View Full Version : Can medication help?


gabe198428
07-20-17, 04:24 PM
Hello, fellow ADDers. I'll try to make this short and simple, be as clear as I can. What I am really looking for is hearing other people's experiences with stimulants and how it has helped in their day-day life. This site is a great resource to gain some insight into my condition, however, because of it, I forget most of what I read and can't pay attention long enough to stay on it. No, that last part isn't an ADD joke. That's what I deal with everyday. It's very..... upsetting. When I was in public school, the complaints were that I am not motivated enough to complete schoolwork, I am lazy, etc, etc. Most of this I am sure you can relate to because you probably had IEP reports. Keep in mind, this was mostly said about me in High School, when I took myself off stimulants due to self-esteem issues. The biggest regret of my life, (one of them anyway) was turning to pot instead of staying on a stimulant. I see now how damaging it was to my mental health and overall cognitive functioning. I beat myself up a lot over the years, punishing myself by getting high because I felt useless and worthless. I knew what the pot was doing to my mental health; I didn't care enough to change anything.

I can really relate to those who struggle to form personal relationships because of how spacey and inattentive they are. I can't remember who the person was, but one person said something about how down he gets whenever he thinks about forming an intimate relationship with someone. From what I gathered, it's because of his inattentiveness that stands in the way,

"....Can't give her the best of myself...."

I face that with someone I have an interest in as well. However, I've come to feel as though even if I were medicated and able to engage more in a conversation with someone, the daily grind of living is going to stand in the way. Right now, I just want to earn a living, function at a higher level, get my ****in' life back! I have my own dark views on sex and relationships, and for the person who wrote what I referenced, here's a message for you: It's not worth getting close to anyone in that way. You will get hurt in the end, used. That's my limited experience.

Currently, finding a doctor to take me seriously has been a challenge. Because I have insurance through Medicaid, these doctors in the hospital setting have very little knowledge about ADD. I feel as though they keep misdiagnosing me, willfully dismissing the possibility that my symptoms mimic other psychiatric disorders. I don't have racing thoughts, my thoughts just wander too much, like constantly switching channels on the TV. I am not depressed, per se. In my opinion, and take that how you want, I think depression stems from being too self aware about the world and people-- seeing the dark side to our existence. I don't buy into the biological basis of it, whereas in ADD, I do believe there actually is faulty wiring in the brain that causes people to be less attentive, more so than the average person. The great mystery is why, and does medication actually help?

Thanks for reading. Hope to hear how medication has helped you function more.



P.S. As part of my symptoms, what frustrates me is how when I am listening to someone talk, it feels like a major hurdle to follow what they're saying. That's the best way I can put it. I am sure that my poor eye contact is the result of being overly stimulated. It's like I am looking all around me because I am heavily distracted, unable to really focus on what the person is talking about by maintaining eye contact. I can't tell you how many people criticized me for that, taking my behaviors for something that it is not.

sarahsweets
07-21-17, 05:02 AM
The biggest regret of my life, (one of them anyway) was turning to pot instead of staying on a stimulant. I see now how damaging it was to my mental health and overall cognitive functioning. I beat myself up a lot over the years, punishing myself by getting high because I felt useless and worthless. I knew what the pot was doing to my mental health; I didn't care enough to change anything.

Have you stopped smoking pot?
I am not depressed, per se. In my opinion, and take that how you want, I think depression stems from being too self aware about the world and people-- seeing the dark side to our existence. I don't buy into the biological basis of it, whereas in ADD, I do believe there actually is faulty wiring in the brain that causes people to be less attentive, more so than the average person. The great mystery is why, and does medication actually help?
Why would you say that depression has no biological basis? The evidence as been there that it does for a long time. You say you do believe in a biological basis for adhd but not depression? If anything, the evidence that adhd is biological would be harder to find then the evidence about depression. I am not saying adhd isnt physiological or biological, just that depression and its hereditbility and basis has more evidence proving that to be true.
I wont say I am offended that you would dismiss depression but that maybe you should have an open mind about it.

Medication saved my life. it was like all my life I had been climbing the summit of a mountain with no oxygen mask and then stimulants gave me that oxygen to make the climb possible.
They dont work for everyone but they work for alot of us.

finallyfound10
07-22-17, 07:34 PM
Sarah made excellent points.

I have ADHD- Inattentive but still tried Concerta and Vyvanse combined with various anti-depressants. I'm now on Strattera (a non-stim) and Wellbutin and this is the best I've felt in years. Granted, I'm not feeling great but I'm still working several issues out.

I was on Medicaid and able to get the meds I needed then I forgot to re-apply and lost my appeal, I was able to get free Concerta from the Johnson and Johnson Patient Assistance Program. I am sure that all of the Big Pharmas have those programs.

these doctors in the hospital setting have very little knowledge about ADD

Do you mean an inpatient psychiatric setting and/or inpatient medical setting? In the medical setting the docs wouldn't want to start anyone on anything except what they were admitted for and the psychiatrists should do a formal assessment if it could be part of the reason you were admitted to the psychiatric unit or refer you to someone when outpatient services are being set up.

If you are not inpatient see what services are available through Medicaid to get tested. If you are unemployed or underemployed OVR is a great resource and you can get evaluated for ADHD through them.

Good Luck!!

PoppnNSailinMan
07-22-17, 11:02 PM
Currently, finding a doctor to take me seriously has been a challenge. Because I have insurance through Medicaid, these doctors in the hospital setting have very little knowledge about ADD. I feel as though they keep misdiagnosing me, willfully dismissing the possibility that my symptoms mimic other psychiatric disorders.

Unfortunately, a lot of medical and mental health professionals (and that includes a lot of psychiatrists) don't have much training in treating and diagnosing ADHD. I just got a new book that came out this year by Thomas Brown, one of the top ADHD specialists in the country, Outside the Box: Rethinking ADD/ADHD in Children and Adults - A Practical Guide (Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Association Publishing, 2017) and he says on page xx:

Assumption #14: Most medical and mental health professionals are trained to diagnose and treat ADHD effectively. Facts: Most medical and mental health professionals, including psychologists, psychiatrists, and other physicians, have had very little or no professional training in assessment or treatment of ADHD, especially in adolescents and adults. Some have developed proficiency by getting extra training for ADHD, but currently, this is the exception, not the rule.

I've had a hard time finding someone who I feel is really competent to treat me, too, and it's only within the last few weeks that I finally got referred by my primary care doctor to someone who has really educated himself with the most recent and up-to-date literature on treating ADHD in adults. I'm really lucky to have found him since he's part of a "specialty care center" that is nevertheless willing to accept patients like me who are on Medicaid.

So hopefully with a little perseverance, you can find someone who is competent to treat your ADHD, too, who will take Medicaid.

someothertime
07-22-17, 11:55 PM
Finding any sort of support group, mentoring, close personal supportive friend with regular scheduled meetings or activities would be a huge help to those in your position.

Half of our obstacles an getting help are undertaking actions...... which if separated from personal mentality as undertakings that we need to sort out....... would mean so many of us in the world would be much more on top of our largest hurdle which holds us under water when we've been treading undefinately.....

The decision to reach the shore is the right one...... at the same time....... seeking that out alone, when we have been treading and can continue to do so..... seems, and often is perilous..... But if others are with us....... the task is redefined.

PoppnNSailinMan
07-23-17, 01:34 AM
Finding any sort of support group, mentoring, close personal supportive friend with regular scheduled meetings or activities would be a huge help to those in your position.

Five years ago when I was initially diagnosed with ADHD, I really wanted to find some sort of support group for adults with ADHD but the closest one I could find was a couple of hours drive away. I recently discovered a pdf instruction booklet put together by Ari Tuckman that can be downloaded at the website of the Attention Deficit Disorder Association (ADDA) that tells how to set up an ADHD support group. So I'm thinking of trying to set up a support group for adults with ADHD in the area where I live so that others here, especially those who are newly diagnosed, won't feel as hopeless as I was feeling sometimes five years ago. The link to the pdf for this ADDA Support Group Manual can be found at the link below:

https://add.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/ADHD_Group_Instruction_Manual.pdf

gabe198428
07-30-17, 04:14 PM
I guess because of my own experiences, I look at depression a little differently. I didn't feel any better when I was placed on them, still had attention and concentration problems. As for the pot, yes I have quit, with no intentions of ever using again. I really do mean that.

For me, the biggest change I want to see is the ability to sit down and read or view material for long periods of time. From the people I've spoken to directly, plus the comments that I've seen over the internet, one of the biggest benefits is memory recall. It does seem to improve, however minimal it is.

Little Missy
07-30-17, 04:32 PM
Have you made your appointment yet?

gabe198428
07-30-17, 04:43 PM
".......In the medical setting the docs wouldn't want to start anyone on anything except what they were admitted for......"

Yeah, I picked up on that a while ago. I won't get into detail about why I ended up there a little over a month ago. The problem with these inpatient facilities is that the doctors don't have a lot of time to really investigate a patient's past. After 5 or 10 minutes, they think they have gathered enough information to diagnose someone. Because I am currently facing a legal issue with my neighbor, which I hope will lead to a lawsuit if I can get the charges dropped after completing this substance abuse program, the psychiatrist I saw at the inpatient unit forgot one of the basic rules of mental health disorders-- it can not be triggered by illegal drugs. Meaning this, the onset of the illness needs to happen on its own, not masked by drug use. This quack forgot that, plus.........

**** him. The important thing is that I got out of there, which I hope to use against my accusers when the time comes. That said, I've noticed a huge drop in my energy levels once I discontinued the risperdal. These damn doctors I tell you. They keep giving me the wrong drug! I tried Strattera before, all it did was knock me out and put me to sleep. I think I'd respond well to stimulants.

As for me, I have a few options left, all of which will take time, and that's something I don't have. Next doctor that I see, one proposal is keeping a daily log and then showing him or her the time and dates that I took the drug. This way, everyone wins. I get the medicine that I need, and they don't think I'll die from an overdose or end up in jail. I am thinking of seeing a PCP instead. If I don't disclose my drug history, they'll prescribe it for me, considering how I have documented proof of ADHD. These other clowns who call themselves doctors ignore that part.

Good Luck to everyone.

gabe198428
07-30-17, 04:53 PM
I have an appointment coming up in two days at this one place. The problem is that I have to see a therapist four times in a month before I see anyone. Tomorrow I am going to call the few private doctors who take my insurance and hope they accept anyone, or that my insurance didn't forget to delete them from their network.

sarahsweets
07-31-17, 07:06 AM
".......In the medical setting the docs wouldn't want to start anyone on anything except what they were admitted for......"

Yeah, I picked up on that a while ago. I won't get into detail about why I ended up there a little over a month ago. The problem with these inpatient facilities is that the doctors don't have a lot of time to really investigate a patient's past. After 5 or 10 minutes, they think they have gathered enough information to diagnose someone. Because I am currently facing a legal issue with my neighbor, which I hope will lead to a lawsuit if I can get the charges dropped after completing this substance abuse program, the psychiatrist I saw at the inpatient unit forgot one of the basic rules of mental health disorders-- it can not be triggered by illegal drugs. Meaning this, the onset of the illness needs to happen on its own, not masked by drug use. This quack forgot that, plus.........

**** him. The important thing is that I got out of there, which I hope to use against my accusers when the time comes. That said, I've noticed a huge drop in my energy levels once I discontinued the risperdal. These damn doctors I tell you. They keep giving me the wrong drug! I tried Strattera before, all it did was knock me out and put me to sleep. I think I'd respond well to stimulants.

As for me, I have a few options left, all of which will take time, and that's something I don't have. Next doctor that I see, one proposal is keeping a daily log and then showing him or her the time and dates that I took the drug. This way, everyone wins. I get the medicine that I need, and they don't think I'll die from an overdose or end up in jail. I am thinking of seeing a PCP instead. If I don't disclose my drug history, they'll prescribe it for me, considering how I have documented proof of ADHD. These other clowns who call themselves doctors ignore that part.

Good Luck to everyone.

If you are facing any sort of legal issue that is dependent on you following certain guidelines and seeing certain doctors, then seeing a new one and withholding information to get prescribed something will look really shady and seem really risky.