View Full Version : Need some Advice... My doctor doesn't seem to take my condition seriously.


wet_it_up_papi
06-20-17, 07:02 PM
I'll try to keep this short, but I've been diagnosed with ADD when I was young. And I was prescribed what I think was Adderall. I stopped taking the my medication starting in middle school and now I'm a young adult.

I've always had trouble focusing on boring tasks like studying, listening to people at meetings, and the usual symptoms. I wouldn't say I have a severe case of ADD, but I can tell that I often unwillingly drift off when I should be focusing on something and it seems to be a constant struggle to just focus on my studies. I think it really wastes my time and patience when I am just trying to learn something.

I have never been a good student, and it was never due to inability.. But more like not being able to just focus on the work I had to do, I was always doing more interesting things and procrastinating to the last second on everything. So as a result my grades have always been kinda crappy.

I decided to go to my doctor and since the second I got there I had the feeling that the doctor was completely against the idea of Adderall or any other sort of ADD/ADHD medication (without me even suggesting it). They went on a lecture about how they thought it was addictive, not good for you, bad side effects, etc.


I was asked multiple times if I had anxiety and stress, which I said I don't.At the end the doctor even told me that "I was not taking the drug seriously". Which I thought was rather strange thing to say and uncalled for.

So finally I went to the pharmacist and it turns out that they prescribed me some anti-anxiety / anti-depressant. I got a little ****** off and just left without buying the medication. I have neither anxiety, nor am I depressed. I don't want to be taking an anti-depressant when I don't need one.

Has anybody experienced this before? Do you have any suggestions as to what I can do? I'm tired of not being able to focus.

dbloom
06-20-17, 11:41 PM
Find another doctor. I went to a walk-in clinic and spoke to a doctor about ADHD and he literally laughed at me. I went to a specialist and he took good care of me. Some people will be on your side, others won't.

inmate281
06-22-17, 03:24 AM
I second the new doctor approach.


Go to a Psych, not a GP or PCP.
Focus on the symptoms that support your diagnosis of ADHD (inattentive or hyperactive). The DSM-V requires that an adult present with at least five of the nine symptoms listed below for either Hyperactive ADHD or Inattentive ADHD (older "ADD"). If you have ADHD, five are pretty easy to present with.
Focus not only on symptoms, but on impact to (loss of) your quality of social, academic, or occupational functioning. You need to discuss it in one or more of those three terms.
Symptoms must be present (cause impairment) in two or more settings (e.g. at home and school or home and work, but not just at home; with friends and family members, not just family members).
Avoid everything else. Example, don't mention procrastination, because that can be interpreted as mood, and you may end up being treated with a mood stabilizer before getting a stimulant.


Here are the lists of nine symptoms from the DSM-V
Use this wording as much as possible.

ADHD Symptoms of inattention

Often fails to give close attention to detail or makes mistakes
Often has difficulty sustaining attention in tasks or activities
Often does not seem to listen when spoken to directly
Often does not follow through on instructions and fails to finish schoolwork or workplace duties
Often has difficulty organising tasks and activities
Often avoids, dislikes or is reluctant to engage in tasks that require sustained mental effort
Often loses things necessary for tasks or activities
Is easily distracted by extraneous stimuli
Is often forgetful in daily activities

ADHD Symptoms of hyperactivity/impulsivity

Often fidgets with or taps hands and feet, or squirms in seat
Often leaves seat in situations when remaining seated is expected
Often runs and climbs in situations where it is inappropriate (in adolescents or adults, may be limited to feeling restless)
Often unable to play or engage in leisure activities quietly
Is often ‘on the go’, acting as if ‘driven by a motor’
Often talks excessively
Often blurts out answers before a question has been completed
Often has difficulty waiting their turn
Often interrupts or intrudes on others

sarahsweets
06-27-17, 04:51 AM
I also agree with seeing a new doc and that they be a psyche.

I second the new doctor approach.


Focus on the symptoms that support your diagnosis of ADHD (inattentive or hyperactive). The DSM-V requires that an adult present with at least five of the nine symptoms listed below for either Hyperactive ADHD or Inattentive ADHD (older "ADD"). If you have ADHD, five are pretty easy to present with.
Its also important to note that these symptoms must have been present before the age of 12 so if you can get any sort of records from when you were a kid that would be good.

Avoid everything else. Example, don't mention procrastination, because that can be interpreted as mood, and you may end up being treated with a mood stabilizer before getting a stimulant.

I dont think avoiding everything else is necessarily wise because a good doctor will know that 7 out of 10 times someone with adhd has a comorbid disorder along with it. If a person does also have depression or anxiety than its important to treat both or at the very least be aware of it when starting stimulants.


Here are the lists of nine symptoms from the DSM-V
Use this wording as much as possible.

putting it like this seems a little on the malingering side even though the OP wouldnt be shooting for that. A good doctor will know which buzz words appear and be able to see through someone molding their symptoms to a standard list. I think honesty as far as how they translate into the OP's life is a better play. JMO.

mrh235
07-03-17, 02:57 AM
I'll try to keep this short, but I've been diagnosed with ADD when I was young. And I was prescribed what I think was Adderall. I stopped taking the my medication starting in middle school and now I'm a young adult.

I've always had trouble focusing on boring tasks like studying, listening to people at meetings, and the usual symptoms. I wouldn't say I have a severe case of ADD, but I can tell that I often unwillingly drift off when I should be focusing on something and it seems to be a constant struggle to just focus on my studies. I think it really wastes my time and patience when I am just trying to learn something.

I have never been a good student, and it was never due to inability.. But more like not being able to just focus on the work I had to do, I was always doing more interesting things and procrastinating to the last second on everything. So as a result my grades have always been kinda crappy.

I decided to go to my doctor and since the second I got there I had the feeling that the doctor was completely against the idea of Adderall or any other sort of ADD/ADHD medication (without me even suggesting it). They went on a lecture about how they thought it was addictive, not good for you, bad side effects, etc.


I was asked multiple times if I had anxiety and stress, which I said I don't.At the end the doctor even told me that "I was not taking the drug seriously". Which I thought was rather strange thing to say and uncalled for.

So finally I went to the pharmacist and it turns out that they prescribed me some anti-anxiety / anti-depressant. I got a little ****** off and just left without buying the medication. I have neither anxiety, nor am I depressed. I don't want to be taking an anti-depressant when I don't need one.

Has anybody experienced this before? Do you have any suggestions as to what I can do? I'm tired of not being able to focus.



I'm sorry you've went through this. Doctors can be some of the rudest, most arrogant, short-sighted, god syndrome power tripping jerks around. They also can be the worst listeners around.

Find a good psychiatrist, even if there may be trial and error involved, it'll be worth it to find a doctor who really understands your ADHD. It is very hurtful and awful that doctors do this and even more aggravating but if you can just don't let it get the best of you.

I went through this and having my ADHD treated and understood for the past 6 years not only saved my life, but is why I am where I am today. It really allowed me to face my issues and actually understand these struggles I had for so long. It infuriates me to no end that doctors can even fathom treating patients this way, and not recognize that denying us treatment for our condition is severely limiting to us and our lives.

This is why I'm in medical school and going into the medical field, so I can work to make sure nobody like us go through what we have gone through.

Just the other day though, I was told by an incredibly arrogant doctor who I was seeing for unrelated issue that "patients dont get to choose their treatments" and she just expected me to blindly follow everything she said. Uh no, medicine isn't a dictatorship. Doctors can say a lot of horrible things they have no business saying and have no perspective on.

Stay strong, and everything will work out in the end.

I also agree with seeing a new doc and that they be a psyche.





Its also important to note that these symptoms must have been present before the age of 12 so if you can get any sort of records from when you were a kid that would be good.

I dont think avoiding everything else is necessarily wise because a good doctor will know that 7 out of 10 times someone with adhd has a comorbid disorder along with it. If a person does also have depression or anxiety than its important to treat both or at the very least be aware of it when starting stimulants.



putting it like this seems a little on the malingering side even though the OP wouldnt be shooting for that. A good doctor will know which buzz words appear and be able to see through someone molding their symptoms to a standard list. I think honesty as far as how they translate into the OP's life is a better play. JMO.


agreed 100%. definitely don't mold yourself to match the diagnosis, OP. it's about seeing you have adhd and understanding how it affects you not finding in a box. My doctor was hesitant to call it ADHD in the beginning when I was first diagnosed even though he knew what it is. He just recognized it's more than a label and a really complex and frustrating condition.