View Full Version : I hate ADHD and I hate Dyscalculia


finallyfound10
07-18-17, 01:18 PM
I also hate Statistics and that I have to take it to get a BSN where I will never use it.

I had fleeting thoughts of trying to find someone to take the rest of this completely online class for me. That's unethical and cheating! I don't have the guts to do it which is a good thing. I guess my moral compass is still somewhat intact, at least in this area.

Along with ALL of my other issues and negative goings on in my life, this class is pushing to my emotional limit.

:mad::(:eek:Save

namazu
07-18-17, 01:35 PM
Yay, moral compass!

You might actually need to calculate something someday as a nurse -- accurately. If you can't do it mentally, find a way to work around or accommodate this -- apps or calculators, "cheat sheets" (not for academic work, but to refer to for common calculations/conversions), etc.

Understanding statistics is important for general numerical literacy. Like, understanding and evaluating risks (including risks of medical conditions and drug side effects), and polls, and other stuff that comes up frequently in life.

When I had to take stats (1+ years of it!) it helped me to focus more on explaining things in words than in symbols, because I tend to transpose symbols and confuse myself.

(Not so helpful when they want me to calculate the probability of finding a blue M&M or how many different types of sandwich I can make with 3 types of bread and 4 sandwich fillings and 4 condiments. Words were useful for other stuff, like understanding confidence intervals and numbers needed to treat and other such things.)

Have you looked at Khan Academy? They have free educational videos covering lots of mathy and sciency topics (including stats) in short chunks. Might be helpful to see the stuff explained a different way.

Is there any online tutoring or "office hours" offered?

Your cheering section is cheering you on! Go finallyfound!

Hyperman87
07-19-17, 01:10 PM
yeah me too:(:goodpost:

finallyfound10
07-21-17, 09:52 AM
Yay, moral compass!

You might actually need to calculate something someday as a nurse -- accurately. If you can't do it mentally, find a way to work around or accommodate this -- apps or calculators, "cheat sheets" (not for academic work, but to refer to for common calculations/conversions), etc.

Understanding statistics is important for general numerical literacy. Like, understanding and evaluating risks (including risks of medical conditions and drug side effects), and polls, and other stuff that comes up frequently in life.

When I had to take stats (1+ years of it!) it helped me to focus more on explaining things in words than in symbols, because I tend to transpose symbols and confuse myself.

(Not so helpful when they want me to calculate the probability of finding a blue M&M or how many different types of sandwich I can make with 3 types of bread and 4 sandwich fillings and 4 condiments. Words were useful for other stuff, like understanding confidence intervals and numbers needed to treat and other such things.)

Have you looked at Khan Academy? They have free educational videos covering lots of mathy and sciency topics (including stats) in short chunks. Might be helpful to see the stuff explained a different way.

Is there any online tutoring or "office hours" offered?

Your cheering section is cheering you on! Go finallyfound!

THANK YOU Namazu!!!!

No, I won't hire someone to take the rest for me. The guilt would be worse than how I feel now.

There is a math called "dosage calculations" that most nursing schools give every semester and schools give about 2 chances to take it and if a nursing student can't then they are out of the program.

It is very, very rare that an RN needs to use it on the job due to the pharmacy printing what the RN needs to know on the packaging, the Medication section of the charting computer program such as in Epic and Cerner telling the RN what is needed as well as the towers loaded with the controlled meds such as Pyxis, Accudose and Omnicell showing the RN important dosing information too.

All of the being said, just 2 days ago I needed to give an IV med using a syringe that came packaged in mcg/ml and the ordered dose was 12.5 mcg/ml. If it were giving it using "smart pump" I would not have to do anything put press the correct buttons and hit start. BUT since it was given by hand, I had to convert mcg to mg then figure out how many mg/ml to give. Since I do it so rarely, it took some time but got it figured out!!

I've used Khan Academy and everything else on the web as resources! I went to tutoring at the school and it was helpful but since I have no real foundation since we aren't being taught, it made it difficult.

finally