View Full Version : Emotional Intelligence


Free to Fly
07-07-17, 12:00 PM
As I continue to work on learning to be in a relationship, I find reference to Emotional Intelligence. Reading thru the usual internet stuff I find the following tip.....(and I think maybe I am not gonna make it better.)

Slow down (or meditate): Emotions have a habit of getting the most out of control when we donít have time to slow down or process them.

Really....hahahaha. crud.

sarahsweets
07-07-17, 12:48 PM
My ideas about emotional intelligence are that you are really good at "getting" people and have an uncanny knack for empathy, compassion and listening to others. A very Namaste way of life.

WheresMyMind
07-07-17, 04:58 PM
My ideas about emotional intelligence are that you are really good at "getting" people and have an uncanny knack for empathy, compassion and listening to others. A very Namaste way of life.

That's how I "get" it, too. I prefer not to think of it as an uncanny knack, because it's rather difficult to learn an uncanny knack, and I hope I can improve my EQ (Emotional Quotient).

I'm immersing myself in writings and lectures by the Dalai Lama and Dr. Paul Ekman, who have probably created the most completely-defined explanation of emotions (and the physiological manifestations they often trigger, known as "affects").

I like the reference to Namaste - which means "I bow to the divine in you". How better to express my desire to understand another's emotions.


WMM

someothertime
07-08-17, 04:51 AM
i get the phrase. but i'd hate to live in a world that had no "emotionally un-intelligent" people......

i could be wrong... but scholarly EI, vs spiritual EI.... are different?

Unmanagable
07-08-17, 08:29 AM
I'd be curious to know just how accurately such things can even be measured by those who do the measuring, especially considering the depths of emotional dysregulation that comes with the territory of adhd and other various issues. Yet another thing that makes me go hmmmm...

Free to Fly
07-09-17, 05:34 PM
I have to find some way to quit walking all over other people. I have been likened to the proverbial bull in the china shop. Good intentions, but lots of collateral damage.

Has anyone accepted the tenets of E.I. and worked it into making their life better?

mildadhd
07-09-17, 05:34 PM
People who know a lot about emotions are emotionally intelligent.

Example, Jaak Panksepp and Temple Grandin.

Temple Grandin draws extensively on Panksepp's work in describing how an appreciation of the primal emotions of PLAY, PANIC/GRIEF, FEAR, RAGE, SEEKING, LUST and CARE and what triggers them can improve human care of stock animals and the welfare of companion animals

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jaak_Panksepp



M

mildadhd
07-10-17, 01:34 PM
I'd be curious to know just how accurately such things can even be measured by those who do the measuring, especially considering the depths of emotional dysregulation that comes with the territory of adhd and other various issues. Yet another thing that makes me go hmmmm...

I love this question.

I have been reading about ways some affective neuroscientists measure things.

I would like to better learn about the different ways neuroscientists "measure" brain functions?

Is there a specific area of brain functioning your interested in learning how to measure?

The brain functioning is complex in general, but it is less complex, if we start with emotional brain functions common in all mammals including humans.




M

Unmanagable
07-10-17, 11:47 PM
I love this question.

I have been reading about ways some affective neuroscientists measure things.

I would like to better learn about the different ways neuroscientists "measure" brain functions?

Is there a specific area of brain functioning your interested in learning how to measure?

The brain functioning is complex in general, but it is less complex, if we start with emotional brain functions common in all mammals including humans.




M

Complex, indeed. I'm always appreciative of folks who can break things down into layman's terms and offer a cliff notes version.

The self-worth and empathy areas continue to intrigue me, but I haven't read much as they relate specifically to the brain, yet.

I'm also fascinated by things like the following, but am the first to admit I don't feel I have a deep enough understanding, nor have I done enough technical in depth research about any of it, to engage in scientific discussion:

http://jem.rupress.org/content/212/7/991.full

Our data indicated filling of the dura mater lymphatic vessels after intraparenchymal injection of the tracer and the lack thereof in the K14-VEGFR3-Ig TG mice.

This suggests a model in which a part of the brain ISF, downstream of the glymphatic system, is cleared directly from the subarachnoid space as CSF into the dura mater lymphatic vasculature.

Interestingly, we also observed lymphatic vessels draining out of the skull along the dura mater of cranial nerves. Furthermore, we observed lymphatic vessels crossing the cribriform plate, which may explain some of the previous observations.

Because of the lack of other known direct anatomical connections between the CSF space and extracranial lymphatic vessels, the dura mater lymphatic vessels are likely to represent the most important CSF source for the extracranial lymph compartment.

The importance of understanding the mechanisms of brain waste management are highlighted in patients suffering from Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative diseases characterized by the pathological accumulation of misfolded proteins, such as amyloid β, into the brain parenchyma (Deane et al., 2008 (http://jem.rupress.org/content/212/7/991.full#ref-5); Huang and Mucke, 2012 (http://jem.rupress.org/content/212/7/991.full#ref-10)).

In other tissues, lymphatic vessels are critical for the absorption of macromolecules (Tammela and Alitalo, 2010 (http://jem.rupress.org/content/212/7/991.full#ref-31)). In the brain under physiological conditions, a major part of the cerebral amyloid β is removed by the transvascular route (Zlokovic, 2011 (http://jem.rupress.org/content/212/7/991.full#ref-37); Zhao et al., 2015 (http://jem.rupress.org/content/212/7/991.full#ref-36)).

However, recent evidence suggests that the glymphatic system may also be key in amyloid β clearance (Iliff et al., 2012 (http://jem.rupress.org/content/212/7/991.full#ref-12)). The present data show that the absence of dura mater lymphatic drainage results in inhibited clearance of OVA from the brain interstitium, suggesting that dura mater lymphatic vessels are critical for the absorption of macromolecules from the brain ISF and CSF.

Importantly, these findings open new avenues for research. Several other potential roles of dura mater lymphatic vessels can be envisioned, such as in the trafficking of cerebral immune cells, in antigen presentation in the dcLNs, and in the clearance of brain edema.

These data may also explain why primary brain tumors can rarely metastasize into cervical LNs (Mondin et al., 2010 (http://jem.rupress.org/content/212/7/991.full#ref-22)). Interestingly, surgical removal of the dcLN results in cognitive impairment in mice (Radjavi et al., 2014 (http://jem.rupress.org/content/212/7/991.full#ref-28)), and ligation of the deep cervical lymphatic vessels has been reported to aggravate cerebral ischemia after stroke by increasing brain water edema and infarction volume in rats (Si et al., 2006 (http://jem.rupress.org/content/212/7/991.full#ref-30)).

Further studies should be conducted to define the full contribution of dura mater lymphatic vasculature in CNS homeostasis and disease.