View Full Version : I have no idea what I even want in a job!


Lothloriensgate
07-29-17, 05:39 PM
Have you ever had trouble even coming up with a job you think you are going to like? This seems to be me, and it is frustrating. Maybe I'm not taking the time to reflect enough on the question. Idk. Who can relate? And what did you do about it?

anonymouslyadd
07-29-17, 08:06 PM
Have you ever had trouble even coming up with a job you think you are going to like? This seems to be me, and it is frustrating. Maybe I'm not taking the time to reflect enough on the question. Idk. Who can relate? And what did you do about it?
I worked with an ADD coach and learned to identify what I needed to be satisfied in a job. This is very important to ADDers. Identifying needs helps to steer you in a direction that will lead to your satisfaction and overall happiness.

Use this time as an opportunity to experiment and try new things. View it as a time of self-discovery so that you don't get burnt out or frustrated by the process. For me, it was trial and error. It was knowing what I didn't like (ie lots of repitition, sit down jobs, etc.) and avoiding those scenarios like the plague.

userguide
07-29-17, 08:10 PM
There is no job I'd permanently like for ever.

For me it's like a car - sooner or later it's going to be costly, outdated and you will want to change or get rid of it.

You should concentrate on your skills instead.

If you know your strong and weak points, best jobs will have it easier to find you

InvitroCanibal
07-30-17, 01:20 AM
Just keep track of the things that you enjoy, and figure out why you enjoy them. Look for overlaps in interest.

sarahsweets
07-30-17, 05:05 AM
How old are you?

Lothloriensgate
07-31-17, 11:40 AM
How old are you?


I'm 47, going on 25, which is good AND bad.

Thanks everyone, so far, I am a little encouraged already. I wonder if it is possible to find a good ADD coach, just one thought that occurred to me.

For us "older" ADDrs we've already dug a pretty deep whole in a number of ways, so it's a challenge not to be negative about "the whole thing."

Lothloriensgate
07-31-17, 11:49 AM
I worked with an ADD coach and learned to identify what I needed to be satisfied in a job. This is very important to ADDers. Identifying needs helps to steer you in a direction that will lead to your satisfaction and overall happiness.

Use this time as an opportunity to experiment and try new things. View it as a time of self-discovery so that you don't get burnt out or frustrated by the process. For me, it was trial and error. It was knowing what I didn't like (ie lots of repitition, sit down jobs, etc.) and avoiding those scenarios like the plague.


Did you think your ADD coach was good? I mean, some say it's hard to find a good coach. Then my psychiatrist told me all ADD coaches have ADD, which might be problematic.

I think I need to hire someone to follow me behind with .... what are those things you hit race horses with to make them go??

Little Missy
07-31-17, 12:46 PM
Did you think your ADD coach was good? I mean, some say it's hard to find a good coach. Then my psychiatrist told me all ADD coaches have ADD, which might be problematic.

I think I need to hire someone to follow me behind with .... what are those things you hit race horses with to make them go??

A riding crop or a lunge whip. :eek:

userguide
07-31-17, 04:10 PM
Nice business idea. ADHD whips. Multipurpose. :LOL:

@anonymous:
What school your coach represented ? Or he didn't have any label ?

anonymouslyadd
07-31-17, 11:26 PM
Did you think your ADD coach was good? I mean, some say it's hard to find a good coach. Then my psychiatrist told me all ADD coaches have ADD, which might be problematic.

I think I need to hire someone to follow me behind with .... what are those things you hit race horses with to make them go??
She had ADD and was amazing. She gave me so much more than coaching. There was accountability, which was very important to my growth. I listened to her, because she'd walked in my shoes. She knew the experience of having ADD.

Lothloriensgate
08-08-17, 08:16 PM
She had ADD and was amazing. She gave me so much more than coaching. There was accountability, which was very important to my growth. I listened to her, because she'd walked in my shoes. She knew the experience of having ADD.

I can understand your reasoning but another part of me doubts that person with ADD to get you organized, which is sort of a reverse bias or whatever you want to call it.

I wonder how many ADD people like their jobs? Certainly it's much less than "normals"

I guess I better look for an ADD coach then. It can't hurt- except my pocket book. How much did you pay? Are you still seeing them? How many hours did you put into it?

Lothloriensgate
08-08-17, 08:21 PM
I worked with an ADD coach and learned to identify what I needed to be satisfied in a job. This is very important to ADDers. Identifying needs helps to steer you in a direction that will lead to your satisfaction and overall happiness.

Use this time as an opportunity to experiment and try new things. View it as a time of self-discovery so that you don't get burnt out or frustrated by the process. For me, it was trial and error. It was knowing what I didn't like (ie lots of repitition, sit down jobs, etc.) and avoiding those scenarios like the plague.

How did you find your ADD coach?? Just hit and miss? Or was there a vetting process of some kind?

Worriedoldie
10-04-17, 10:50 AM
I can understand your reasoning but another part of me doubts that person with ADD to get you organized, which is sort of a reverse bias or whatever you want to call it.

I wonder how many ADD people like their jobs? Certainly it's much less than "normals"

I guess I better look for an ADD coach then. It can't hurt- except my pocket book. How much did you pay? Are you still seeing them? How many hours did you put into it?

I'm not diagnosed yet, but am in the process of being diagnosed for ADD / bipolar.

One of my biggest issues in my life is that almost always I have chosen to do things because others seemed to like doing it... I chose architecture school because a girl I was semi in love with was going there, then failed it.
Then I chose photography school, because I met an old friend who had been doing war photography and that sounded really cool, so I enrolled in photography school and somehow managed to get an apprenticeship for 4 years, earning me a masters in commercial photography....

But honestly........ I regret every day that I chose this path :( but now I can't change it because of kids and economic dire times... I tend to do poor economic choices.

The last job I remember liking was back when I was 17 and worked as a filler in a supermarket. Mostly because it was with friends and times were less hard because I was still living at home.

But even knowing this, I don't have a clue what to do apart from photography. I literally dont know what I want in life... well, apart from making movies, but that won't pay my bills :(

I'm amazed how I at 38 years old still haven't found out who I am or what I want and its a burden for me.

So yeah, I don't know if you feel the exact same way, but I know where you are coming from.