View Full Version : Seeking honest and possible professional advice (WARNING: this is a long post)


Joey3537
06-28-17, 03:26 PM
Hi everyone, first time here and hoping to get some advice. Normally I would seek out a therapist for help, but my insurance sucks and I can't find a provider that has Psychology as primary focus... so here I am!

About me - My name is Joey (hi again! :o) I am a 26 years old male. I am a high school graduate attending a community college in California.

Medical History - I am currently on Vyvanse (50 mg) since November 2016, I have also been on Welbutrin, but stopped since taking Vyvanse. I was diagnosed with ADD after talking to a therapist for other reasons and told me to seek a doctor for medicine. (unable to talk to this therapist anymore)

PS: If you know a license Therapist who is willing to take a look at this, I would be VERY grateful.


Pre-medication conditions -

Example 1: I was unable to read a book without my eyes getting very heavy. I was unable to read and understand what I was reading. Felt like I was just saying words without meaning.

Example 2: I was unable to solve logical equations as I would often forget what I was told right when I was told. I had to right everything down and I mean everything.

Example 3: Remembering anything. Usually in one ear and out the other. I have to be told 3 or more time, or I would have to make a mistake and then figure things out by myself.


On Vyvanse -

Example 1: I can read a book and stay focused on a conversation without my eyes getting droopy. I don't get bored easily and can stay focused.

Example 2: My memory still sucks. I still can hardly remember anything anyone tells me and I can't really remember what I read.

Example 3: I still don't like to do anything that requires a lot of thinking, as I still loose interest quickly, but I'm focused regardless.


How I live my life today -


I can't keep a steady job (even on Vyvanse) because I can't remember things very well and often have to be told over and over again.

I can't keep a ready relationship because I loose interest too quickly.

I don't have any hobbies because I loose interest in everything I do too quickly.

It often times takes me longer to do most things than it takes other people because I over-think everything.

I do very poorly when making logical decisions, like giving change in my head.



Thank you so much for reading! I means more than you know. I just want some help and some honest sincere advice. I don't know if I'm on the right meds or even if meds are the answer.





Below I'm going to talk about my educational background, as it might perhaps help some of you understand me better and give some better advice.


My Educational background -

I have grown up in a very strict religious hose hold. I had a terrible educational experience as I went to a private school that had only 30 students. I had a "teacher" that had no patience that stayed my teacher from 2nd -7th grade. I was overwhelmed with school worked constantly and had to often stay after school sometimes until 5:00pm. i had give up most of recess breaks and often only had lunch long enough to eat and then had to go back inside and work, while others were able to eat. The reason for no breaks and staying after was because I was so far behind in my work that my "teacher" only way to get me caught up was to have me work. I was given hours worth of homework that never got completely done. I had to do Saturday school and Summer school.

Yes, it was a horrible experience and I was enrolled because my mom didn't want me to be held back..., and even today, after all the crying and stress I went though, my mom still says it was the best thing for me. (she's a good women, i promise, but confused lol)

When I was taken out of the school and placed in a public school because of the lack of funding that the private school had (I wonder why), I was placed into resource classes through my high school years because of my poor assessment tests.

I feel like I lost out on a lot of essential education growing up.

So today I can't spell anything without spell check. The only way I spell things out is by remember how I spelled it before. I am a very poor reader as well and often times have to ask for help when reading a big word.

Fuzzy12
06-28-17, 03:43 PM
You won't get professional.advice here though honest is possible. For professional advice you need to see a professional, ie a psychiatrist .

I might have missed it but what exactly are you seeking advice on?

Joey3537
06-28-17, 04:05 PM
Thank you Fuzzy12, for your reply. I am actually seeing a psychiatrist for medication, but he told me that's all he can do for me is give me medication. If I want to explore my condition I would have to see a therapist and that's where It becomes difficult as I can't find someone who accepts my insurance... and I can't get better insurance because I can't get a job long enough and bla bla bla.

I suppose I was asking for some advice on anything that could be helpful in my situation.

Johnny Slick
06-28-17, 05:18 PM
Yeah, I think anybody here attempting to give you advice that goes beyond our own personal experiences would be doing you a grave disservice. None of us are doctors and none of us have spent the hours around you that is kind of necessary to figure a lot of these things out.

The fact that the Vyvanse makes a difference does tell me that there is probably an issue in your brain at least tangentially related to ADHD. A lot of people who don't really have it or have to take too much of it complain that they turn into unfeeling "robots" or else just get high off of the amphetamine aspect of ADHD meds. The other stuff, though, sounds like you might have some sort of learning disability above and beyond the ADHD. Actually, I'm in a class with a young woman who I think has something similar. I can't for the life of me remember the name but it's similar to dyslexia, just with the spoken word. Sadly I don't think there's medication that will just, like, suddenly cure it the way there sometimes is with ADHD, but it's something to look into and make plans for if you've got it.

Otherwise, if verbal instructions are not something that you process well, figure out ways to get around that if you can, I guess. I mean, if you're like the rest of us here, you're probably already doing a lot of things like that, so I'm not sure how much I can add onto that except to say that you ought to be aware of what you're doing it and why you do it (and also that playing to your own strengths and away from your weaknesses doesn't make you lazy or stupid). Again, a therapist would be the ideal person to talk with about this kind of thing.

sarahsweets
06-29-17, 08:03 AM
I think getting evaluated for a learning disability would be good for you to consider.

TangledWebs
06-29-17, 12:46 PM
Thank you Fuzzy12, for your reply. I am actually seeing a psychiatrist for medication, but he told me that's all he can do for me is give me medication. If I want to explore my condition I would have to see a therapist and that's where It becomes difficult as I can't find someone who accepts my insurance... and I can't get better insurance because I can't get a job long enough and bla bla bla.

I suppose I was asking for some advice on anything that could be helpful in my situation.

Perhaps you need to increase your Vyvanse in order to hold a job? What kind of insurance do you have? I also live in California. I was on free health insurance before I married and was able to find a therapist without a problem.

kilted_scotsman
06-30-17, 07:15 AM
I don't know the situation in the US, but over here we have Low Cost Counselling Services. LCCS' use trainee and volunteer therapists to deliver short term 6-20 sessions of therapy using whatever type of therapy the volunteer has trained in.

Talk therapy is useful, and one reason it can be beneficial is that it moves away from the medical model where one powerful person "knows" how to fix the "broken" patient. Interestingly many therapy models in use today had self-help type beginnings, often with groups of people getting together to increase their awareness of themselves through sharing ideas and insights that can from talking through their lives.

My advice would be to work on the one thing that is currently hindering your access to information..... your reading and writing ability. read, read, read and do more reading. Move towards reading psychology self-help type stuff. Even if you get therapy, growth relies on being able to access more information outside the therapy process so that you're not dependant on the therapist to tell you things.

Go to workshops and events around this stuff..... this is to gain more info, but also to build a group of contacts who are also trying to grow, These people can point you in the direction of more resources that might help you.

Move away from your home area by going and living "in community" through charitable work... this can be a very useful way of getting contact with people who are questioning both themselves and how their society works.

The underlying theme of this is to move away from the mindset where someone else has to fix you..... to a place where you are using what would have been your co-pay to seek out positive and growthful activities. Given your background this will be hard, but my experience has been that there are lots of people out there willing to help for low cost, or for free. It's just that they don't come with letters after their name and tend to expect you to the heavy lifting.....

It will be difficult and sometimes painful..... but therapy is the same, just much more expensive!

Joey3537
07-04-17, 06:26 PM
Thank you all very much for your words of understanding. It's very refreshing to be actually encouraged to seek help, and not just be told that I need to find my "click".

And Kilted_scotsman, the idea of living in a society that accepts people with a learning disability would be my heaven on earth. I don't know of anywhere that I could find here like that here in the United States, but I'll keep my eyes open haha.

As far as working goes, it's very discouraging to tell my co-workers that I have a learning disability, as I am sure some of you are aware of. I don't want to be thought of as undependable or seen any less than anyone else.

Until I find a therapist, all I can do is go really slow and wright everything down. I've gone this far in life learning that it's better to go slow and ask questions over and over again, and just hope and pray they have patience with me.

TangledWebs, I have got MediCal, so you should understand my hardship. It was hell to even find a Psychologist that doesn't think I'm just another person who is just looking to get high. (this is a good story for another time). I will talk to my doctor about this suggestion the next time I see him, but even even mentioned that sometimes medication can only do so much.

Joey3537
07-04-17, 06:31 PM
Yeah, I think anybody here attempting to give you advice that goes beyond our own personal experiences would be doing you a grave disservice. None of us are doctors and none of us have spent the hours around you that is kind of necessary to figure a lot of these things out.

The fact that the Vyvanse makes a difference does tell me that there is probably an issue in your brain at least tangentially related to ADHD. A lot of people who don't really have it or have to take too much of it complain that they turn into unfeeling "robots" or else just get high off of the amphetamine aspect of ADHD meds. The other stuff, though, sounds like you might have some sort of learning disability above and beyond the ADHD. Actually, I'm in a class with a young woman who I think has something similar. I can't for the life of me remember the name but it's similar to dyslexia, just with the spoken word. Sadly I don't think there's medication that will just, like, suddenly cure it the way there sometimes is with ADHD, but it's something to look into and make plans for if you've got it.

Otherwise, if verbal instructions are not something that you process well, figure out ways to get around that if you can, I guess. I mean, if you're like the rest of us here, you're probably already doing a lot of things like that, so I'm not sure how much I can add onto that except to say that you ought to be aware of what you're doing it and why you do it (and also that playing to your own strengths and away from your weaknesses doesn't make you lazy or stupid). Again, a therapist would be the ideal person to talk with about this kind of thing.


Did you happen to remember? My symptoms seem to relate closely to Dyscalculia. Does that sound about right?