 PM
A few ideas - they're a bit random - take them for what they're worth.

There is good stress and bad stress. Good stress is tough but exhilarating, and often it's simply the nature of certain kinds of work to be stressful. Good stress is not the problem.

Bad stress knocks you down and then kicks you while you're trying to get up. It often comes from unreasonable demands set up by other people.

With ADHD, it's best to find some way to end up in work that uses the maximum amount of your abilities while making the minimum demands on your disabilities. In fact that's true for absolutely everyone, but it's a more pressing issue for ADHD because most jobs assume you will have an average person's disabilities - and you don't.

MindBlind
07-21-17, 02:47 PM
A few ideas - they're a bit random - take them for what they're worth.

There is good stress and bad stress. Good stress is tough but exhilarating, and often it's simply the nature of certain kinds of work to be stressful. Good stress is not the problem.

Bad stress knocks you down and then kicks you while you're trying to get up. It often comes from unreasonable demands set up by other people.

With ADHD, it's best to find some way to end up in work that uses the maximum amount of your abilities while making the minimum demands on your disabilities. In fact that's true for absolutely everyone, but it's a more pressing issue for ADHD because most jobs assume you will have an average person's disabilities - and you don't.

Sometimes I wonder if the average person can even manage the creative industry these days. In fact, I think I might address working conditions as a subject for my masters dissertation. At least two of of my peers had severe repetitive strain injury in their dominant hands because they were drawing so much and I myself had sciatica flare ups for being a dumb butt and not stretching enough.

I agree - I like to have the good kind of stress. It makes things more interesting and reduces complacency. I struggle to harness that good stress or turn the bad stress into better stress. I try to create my own rewards system i.e, "if I get this work done by 6pm, I can binge watch Netflix for the rest of the night". It's an okay incentive, though often meaningless if I can easily access it anyway. Honestly, I need to get better at delayed gratification.

I worry that if I can't offer the same level of performance as my peers that I will never be employed and that's why I want so desperately to find ways to supplement my areas of weakness. This isn't just in the case of the creative industry either - there are millions of people who are faster an more efficient than I will ever be even in all types of employment, including menial labour. Trying to find the balance between what I am realistically capable of and what I have to do to survive is very difficult to achieve. But apparently others with my condition pull it off so I'll see what I can learn from others on this forum.

ILoveMyDog
07-28-17, 06:14 AM
Hey, this is my first post. I've tried so many jobs/careers, including creative, and i've fallen down every time. I'm nearly 50 and only found out about my ADHD a couple of years ago. Working from home, where my dogs are, is what i want to do but it's so tough - i just lose weeks at a time and get nothing done. and i get really depressed and isolated as i lose direction. i need others to spur me on and to bounce off. but working for other people is impossible too - i can't do things i don't think are right, i'm so much slower than others who, to me, frustratingly seem to lack thought or intelligence. i always think i'm the nicest person but i seem to really rub people up the wrong way as i have a point of view that is just so different from almost everyone else. i know the answer here is to have a small team and work for myself - people who will listen and accommodate me and yet have the skills i lack. i need to be in charge as i can't tolerate people telling me what to do.especially as i approach 50. i wish id figured this out earlier... i just haven't figured out what the business needs to be! this is always the problem - i have so many ideas but i can't realise them and as i get older and have more failures under my belt i have no dreams left and no will to take any risks or try new things. over the years I've watched so many people overtake me. its hard to look back and see the pattern. i'm at a real low point tbh - the longest I've ever stayed in a job is about a year...and then something goes wrong, i get emotional and lose communication skills, can't defend myself, panic and run away to hide and lick my wounds. i'm the same in relationships. wish i could have found the right someone to work with/ love - i think this really is the key....