View Full Version : ADHD and the ketogenic diet


Amphitrite
07-25-17, 06:25 PM
Hi all,

I am just wondering if anyone has any experience with this, and if so, whether you have noticed a positive effect on your concentration, focus, etc.

I have tried the keto diet in the past, not too long ago, before I was diagnosed. I noticed a slight imorovement of my mental condition, at the time I thought, however, that it was helping my "depression", which now I realize were just my every day ADHD symptoms. It also helped me greatly with my appetite control (perhaps you have heard of the amazing appetite reducing power of the keto diet!).
Anyway, after a few months I gave it up, mostly because at the time I was still an omnivore and the constant eating of meat and dairy started to bother me. I also wasn't eating enough green veggies.
Now however, I am vegan (have been for nearly a year and a half) and today was my 7th day on keto. I am still shaking off the keto flu so I am not feeling 100% yet but I can't wait to see if there will be any significant change in my state of mind, concentration and so on, especially now, that I know what to look for.

Hope you all have a good day/night!

mildadhd
07-25-17, 08:53 PM
Keto about 10% so far.

I have been slowly trying to get use to feeling appetitive behavior.

It never occurred to me to stay hungry on purpose.




M

someothertime
07-25-17, 10:06 PM
Short answer is yes... I'd highlight some acute risks..... particularly for those with diabetes....

And also stress, exercise as a key factor if not more key than diet alone..... which would also be slightly less risky IMHO for most....

As you mention, us ADDers often find it hard to stick to routines / changes. Acute changes to diet can throw us out of whack..... ( as you also mention ).... But significantly..... can cause broader issues with health..... in effect stressing major organs / disrupting body chemistry..... and there is a high risk of causing irreprable damage when these activities are undertaken sporadically or suddenly.

Now, I do believe this area is under valued. Especially for those with medical contraindications. And would encourage more people to in general avoid sugars and caffeine and routinely exercise. For those on medications, I would urge caution and informedness..... as the complexity and experience of such changes are likely to have major impacts in how you feel/metabolise/respond to your medication.

Congrats on doing the hard work giving this a go. Stay safe and please-do report back on your progress.

stealthology
10-03-17, 10:55 AM
Hi all,

I am just wondering if anyone has any experience with this, and if so, whether you have noticed a positive effect on your concentration, focus, etc.

I have tried the keto diet in the past, not too long ago, before I was diagnosed. I noticed a slight imorovement of my mental condition, at the time I thought, however, that it was helping my "depression", which now I realize were just my every day ADHD symptoms. It also helped me greatly with my appetite control (perhaps you have heard of the amazing appetite reducing power of the keto diet!).
Anyway, after a few months I gave it up, mostly because at the time I was still an omnivore and the constant eating of meat and dairy started to bother me. I also wasn't eating enough green veggies.
Now however, I am vegan (have been for nearly a year and a half) and today was my 7th day on keto. I am still shaking off the keto flu so I am not feeling 100% yet but I can't wait to see if there will be any significant change in my state of mind, concentration and so on, especially now, that I know what to look for.

Hope you all have a good day/night!

I took Adderall and Klonopin for over 10 years. I quit 6 months ago while starting keto at the same time. Keto has been a life saver. End of story.

Short answer is yes... I'd highlight some acute risks..... particularly for those with diabetes....

And also stress, exercise as a key factor if not more key than diet alone..... which would also be slightly less risky IMHO for most....

As you mention, us ADDers often find it hard to stick to routines / changes. Acute changes to diet can throw us out of whack..... ( as you also mention ).... But significantly..... can cause broader issues with health..... in effect stressing major organs / disrupting body chemistry..... and there is a high risk of causing irreprable damage when these activities are undertaken sporadically or suddenly.

Now, I do believe this area is under valued. Especially for those with medical contraindications. And would encourage more people to in general avoid sugars and caffeine and routinely exercise. For those on medications, I would urge caution and informedness..... as the complexity and experience of such changes are likely to have major impacts in how you feel/metabolise/respond to your medication.

Congrats on doing the hard work giving this a go. Stay safe and please-do report back on your progress.

Um.. keto being harmful for diabetics? It's the other way around.

aeon
10-03-17, 11:22 AM
Um.. keto being harmful for diabetics? It's the other way around.

In general, this is true, but because we are speaking about peopleís health here, it is absolutely necessary to discuss any change with oneís clinician.

In diabetics, ketosis can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis, which can be deadly.

This is more common in Type 1 diabetics, but it can occur in Type 2 diabetics as well.

Diabetes is not just a question of carbohydrate intake, even if this is the bigger slice of the pie.

Insulin, as the main anabolic hormone in the human body, controls and regulates many things, and some of those things are disrupted by a state of ketosis, because the usual signalling pathways which modulate its activity are in a changed state or closed down.

Response to a ketogenic diet in a diabetic cannot be known beforehand, and so cannot, and should not, be recommended absent the oversight and management of the diabeticís clinician.

It isnít just about blood sugar.


Cheers,
Ian

Fraser_0762
10-03-17, 01:50 PM
There are different levels of ketosis. The ketosis you experience from a low carb diet takes weeks to occur and is minimal. Full ketosis occurs after 3-4 days of not eating anything at all and only drinking water. If diabetis is a worry, slowly break yourself into this diet by lowering your glucose intake gradually.

kkristin17
10-09-17, 11:43 PM
I'm very interested in this. I know that fasting in general can provide some great benefits for ADHD, but I find Intermittent Fasting to be more than enough dieting for me :)

stephenwmoss
10-12-17, 05:12 PM
Hello All:

My 15-year old son has AD/HD (combined), plus general "mood disorders" comorbidities. He is on Depakote, Seroquel, Lexapro and Intuniv, and I don't feel right putting all that in him morning and night. So, I was looking for information on ketosis and whether or not it would truly help with his various challenges and came across this thread during my research. Thank you all for sharing your feedback to help educate me.

As an aside, he is also overweight because of his constant carb and sugar cravings, And, now a sophomore in high school, he is becoming self-conscious about it. However, there is no way he could follow a ketogenic diet.

He wants to try a ketone drink that claims to puts you into ketosis in an hour for 2 weeks starting tomorrow. I am confident it will help with the weight loss and am now very hopeful that it will help him in many other ways.