View Full Version : ADHD and Play


GJMom614
06-27-17, 02:13 PM
I am a mom of two, and my younger son (10) has many symptoms of ADHD, though he has not been diagnosed. I have spent a lot of years finding resources and strategies that help manage his symptoms and behavior.

As an early childhood educator, I know how different every child can be – and diagnosis or not, knowing what he needs has made life so much calmer for all of us. The foundation of my philosophy in my preschool classroom is that children need play to thrive.

I’ve found that this helps at home, too, and the more playful we all are, the easier it is for my son to stay in control and enjoy life. Negative self-talk is a huge issue for him, and finding playful ways to change that has made a big difference (for instance, he substitutes a nonsense word (snarkydoodles) for “dumb.” It makes him laugh, and then the moment of negativity passes.

I read a great book, Playdhd, by Dr. Kirsten Milliken that has helped me look at play as a resource. Though this book has a focus on adults with ADHD, the suggestions work for any age. Play is so important – and she has some great ideas and suggestions on how to be more playful to help manage ADHD.

Anyone else used Play as a treatment? Have you seen a difference in your child's behavior? Does it smooth out the tough times?

Caco3girl
06-29-17, 10:35 AM
Um, I don't get it.

My 14 year old son plays baseball, but his adhd has affected him even there. If you are focused on the people walking on the outside of the fence it's difficult to see the fly ball coming at you.

Now that he is medicated on game days his concentration is better and he's a more effective baseball player.

Lunacie
06-29-17, 10:47 AM
It's something that comes naturally to me, and at times it has worked with my
grandkids but for some reason my autistic granddaughter has decided that I'm
trying to manipulate her when I try to lighten things up with humor.

Really, I guess it worked best when the girls were little. Once they hit their pre-
teens they change in so many ways.

She's been seeing a therapist for 10 years (different one before that) who
specializes in play-therapy, and he's been very helpful for all of us.

mildadhd
06-29-17, 03:01 PM
Yes. Supervised free play is the first line of prevention, lessening of severity and treatment for ADHD, years before medication is even an option.



M

Lunacie
06-29-17, 06:00 PM
Just went to Amazon to see more info on this book, and oh geeze, it's about
ADHD being a "gift." I won't be spending any money on it.

But, because I tend to be depressed and have anxiety, maybe a little light-
hearted humor could be helpful. So I checked with the interlibrary loan system.

Bam. Requested. Will wait to read it ... as long as the font isn't too tiny for me
to actually read. I read large print these days.

mildadhd
06-30-17, 01:07 AM
Laughter.

I have not read the book mentioned in the OP.

I am really interested in everything about supervised free play and ADHD, and will put the book on my list.

It is amazing how many essential developmental needs can be provided through supervised free play, without actually knowing much about the sciences involved.

Fun.


Laughter is the clearest signal that natural play urges are being engaged (Panksepp, 2007). Many years ago, Plato extolled the benefits of free play — “those natural modes of amusement which children find out for themselves when they meet”; continuing in The Republic [section IV] he insisted that “our children from their earliest years must take part in all the more lawful forms of play, for if they are not surrounded by such an atmosphere they can never grow up to be well conducted and virtuous citizens.” To reduce the rising incidence of ADHD, perhaps we should follow Plato’s advice and encourage more free play. More natural play may facilitate the growth of pro-social brains and minds and keep the incidence of ADHD to a minimum (Panksepp, 1998b, 2001)



http://neuroself.files.wordpress.com/2013/04/panksepp-adhd-and-play.pdf

Caco3girl
06-30-17, 08:13 AM
Just went to Amazon to see more info on this book, and oh geeze, it's about
ADHD being a "gift." I won't be spending any money on it.

But, because I tend to be depressed and have anxiety, maybe a little light-
hearted humor could be helpful. So I checked with the interlibrary loan system.

Bam. Requested. Will wait to read it ... as long as the font isn't too tiny for me
to actually read. I read large print these days.

I am dyslexic and I read a book about the gift of dyslexia and it made sense. Many innovative people have been dyslexic. I do think very differently than other people, come up with options and plans that are very outside the box. However, I have seen nothing in my 2 ADHD kids that would lead me to believe ADHD is a "gift".

It's like there is a curtain they have see through just to live in our society, sometimes it's semi transparent, other times it's jet black. For my daughter who is both ADHD and dyslexic I fear she will never find peace in this world.

mildadhd
06-30-17, 11:00 AM
I think it would be good to consider the type of play that feels good, the type of play that makes us laugh, and enjoy ourselves

The opposite of distressful experiences that make ADHD worse, there is a type of play that makes things better.

I did not read the book but I did not think the OP topic was limited to the book and author that inspired the OP thread topic.

In my opinion to turn this thread discussion about "is ADHD a gift?" is off track.

There is a type of play that is essential for healthy brain development.


M

Lunacie
06-30-17, 02:01 PM
I think it would be good to consider the type of play that feels good, the type of play that makes us laugh, and enjoy ourselves

The opposite of distressful experiences that make ADHD worse, there is a type of play that makes things better.

I did not read the book but I did not think the OP topic was limited to the book and author that inspired the OP thread topic.

In my opinion to turn this thread discussion about "is ADHD a gift?" is off track.

There is a type of play that is essential for healthy brain development.


M

After I've read the book I'll report back on whether the author really is saying
that playful attitude can release the "gifts" of adhd. From the blurb and some
of the comments on Amazon, it looks like that's what she means.

The blurb says that "play is the pathway to being an ADHD superstar!"
And lists a bunch of people who have been successful "superstars" despite
having adhd.

But most of us understand that even though they've found a way to be a
superstar in one aspect of their lives, they may be struggling in other areas.
Just like any other demographic, a few are superstars while others are pretty
ordinary. I find it really irritating when someone tells us that we should all be
superstars because otherwise we're what ... a waste of space?

mildadhd
06-30-17, 09:06 PM
I am focusing on playing that is fun.

Example.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r77sNKZV26g

Play that promotes friendship.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_NPOD92a78I

mildadhd
07-01-17, 02:25 PM
..Anyone else used Play as a treatment?..

Yes, i have inherited PLAY from my biological parents and playing has been a huge factor in ADHD treatment, both before and after diagnosis.




M

mildadhd
07-03-17, 02:25 AM
Is it possible that some people have underaroused PLAY systems'?

I wonder how many people (ADHD, or not) are born with overaroused PLAY systems'?




m

sarahsweets
07-09-17, 05:48 AM
I think we are overthinking playing. let it happen but dont over-analyse it.

Lunacie
07-09-17, 08:57 AM
I think we are overthinking playing. let it happen but dont over-analyse it.

I agree about over-analyzing playing, but my daughter and I both learned a lot
from watching the play therapist working/playing with my autistic granddaughter.

I agree about not over-analyzing playing, just want to say that my daughter
and I both learned a lot from watching the play therapist working/playing with
my autistic granddaughter. There wasn't any analyzing going on, but there was
some very good learning happening. Now that she's 15 we leave the room but I
believe the focus is still on using play as a way to interact with the world.

mildadhd
07-09-17, 02:17 PM
Um, I don't get it.

My 14 year old son plays baseball, but his adhd has affected him even there. If you are focused on the people walking on the outside of the fence it's difficult to see the fly ball coming at you.

Now that he is medicated on game days his concentration is better and he's a more effective baseball player.


I do not remember completing a book or even an a short story, or a even round of pitch and putt golf, until the about age of 35 and when I started taking medication.

After I started taking medication, I bought and read a child's book about "learning to play golf".

I have learned to play golf waaaaay better with medication.


There is a type of emotional PLAY that is genetic, that we do not need to learn.

The first type of PLAY is instinctual.

That is the type of play I am first and foremost focusing on.


"Free play" that promotes the development of higher executive functions, when the child feels supervised safe.

Safe supervised free play is a way to promote brain development of higher executive functions, years before taking ADHD medication is even an option.



M

sarahsweets
07-10-17, 05:27 AM
I agree about over-analyzing playing, but my daughter and I both learned a lot
from watching the play therapist working/playing with my autistic granddaughter.

I agree about not over-analyzing playing, just want to say that my daughter
and I both learned a lot from watching the play therapist working/playing with
my autistic granddaughter. There wasn't any analyzing going on, but there was
some very good learning happening. Now that she's 15 we leave the room but I
believe the focus is still on using play as a way to interact with the world.
I didnt mean to imply that play therapy wasnt important or that nothing can be learned from play. I just meant maybe such abstract and deep thinking about it is overkill.

Lunacie
07-10-17, 10:00 AM
I didnt mean to imply that play therapy wasnt important or that nothing can be learned from play. I just meant maybe such abstract and deep thinking about it is overkill.

I know that's what you meant. That's why I said I agree that over-anaylizing or
over-thinking the whole concept seems rather pointless unless you're studying
play therapy or psychology. Not as a topic on a forum like this one.

mildadhd
07-10-17, 01:04 PM
I am a step dad.

I am so thankful step dads often do not have the authority to discipline their step children.

Instead of punishing my step son, I took him to the park, and played.

Playing does not cost money.

Most of all playing is fun.

What could be more rewarding to a child than playing?



m

mildadhd
07-10-17, 01:20 PM
.. Have you seen a difference in your child's behavior? Does it smooth out the tough times?

We definitely communicate better after supervised free play.

Walking to and from the park also promotes the essential healthy attachment and attunment relationship

After an hour or two, of supervised free play, we would often get daily chores done, without protest.



M

Lunacie
07-10-17, 01:41 PM
I'm waiting for the library loan system to get this book to me. I'm interested
in seeing how I can incorporate a more playful attitude into my life as an adult.
The book was written for adults. If I can become more playful in general, it
could help me deal with my granddaughter when she's being more ODD.

Caco3girl
07-10-17, 02:18 PM
I do not remember completing a book or even an a short story, or a even round of pitch and putt golf, until the about age of 35 and when I started taking medication.

After I started taking medication, I bought and read a child's book about "learning to play golf".

I have learned to play golf waaaaay better with medication.


There is a type of emotional PLAY that is genetic, that we do not need to learn.

The first type of PLAY is instinctual.

That is the type of play I am first and foremost focusing on.


"Free play" that promotes the development of higher executive functions, when the child feels supervised safe.

Safe supervised free play is a way to promote brain development of higher executive functions, years before taking ADHD medication is even an option.



M
LOL, ok, I have to say though every time I see my son "free playing" there does not appear to be ANY higher executive functions going on. If he is 14 now that makes him about 10 after the 30% ADHD issue, and when he is free playing I'm guessing his age is about 4! But he's still adorable so I guess I'll keep him.

mildadhd
07-10-17, 08:36 PM
Free play being associated immaturity.

If people who have AD(H)D have higher executive functions' that are 30% less mature, are we 30% more playful and require 30% more free play?



M

Caco3girl
07-11-17, 08:29 AM
Free play being associated immaturity.

If people who have AD(H)D have higher executive functions' that are 30% less mature, are we 30% more playful and require 30% more free play?



M

I can agree with that. My son is not a couch potato. He needs to be up and active, be it playing or running or working out. Sitting still is not his thing. Also, when we discuss majors, college, and future careers; his ADHD leanings of not being inside, and being active are a main focus. While he is brilliant at math, the idea of him being an accountant at a desk all day is out of the question. Sitting still is counter to who he is.

mildadhd
07-11-17, 02:51 PM
I can agree with that. My son is not a couch potato. He needs to be up and active, be it playing or running or working out. Sitting still is not his thing. Also, when we discuss majors, college, and future careers; his ADHD leanings of not being inside, and being active are a main focus. While he is brilliant at math, the idea of him being an accountant at a desk all day is out of the question. Sitting still is counter to who he is.


Interesting.

Affective Neuroscientist Jaak Panksepp wondered about making recess (a type of supervised free play) the first class of every school day, partly to help the more hyperkinetic children.



M

mildadhd
07-14-17, 02:02 PM
I wonder if it is ok to say PLAY promotes "social rehearsal"?



M

daveddd
07-15-17, 12:12 AM
LOL, ok, I have to say though every time I see my son "free playing" there does not appear to be ANY higher executive functions going on. If he is 14 now that makes him about 10 after the 30% ADHD issue, and when he is free playing I'm guessing his age is about 4! But he's still adorable so I guess I'll keep him.

That's debatable , remember not every kid with ADHD is the same

play helps develop planning, reconstitution, and the ability to internalize imagery, a function crucial to goal directed behavior and self regulation. primary executive dysfunctions in ADHD.

I don't think anyone thinks it will cure ADHD or make it a gift. But maybe HElp alter the end results, which varies greatly and can be the difference in quality of life

Caco3girl
07-17-17, 09:18 AM
Interesting.

Affective Neuroscientist Jaak Panksepp wondered about making recess (a type of supervised free play) the first class of every school day, partly to help the more hyperkinetic children.



M

Not a good plan. It's in my son's IEP that any gym classes should be at the end of the day, and his harder classes should be in the beginning of the day. When gym is 1st or second period he burns through his meds WAY faster and they are gone by lunch.

mildadhd
07-17-17, 08:02 PM
Not a good plan. It's in my son's IEP that any gym classes should be at the end of the day, and his harder classes should be in the beginning of the day. When gym is 1st or second period he burns through his meds WAY faster and they are gone by lunch.

Very interesting.

I did not take medication when I was in school.

I take medication when I get up in the morning and afternoon, and it works better, and I feel happier, if I take breaks and get some exercise.

The acting duration of my medication is pretty consistent, I have never noticed it working less, unless I do not get enough sleep, or need a rare medication holiday.

I would have been all for recess being first class in the morning and gym being the last class in the day.

I probably would have wanted to go to school in the morning and not want to leave in the afternoon.

I was also thinking supervised free play, early before trying the medication option and also possibly reducing misdiagnosis (early in life), recognize kids learning preferences, help teachers recognize individual children's temperaments and help provide accommodations, holiday treatment options, etc.





M

Caco3girl
07-18-17, 09:29 AM
My son takes 40mg Adderal XR at 6am when I wake him up. That has to last him until 3:30, it usually does.

At one point he was on 20mg Adderal in the morning and 20mg Adderal after lunch but the new dr. was concerned about the addictive qualities of the instant release tablets, and wanted him on the XR versions.

It's easier on me since I would have to hand carry the medicine to school every month and they are open when I am at work, so that wasn't really working out well for me.

He wasn't formerly diagnosed until 8th grade, he was very active and had a lot of play in his life but it didn't keep the brain fog away.

mildadhd
07-20-17, 05:27 PM
Not a good plan. It's in my son's IEP that any gym classes should be at the end of the day, and his harder classes should be in the beginning of the day. When gym is 1st or second period he burns through his meds WAY faster and they are gone by lunch.

I am not anti medication.

I think supervised free play is the first line treatment for AD(H)D, years before medication is an option.

Do you think supervised free play was your son's first line of treatment?

Do you think recess being the first class and gym being the last class would have been a good plan, before your son was old enough to start taking medication?



m

Rapunzel16
07-22-17, 11:09 PM
My son is 6 and free play is the way he decompresses. He loves to play with toy figures (animals, characters, anything) or build with legos. Outdoor free play at a playground works too, sometimes better. It's the open-endedness that just helps him relax and calm his mind, when so many other things require him to focus on predetermined activities it's good to just let go. At least that's my impression. It's something he really needs time for each day.

Caco3girl
07-25-17, 09:48 AM
I am not anti medication.

I think supervised free play is the first line treatment for AD(H)D, years before medication is an option.

Do you think supervised free play was your son's first line of treatment?

Do you think recess being the first class and gym being the last class would have been a good plan, before your son was old enough to start taking medication?



m

Due to wide variety of circumstances my son wasn't diagnosed until the middle of 8th grade. Therefore, he wasn't on medication prior to that time.

I think once he hit 5th grade his ADHD came out front and center. It didn't matter how much he ran, played baseball, played basketball, played soccer...none of it changed the fact that he couldn't understand what the teacher was talking about because he spaced out for more than half the class. When they evaluated him in 8th grade the estimated that for a 45 minute class he was mentally present for about 20 minutes of it.

Perhaps your theory of free-play being the first line of defense prior to medication would have been effective for the hyperactive aspects of ADHD but my son is on the more inattentive side. Nothing helped him until the medicine.

mildadhd
07-25-17, 11:25 AM
I can agree with that. My son is not a couch potato. He needs to be up and active, be it playing or running or working out. Sitting still is not his thing. Also, when we discuss majors, college, and future careers; his ADHD leanings of not being inside, and being active are a main focus. While he is brilliant at math, the idea of him being an accountant at a desk all day is out of the question. Sitting still is counter to who he is.


I am not against medication.

Medication is not the only treatment for ADHD.

I was diagnosed with ADD.

Exercise/free play helped me tremendously as well, before being diagnosed at age 35 and started taking medication..

Supervised free play is a way to help treat ADHD years before any child is old enough to take medication.


M

Caco3girl
07-25-17, 03:20 PM
I am not against medication.

Medication is not the only treatment for ADHD.

I was diagnosed with ADD.

Exercise/free play helped me tremendously as well, before being diagnosed at age 35 and started taking medication..

Supervised free play is a way to help treat ADHD years before any child is old enough to take medication.


M

I have no idea what you mean about a child being old enough to take medicine. I also have no faith in free play helping my kid be mentally present in class. Perhaps there are varying degrees of ADHD, if so, my son is on the faaaaaaaaaar deep end.

He is off his meds right now, it's summer and i want him to eat and gain weight. A family member hadn't seen him in 5 years, he spoke with him on Thursday night and then again on Friday morning. He flat out said "Wow, yesterday I just thought you were stoned, but this is just you isn't it?"....yup....that's my kid! He gets so lost in his own head and can't focus on the conversation that he appears stoned.

mildadhd
07-25-17, 04:32 PM
I am sorry.

I thought you were saying earlier that your son needed play.




M

mildadhd
07-25-17, 04:48 PM
After an hour or two of supervised free play, almost everyday, I had little problem getting his attention after supervised free play.

When my step son was young he would never tell me when he had a runny nose if he was also feeling really sick, if he had a stomach cramps/flu, if there was something wrong at school, but I could sometimes tell something was up by watching him play, or playing with him.

I learned that he would tell me things walking to and from the park, if I kept my mouth shut.

Still works today when we go for walks, if I keep my mouth shut.




M

sarahsweets
07-26-17, 10:28 AM
No, supervised play is not a treatment for adhd. Its good for adhd kids but its good for ALL kids, even those not being treated for adhd. Meds arent the only option either.

I am not against medication.

Medication is not the only treatment for ADHD.

I was diagnosed with ADD.

Exercise/free play helped me tremendously as well, before being diagnosed at age 35 and started taking medication..

Supervised free play is a way to help treat ADHD years before any child is old enough to take medication.


M

sarahsweets
07-26-17, 10:30 AM
Supervised free play is a way to help treat ADHD years before any child is old enough to take medication.


M
When you say old enough what do you mean?

mildadhd
07-26-17, 04:49 PM
Yes, supervised free play is a treatment for AD(H)D.

I am primarily focusing on supervised free play during first few years of life, during the critical period of implicit regulation, before the age of 4-7*, in regards to possible prevention, treatment/lessening impact, before medication is a treatment option.

I am secondarily focusing on supervised free play after the age of 4-7*, during the critical period of explicit regulation in regards to part of longer term treatment/lessening impact.

*give or take a few years


Play: Free play, in which children develop their own activities, including rough-and-tumble activities that, as the term play implies, involves physical activity such as running, jumping, play fighting, and wrestling, are increasingly recognized as essential components of a child’s development. Both human and animal studies have provided evidence that periods of play improve social skills, impulse inhibition and attention (Panksepp, 2007; Pellis et al., 2010) and result in specific neurochemical and dendritic changes in many neurons (Bell et al., 2010; Panksepp, 2008), especially in those brain areas in which ADHD children are deficient. Therefore, long-term provision of more opportunities for physical play may be an effective, non-medicinal therapy for reducing some of the disruptive behaviors of ADHD and facilitating brain development in children diagnosed with ADHD..


http://www.scholarpedia.org/article/ADHD_and_Play




M

Caco3girl
07-27-17, 08:43 AM
I am sorry.

I thought you were saying earlier that your son needed play.




M

If my son had a choice he would not sit in classrooms for 7 hours a day, he would be outside or at least in a gym, in motion. However, he doesn't have that choice right now. Long term we are taking his ADHD into account while considering different jobs/majors so he doesn't trap himself into being inside all day.

I have to agree that free play is not a way to treat ADHD, it may be helpful to ADHD kids, as it is helpful for all kids, but it isn't a treatment. If my son played from 6am-8am it wouldn't stop his need for his medicine so he could focus in school, something that is a "treatment" would.

Caco3girl
07-27-17, 08:51 AM
Yes, supervised free play is a treatment for AD(H)D.

I am primarily focusing on supervised free play during first few years of life, during the critical period of implicit regulation, before the age of 4-7*, in regards to possible prevention, treatment/lessening impact, before medication is a treatment option.

I am secondarily focusing on supervised free play after the age of 4-7*, during the critical period of explicit regulation in regards to part of longer term treatment/lessening impact.

*give or take a few years





http://www.scholarpedia.org/article/ADHD_and_Play




M

I would define "some of the disruptive behaviors" as the hyperactive part of ADHD. I can see how being active for 2 hours would help a hyperactive kid out, but only short term, not as a replacement for medicine.

Perhaps I'm wrong, but you seem to be giving off the impression that the hyperactive part of being ADHD is like there is a gauge in the kids body and when it reaches critical he starts bouncing off the walls and by playing you can keep the gauge down...it's not like that. Being hyperactive is who they are, it's how they cope with life because that's the speed in which their brains move. 2 hours of exercise isn't going to eliminate that in their brains.

mildadhd
07-27-17, 09:39 AM
No, supervised play is not a treatment for adhd. Its good for adhd kids but its good for ALL kids, even those not being treated for adhd. Meds arent the only option either.



Because supervised free play promotes the development of self-regulation for every child (ADHD or not), does not mean supervised free play is not treatment for ADHD.

It would be evidence that supervised free play is treatment for ADHD, both before medication is an option, aswell as after medication is an option.


M

Caco3girl
07-27-17, 10:12 AM
Because supervised free play promotes the development of self-regulation for every child (ADHD or not), does not mean supervised free play is not treatment for ADHD.

It would be evidence that supervised free play is treatment for ADHD, both before medication is an option, aswell as after medication is an option.


M

Please show the study that states free play is an effective treatment for ADHD. Not that it helps "reduce some of the disruptive behaviors of ADHD" people, that it can replace medicine as a treatment.

My kid is ACTIVE, I mean if it's above 40 degrees he is outside until dark active. When I sold the house he lived in from age 3-11 I had to re-sod the front lawn because he played on it so much it was just gone. He has been in sports since age 6, running, jumping, trampoline, baseball, basketball (have a hoop in our driveway), soccer, bike riding...etc.

If free play was effective as a treatment his school situation would not have deteriorated to the point where he needed medication. He is still active and with the medication his school issues have become nearly non-existent.

mildadhd
07-27-17, 10:44 AM
Please show the study that states free play is an effective treatment for ADHD. Not that it helps "reduce some of the disruptive behaviors of ADHD" people, that it can replace medicine as a treatment.

My kid is ACTIVE, I mean if it's above 40 degrees he is outside until dark active. When I sold the house he lived in from age 3-11 I had to re-sod the front lawn because he played on it so much it was just gone. He has been in sports since age 6, running, jumping, trampoline, baseball, basketball (have a hoop in our driveway), soccer, bike riding...etc.

If free play was effective as a treatment his school situation would not have deteriorated to the point where he needed medication. He is still active and with the medication his school issues have become nearly non-existent.

I'm learning a lot, thanks.

What types of PLAY does your son prefere when he is not taking medication?



M

Unmanagable
07-27-17, 10:48 AM
If my son had a choice he would not sit in classrooms for 7 hours a day, he would be outside or at least in a gym, in motion. However, he doesn't have that choice right now. Long term we are taking his ADHD into account while considering different jobs/majors so he doesn't trap himself into being inside all day.

I have to agree that free play is not a way to treat ADHD, it may be helpful to ADHD kids, as it is helpful for all kids, but it isn't a treatment. If my son played from 6am-8am it wouldn't stop his need for his medicine so he could focus in school, something that is a "treatment" would.

I don't have kids that I'm trying to treat, and I haven't read all of the posts here, but speaking for myself, as a former kid who went undiagnosed for decades, and especially as someone who has tried the meds route and found them to have way too many side effects to be able to continue to rely on, I have to use multiple treatment methods to help keep all of my issues/symptoms in check, none of which cancel out the other, but rather work together in concert with each other to enhance the effects. I also deal with other issues in addition to adhd, so everyone's mileage will vary.

I would hope that all the folks who use meds as treatment also use other treatment methods in addition to, rather than simply relying fully on the pills to keep their symptoms in check and to keep them functional. One of the best things I ever learned here back in the day is that pills don't teach skills.

Treatment is defined as being the use of an agent in helping to manage disease. If your dis-ease is being managed and your chosen agent is play, then it's a treatment method. Combined with other helpful healthful methods, it can be quite beneficial by enhancing each other, as I've learned in dealing with my own issues.

I guess there are formal treatments and informal, similar to formal education and informal. One is always valued much higher than the other, it seems, so a lot of folks pass on by the informal stuff feeling it simply isn't worthy, for whatever reasons. And many automatically dismiss anything that doesn't already have substantial amounts of peer reviewed science backing it up.

The only way I learned how beneficial and valuable all of the other more informal stuff truly is was by being left miserable, desperate, and feeling as if I had no choice by all the formal folks we're typically sent to in hopes of finding clear and effective answers.

If that's the way 'treatments' are viewed by many, it's no wonder we struggle so much in finding things that work. Every single action we do that goes towards helping to reel in and healthily manage our symptoms is considered a treatment, in my mind.

There's not been a single solution that covers everything that I've found in my pursuits. It has taken a village of treatment methods. Finding relief has been much more like an ongoing essay question or an ongoing research paper than it has been a simple multiple choice and then be done with it. Although for a long time, I was hoping like hell there would be that one easy answer.

Every morning as soon as I'm out of bed, I head to my mini-trampoline and hula hoop for a few minutes (or a few songs) worth of "play" that most adults refer to as exercise. Then I venture into nature to see what treasures I can spot during a morning walk. Doing those things each day ensures I'll greatly enhance my other treatment options and will likely have a much better day than if I don't do those things. I can imagine if I were being supervised or accompanied by someone who didn't believe in what I was doing, or in my right or need to do it, it would definitely take away from the effectiveness.

Without freely releasing that energy, getting the flow going within, and increasing the oxygenation of my cells, along with choosing clean nurturing hydration, clean nurturing foods as my fuel and foundation, etc., etc., sometimes several times a day, I'd still be miserable and trapped in a fog much of the day with very little energy and no desire to even participate in life.

I lived for quite a few years like that, relying fully on doctors and their suggested and rigorously studied methods and such. I ended up damn near bedridden for some time while following their formal and highly educated advice to the letter. My quality of life went down the toilet at turbo speed during those days thanks to their suggested treatments and guidance.

Glad to have crossed paths with many of the more informal ways to help dig me up out of my various ditches. I wish the more formal avenues would work more closely with the informal ones for a more complete and sustainable healing experience. Especially in the school, medical, and mental health arenas. Because right now, there's way too many left suffering and being set up for failure. Maybe one day...

mildadhd
07-27-17, 11:05 AM
There are people who choose not to take medication.

There are some people with some other commorbbiddittes, that are unable to take medication for various reasons.





M

mildadhd
07-27-17, 11:12 AM
My son is 6 and free play is the way he decompresses. He loves to play with toy figures (animals, characters, anything) or build with legos. Outdoor free play at a playground works too, sometimes better. It's the open-endedness that just helps him relax and calm his mind, when so many other things require him to focus on predetermined activities it's good to just let go. At least that's my impression. It's something he really needs time for each day.

Beautiful

Your attuned presents in the relationship is essential.

I forgot about all the benefits of the outdoors.

Outdoor supervised free play.

What do you mean "decompresses"?

Cools down?



M

mildadhd
07-27-17, 11:22 AM
I don't have kids that I'm trying to treat, and I haven't read all of the posts here, but speaking for myself, as a former kid who went undiagnosed for decades, and especially as someone who has tried the meds route and found them to have way too many side effects to be able to continue to rely on, I have to use multiple treatment methods to help keep all of my issues/symptoms in check, none of which cancel out the other, but rather work together in concert with each other to enhance the effects. I also deal with other issues in addition to adhd, so everyone's mileage will vary.

I would hope that all the folks who use meds as treatment also use other treatment methods in addition to, rather than simply relying fully on the pills to keep their symptoms in check and to keep them functional. One of the best things I ever learned here back in the day is that pills don't teach skills.

Treatment is defined as being the use of an agent in helping to manage disease. If your dis-ease is being managed and your chosen agent is play, then it's a treatment method. Combined with other helpful healthful methods, it can be quite beneficial by enhancing each other, as I've learned in dealing with my own issues.

I guess there are formal treatments and informal, similar to formal education and informal. One is always valued much higher than the other, it seems, so a lot of folks pass on by the informal stuff feeling it simply isn't worthy, for whatever reasons. And many automatically dismiss anything that doesn't already have substantial amounts of peer reviewed science backing it up.

The only way I learned how beneficial and valuable all of the other more informal stuff truly is was by being left miserable, desperate, and feeling as if I had no choice by all the formal folks we're typically sent to in hopes of finding clear and effective answers.

If that's the way 'treatments' are viewed by many, it's no wonder we struggle so much in finding things that work. Every single action we do that goes towards helping to reel in and healthily manage our symptoms is considered a treatment, in my mind.

There's not been a single solution that covers everything that I've found in my pursuits. It has taken a village of treatment methods. Finding relief has been much more like an ongoing essay question or an ongoing research paper than it has been a simple multiple choice and then be done with it. Although for a long time, I was hoping like hell there would be that one easy answer.

Every morning as soon as I'm out of bed, I head to my mini-trampoline and hula hoop for a few minutes (or a few songs) worth of "play" that most adults refer to as exercise. Then I venture into nature to see what treasures I can spot during a morning walk. Doing those things each day ensures I'll greatly enhance my other treatment options and will likely have a much better day than if I don't do those things. I can imagine if I were being supervised or accompanied by someone who didn't believe in what I was doing, or in my right or need to do it, it would definitely take away from the effectiveness.

Without freely releasing that energy, getting the flow going within, and increasing the oxygenation of my cells, along with choosing clean nurturing hydration, clean nurturing foods as my fuel and foundation, etc., etc., sometimes several times a day, I'd still be miserable and trapped in a fog much of the day with very little energy and no desire to even participate in life.

I lived for quite a few years like that, relying fully on doctors and their suggested and rigorously studied methods and such. I ended up damn near bedridden for some time while following their formal and highly educated advice to the letter. My quality of life went down the toilet at turbo speed during those days thanks to their suggested treatments and guidance.

Glad to have crossed paths with many of the more informal ways to help dig me up out of my various ditches. I wish the more formal avenues would work more closely with the informal ones for a more complete and sustainable healing experience. Especially in the school, medical, and mental health arenas. Because right now, there's way too many left suffering and being set up for failure. Maybe one day...

Maybe one day everyone will have a "mini-trampoline and hula hoop for a few minutes (or a few songs) in the morning worth of "play" that most adults refer to as exercise."

Great stuff!

Mini-trampolines and hula hoops as far as the eye can see. :)

Edit: The more I think about this the more fascinated I become because you push on the mini-trampoline and the mini-trampoline pushes back.




M

mildadhd
07-27-17, 11:32 AM
supervised mini-trampoline

vs

unsupervised mini-trampoline




M

Caco3girl
07-27-17, 11:50 AM
I'm learning a lot, thanks.

What types of PLAY does your son prefere when he is not taking medication?



M

The same things he does when he's on the medication. Baseball, basketball, running, swimming, weight lifting, biking...etc. I haven't' medicated him all summer and he's the same kid...although maybe a bit moodier, but that could be because he's a 15 year old boy who of course thinks he is about 25 and thinks my rules are stupid, as most boys think their parents rules are stupid and they know WAY more than us.

mildadhd
07-27-17, 12:09 PM
The same things he does when he's on the medication. Baseball, basketball, running, swimming, weight lifting, biking...etc. I haven't' medicated him all summer and he's the same kid...although maybe a bit moodier, but that could be because he's a 15 year old boy who of course thinks he is about 25 and thinks my rules are stupid, as most boys think their parents rules are stupid and they know WAY more than us.

Do you think he benefited from supervised free play before ever taking medication?

Do you think he benefits from supervised free play when he is not taking medication?




M

sarahsweets
07-27-17, 01:11 PM
Mild- you never answered my question about being too young(or however it was worded) for medication. What do you mean?

mildadhd
07-27-17, 01:37 PM
Mild- you never answered my question about being too young(or however it was worded) for medication. What do you mean?

A massive amount of development of our self-regulation occurs before the age of 7.

If a doctor thinks it is ok for a child to start taking medication for the first time at the age of 7.

In this case, there would be six years before medication was a treatment option.



M

Caco3girl
07-27-17, 03:22 PM
Do you think he benefited from supervised free play before ever taking medication?

Do you think he benefits from supervised free play when he is not taking medication?




M

No, I see not benefit in my near 15 year old have free play with or without the medication.

My daughter is 8 and she is more hyperactive, for her playing and exerting energy does help with SOME of her hyperactive things, but it does not help with her ability to sit down in a chair and learn for 45 minutes. For that, she takes medication.

sarahsweets
07-27-17, 04:10 PM
A massive amount of development of our self-regulation occurs before the age of 7.

If a doctor thinks it is ok for a child to start taking medication for the first time at the age of 7.

In this case, there would be six years before medication was a treatment option.



M

Do you mean a child should not take medicine before the age of 7? Or age 6?

mildadhd
07-27-17, 05:50 PM
Do you mean a child should not take medicine before the age of 7? Or age 6?


If I remember correctly, you said your son started taking medication at 3.5 years of age?

So he would have had roughly 3.5 years before medication was an option.

Depends on the individual.

I read doctors recommend behavioral type therapy like supervised free play instead of medication before at the age of 6, but I am sure there could be some exceptions, depending on sensitivity of inherited temperament and individual circumstances.




M

Caco3girl
07-28-17, 01:23 PM
If I remember correctly, you said your son started taking medication at 3.5 years of age?

So he would have had roughly 3.5 years before medication was an option.

Depends on the individual.

I read doctors recommend behavioral type therapy like supervised free play instead of medication before at the age of 6, but I am sure there could be some exceptions, depending on sensitivity of inherited temperament and individual circumstances.




M

Your choice of words is very odd. Medication is an "option" from birth.

Do you have a kid with ADHD? Or are you researching an article or something.

mildadhd
07-28-17, 03:15 PM
Outdoor supervised free playful behavior therapy.

Behavior therapy is effective treatment for attention-
deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) that can improve a child’s behavior, self-control, and self-esteem. It is most effective in young children when it is delivered by parents. Experts recommend that doctors refer parents of children under 6 years old for training in behavior therapy before prescribing ADHD medicine. When parents become trained in behavior therapy, they learn skills and strategies to help their child with ADHD succeed at school, at home, and in relationships.

Behavior therapy, given by parents and with the support of healthcare providers, teaches children to better control their own behavior, leading to improved functioning at school, home and in relationships. Learning and practicing behavior therapy requires time and effort, but it has lasting benefits for the child.


http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/adhd/behavior-therapy.html

Lunacie
07-28-17, 03:50 PM
Outdoor supervised free playful behavior therapy.

Behavior therapy is effective treatment for attention-
deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) that can improve a child’s behavior, self-control, and self-esteem. It is most effective in young children when it is delivered by parents. Experts recommend that doctors refer parents of children under 6 years old for training in behavior therapy before prescribing ADHD medicine. When parents become trained in behavior therapy, they learn skills and strategies to help their child with ADHD succeed at school, at home, and in relationships.

Behavior therapy, given by parents and with the support of healthcare providers, teaches children to better control their own behavior, leading to improved functioning at school, home and in relationships. Learning and practicing behavior therapy requires time and effort, but it has lasting benefits for the child.


http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/adhd/behavior-therapy.html





Do you know of any places where parents can get this kind of training?

Added ... I checked the links embedded in your quote link ... and none
are within reasonable driving distance.

I know that play can be useful as therapy ... but it may not be so simple
to learn how to use it effectively.

sarahsweets
07-28-17, 04:14 PM
If I remember correctly, you said your son started taking medication at 3.5 years of age?

So he would have had roughly 3.5 years before medication was an option.

Depends on the individual.
Im sorry I am still getting mixed up. Do you mean in general he had 3.5 before medication was an option because he was diagnosed at age 3.5 and medicated at age 4? or do you mean he was 3.5 years too early for meds? I am really just trying to make out your points.

I read doctors recommend behavioral type therapy like supervised free play instead of medication before at the age of 6, but I am sure there could be some exceptions, depending on sensitivity of inherited temperament and individual circumstances.

What reliable sources do you have that say medication should not be used before the age of 6, and that freeplay is the better solution before age 6? The dsm did change up somethings when it comes to ages for diagnosis of young children. I know when he was diagnosed, it was 1999 and the science still was lacking and he was one of a handful of kids in the state to be diagnosed at age 3.5 and medicated at age 4. Our psyche was affiliated with a teaching hospital and worked in psychiatry and neurology and had access to more cutting edge sort of science and data. She was very up on new changes to the dsm, treatment options and studies.



M[/QUOTE]

mildadhd
07-28-17, 05:33 PM
It's something that comes naturally to me, and at times it has worked with my
grandkids but for some reason my autistic granddaughter has decided that I'm
trying to manipulate her when I try to lighten things up with humor.

Really, I guess it worked best when the girls were little. Once they hit their pre-
teens they change in so many ways.

She's been seeing a therapist for 10 years (different one before that) who
specializes in play-therapy, and he's been very helpful for all of us.

I found it is best to avoid any "humour" that a more sensitive child/person might interpret as sarcasm/manipulation.

I am so glad play-therapy has been working so well for your granddaughter, for so long.





M

Lunacie
07-28-17, 05:39 PM
I found it is best to avoid any "humour" that a more sensitive child might interpret as sarcasm/manipulation.

I am so glad play-therapy has been working so well for your granddaughter, for so long.





M

I don't intend for the humor to come across as sarcasm/manipulation. I would
certainly avoid that if I understood which things are taken as such.

mildadhd
07-28-17, 05:49 PM
I don't intend for the humor to come across as sarcasm/manipulation. I would
certainly avoid that if I understood which things are taken as such.

I know what you mean, it really helps now that I am more aware of my own and others hypersensitive temperaments.

When I screw up, I find it important to admit and apologize to my step son as soon as possible.




M

Lunacie
07-28-17, 06:53 PM
I know what you mean, it really helps now that I am more aware of my own and others hypersensitive temperaments.

When I screw up, I find it important to admit and apologize to my step son as soon as possible.




M

Yes, I always tell her that I'm sorry and I didn't mean for it to sound the way it sounded to her.

mildadhd
07-28-17, 09:12 PM
Yes, I always tell her that I'm sorry and I didn't mean for it to sound the way it sounded to her.

There is a few times I remember being sarcastic to my step son when I was grumpy, or tired.

But after reading the look on his face, I realized I just made things worse.

I apologized for being sarcastic, and am trying really hard not to be sarcastic again.

I would not mention the child's hypersensitive temperament to him, in my apology.

The hypersensitive child might perceive as if I am criticizing him, for him being hypersensitive.



M

sarahsweets
07-30-17, 05:13 AM
Mild, can you shed more light on what you meant about medication and a child age 6 or 7?
Im sorry I am still getting mixed up. Do you mean in general he had 3.5 before medication was an option because he was diagnosed at age 3.5 and medicated at age 4? or do you mean he was 3.5 years too early for meds? I am really just trying to make out your points.


What reliable sources do you have that say medication should not be used before the age of 6, and that freeplay is the better solution before age 6? The dsm did change up somethings when it comes to ages for diagnosis of young children. I know when he was diagnosed, it was 1999 and the science still was lacking and he was one of a handful of kids in the state to be diagnosed at age 3.5 and medicated at age 4. Our psyche was affiliated with a teaching hospital and worked in psychiatry and neurology and had access to more cutting edge sort of science and data. She was very up on new changes to the dsm, treatment options and studies.



M[/QUOTE]

mildadhd
07-30-17, 12:39 PM
Mild, can you shed more light on what you meant about medication and a child age 6 or 7?


Sure.

*If a child started taking medication at age 4.

The child would have lived approx 4 years before trying the medication option.

In this case, supervised free play would have been an option to help promote the development of implicit and explicit self-regulation, approx 4 years before medication was a treatment option.




**If a child started taking medication at age 5

The child would have lived approx 5 years before trying the medication option.

In this case, supervised free play would have been an option to help promote the development of implicit and explicit self-regulation, approx 5 years before medication was a treatment option.




***If a child started taking medication at age 6.

The child would have lived approx 6 years before trying the medication option.

In this case, supervised free play would have been an option to help promote the development of implicit and explicit self-regulation, approx 6 years before medication was a treatment option.




***If a child started taking medication at age 7.

The child would have lived approx 7 years before trying the medication option.

In this case, supervised free play would have been an option to help promote the development of implicit and explicit self-regulation, approx 7 years before medication was a treatment option.








M

Caco3girl
07-31-17, 10:08 AM
I found the cdc website you were using, it says "Experts recommend that doctors refer parents of children under 6 years old for training in behavior therapy before prescribing ADHD medicine".

You may interpret this as them saying behavior therapy and supervised play is the first line of treatment for ADHD kids, but I read it as saying This behavior therapy will help with the outbursts but when the kid reaches school age switch to medication.

As I have stated, my son wasn't diagnosed until 8th grade, but he did play often. I see two scenarios, either play did not help him at all, or play assisted him in hiding his ADHD from the world and me. In either case I'm not thinking we should advertise that play is a treatment for ADHD.

Lunacie
07-31-17, 10:34 AM
I found the cdc website you were using, it says "Experts recommend that doctors refer parents of children under 6 years old for training in behavior therapy before prescribing ADHD medicine".

You may interpret this as them saying behavior therapy and supervised play is the first line of treatment for ADHD kids, but I read it as saying This behavior therapy will help with the outbursts but when the kid reaches school age switch to medication.

As I have stated, my son wasn't diagnosed until 8th grade, but he did play often. I see two scenarios, either play did not help him at all, or play assisted him in hiding his ADHD from the world and me. In either case I'm not thinking we should advertise that play is a treatment for ADHD.

Also, as I pointed out in an earlier post, it seems to be very difficult to find
places that offer parent training for this.

mildadhd
07-31-17, 11:05 AM
I found the cdc website you were using, it says "Experts recommend that doctors refer parents of children under 6 years old for training in behavior therapy before prescribing ADHD medicine".

You may interpret this as them saying behavior therapy and supervised play is the first line of treatment for ADHD kids, but I read it as saying This behavior therapy will help with the outbursts but when the kid reaches school age switch to medication.

As I have stated, my son wasn't diagnosed until 8th grade, but he did play often. I see two scenarios, either play did not help him at all, or play assisted him in hiding his ADHD from the world and me. In either case I'm not thinking we should advertise that play is a treatment for ADHD.

Play assisted your son in hiding his ADHD from the world and you?

Same thing happens when I take medication.

Medication hides my ADHD, until the medication wares off.

Daily supervised free play has hid my stepson's ADHD, so much so, that he has never needed to take medication.

If had known better, I would have stopped supervised free playing, so that he could be more impaired and take medication.







M

mildadhd
07-31-17, 11:18 AM
Also, as I pointed out in an earlier post, it seems to be very difficult to find
places that offer parent training for this.

I am glad you found a good play therapist for your family member who has been going to play therapy for over the last ten years.

While I certainly do not discourage going to a play therapist.

I think there are a tonne of early developmental needs that can be directly and indirectly promoted at home/neighbourhood through supervised free play without the parenting figure possibly even knowing it.



M

mildadhd
07-31-17, 12:01 PM
The contradictions throughout this thread make me worry about taking and promoting very powerful pharmaceutical brain altering treatments on line.

When I cannot even promote instinctual supervised free play during the early period of development, years before pharmaceutical treatment is even an option.

When brain researchers have found supervised free play promotes healthy development in the same brain areas that are slightly delayed in people with ADHD.

When doctors recommend behavior therapy before the age of 4-6.

When I made it clear that I was not anti medication, but focusing on discussing a period of early development before medication was even an option.


M

namazu
07-31-17, 12:22 PM
When I cannot even promote instinctual supervised free play during the early period of development, years before pharmaceutical treatment is even an option.
No one has stopped you from promoting supervised free play, which you've done in many threads across the forum.

Some people, like the OP of this thread, have endorsed play as a strategy for managing ADHD. (And for what it's worth, the OP's youngest child is already 10 years old.)

Other people have suggested that their (or their kids') experiences with free play have not resolved or noticeably improved their (or their kids') ADHD symptoms.

Their experiences may be different from yours, and that's OK.

It doesn't mean that free play isn't a good thing for children (or adults). Just that, even if it's beneficial, it's not a cure-all for everyone.

mildadhd
07-31-17, 12:54 PM
It doesn't mean that free play isn't a good thing for children (or adults). Just that, even if it's beneficial, it's not a cure-all for everyone.


Free play is primary instinctual social emotional behavior

Now I am focusing on supervised free play, not just free play.

I am focusing on treatment during the stages in early development when children love to play, before medication is even an option.

Why are you focusing on a cure-all for everyone in a response to my post?












M

Lunacie
07-31-17, 01:04 PM
Free play is primary instinctual social emotional behavior

Now I am focusing on supervised free play, not just free play.






M

Perhaps you could explain what you see as the difference between "just free
play" and "supervised free play."

My adhd granddaughter had much the same parental supervision and same
opportunity for free play that her mom had, but the differences were huge.

My granddaughter beat herself up emotionally, despite reassurance from us.
She would argue with anything and everything that was talked about. Once
she began taking Concerta it was like a switch was turned on in her head
that let her make connections and suddenly understand what others were
saying ... there was no more arguing.

namazu
07-31-17, 01:27 PM
I am focusing on treatment during the stages in early development when children love to play, before medication is even an option
The OP's child is already 10 years old.

The OP wanted to know about people's experiences with play for (possibly older) children with ADHD:

I am a mom of two, and my younger son (10) has many symptoms of ADHD, though he has not been diagnosed.

[...]

I read a great book, Playdhd, by Dr. Kirsten Milliken that has helped me look at play as a resource. Though this book has a focus on adults with ADHD, the suggestions work for any age. Play is so important – and she has some great ideas and suggestions on how to be more playful to help manage ADHD.

Anyone else used Play as a treatment? Have you seen a difference in your child's behavior? Does it smooth out the tough times?

mildadhd
07-31-17, 01:28 PM
Perhaps you could explain what you see as the difference between "just free
play" and "supervised free play."

My adhd granddaughter had much the same parental supervision and same
opportunity for free play that her mom had, but the differences were huge.

My granddaughter beat herself up emotionally, despite reassurance from us.
She would argue with anything and everything that was talked about. Once
she began taking Concerta it was like a switch was turned on in her head
that let her make connections and suddenly understand what others were
saying ... there was no more arguing.

I am focusing on treatment before medication is an even an option, and you are focusing on treatment after medication becomes an option, in a response to my post?



M

mildadhd
07-31-17, 01:42 PM
The OP's child is already 10 years old.

The OP's asked about our experiences in regards to behavior, treating ADHD and Play, Negative self talk, etc..

My relative and I both have trouble focusing since early childhood, about the age of 10 we started making each other laugh when one of us was feeling down, by telling each other, "not to worry we are "smurt"".









m

namazu
07-31-17, 01:57 PM
The OP's asked about our experiences in regards to behavior, treating ADHD and Play, Negative self talk, etc..

My relative and I both have trouble focusing since early childhood, about the age of 10 we started making each other laugh, by telling each other, "not to worry we are "smurt"".
That sounds like it would lighten the mood! :) Did joking around like that help you focus at all, or relieve some anxiety?

Your story about "smurt" reminds me a bit of this:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tcGQpjCztgA
:D

It sounds like the OP and her son use similar joking-around to reduce stressful situations.

mildadhd
07-31-17, 02:22 PM
Developmental effects of partly relieving daily anxiety at age 10, after AD(H)D emerges. (maybe lessen severity of top down commoribbitites.)

vs

Developmental effects of partly relieving daily anxiety at age 1, before AD(H)D emerges. (maybe lessen severity of AD(H)D.)




M

Lunacie
07-31-17, 02:30 PM
I am focusing on treatment before medication is an even an option, and you are focusing on treatment after medication becomes an option, in a response to my post?



M

Sorry you didn't understand my point.

Free play didn't help my granddaughter, but meds did.
She wasn't diagnosed and medicated until she was 10 or 11.



Earlier I commented that I've tried making things more fun, having an
attitude that is lighter and more fun. For a time it worked with the GD with
autism and I was able to take over bathing and hair washing. I do not know
and she is unable to explain what made her decide to have mom help instead.


PS ... I requested the book the OP mentioned from our library loan system
a few weeks ago and have still not received it. I may have to re-request it?

mildadhd
07-31-17, 02:45 PM
It's something that comes naturally to me, and at times it has worked with my
grandkids but for some reason my autistic granddaughter has decided that I'm
trying to manipulate her when I try to lighten things up with humor.

Really, I guess it worked best when the girls were little. Once they hit their pre-
teens they change in so many ways.

She's been seeing a therapist for 10 years (different one before that) who
specializes in play-therapy, and he's been very helpful for all of us.

I'm glad her therapist for 10 years who specializes in play-therapy has been so helpful.




M

mildadhd
07-31-17, 02:53 PM
Parental supervision in addition to free play, is a fun way to promote the essential emotional attachment and attunement relationships, required for healthy bottom up development of implicit self-regulation, (relieves anxiety/depression) years before ADHD emerges and medication is even a treatment option.



M

sarahsweets
08-01-17, 07:26 AM
So then are you saying that medicating at an early age should not be done before playing?As in, playing should be the option first before medication? What if both work? That was my experience. Mommy and me classes and preschool with medication helped save my son's life.

mildadhd
08-01-17, 09:58 AM
So then are you saying that medicating at an early age should not be done before playing?

As in, playing should be the option first before medication?

What if both work? That was my experience.

Mommy and me classes and preschool with medication helped save my son's life.

Between birth and the age of 4.

Supervised free play.

The child leads and the parenting-figure makes sure the child is safe, for a period of time everyday.

Promotes a whole bunch of things.


m

mildadhd
08-01-17, 10:17 AM
My stepson and I have played with a few friends who have autism at the park.

We have a small plastic-cloth football filled with cotton, that never hurts if we miss the ball and get hit in the face.

It's the perfect ball.




M