View Full Version : Can controlled self-injury be helpful ?


userguide
08-03-17, 06:07 AM
I have never thought of it as anything useful, but actually some cultures practice some kind of painful rituals/techniques. So maybe it can have a therapeutic use, when handled with care and medical knowledge ?

What kind of stimulation does self-injury give ? Does it last for days ? Does it help with adhd or depression or bp or what exactly ?

Fuzzy12
08-03-17, 06:24 AM
I used to self injure many years ago before I ever suspected I had any mental health problems. :rolleyes:

It was a tool that I used for do many different things: to snap me out of depression or to underline (or increase) my motivation to do something (like study). The only problem was it didn't work. It is stimulating and it dI'd give me a kick I think (doesn't injury increase endorphins??) But the stimulation never lasted long. Mostly by the time I'd finished cleaning up and attending to the cut I'd feel like **** again.

So yeah, I wouldn't recommend it. :-)

I think it has got no place in therapy. Therapy (unlike many cultures or religions) should aim to teach you self respect, self esteem and self preservation. Self injury is the opposite of that (even though for me the aim ultimately was self preservation).

sarahsweets
08-06-17, 07:58 AM
I have never thought of it as anything useful, but actually some cultures practice some kind of painful rituals/techniques. So maybe it can have a therapeutic use, when handled with care and medical knowledge ?

What kind of stimulation does self-injury give ? Does it last for days ? Does it help with adhd or depression or bp or what exactly ?

IMO rituals that are painful but based on a religion, nation, tribe or other spiritual-like beliefs are completely different than self injury. I dont even think they are in the same ball park. Most often, self injury is a result of trauma- childhood or otherwise, PTSD, or an unheathly coping mechanism and way of grounding the person doing the injury. I am trying not to get all fired up over the comparison between the two.

midnightstar
08-06-17, 08:06 AM
My experience is at first you can control self injury but it all too soon gets out of control so I can't advise anyone start it.

userguide
08-06-17, 11:06 PM
OK, so we know skin cut is not the best idea. Harmful and short-lived and the stimulation is counteractive for add.

What about accupunture ? If they know how to put a needle into the body and supposedly relieve pain,
maybe that's a way to get an adrenaline stimulation ?

Also, cold therapy. Put an ice cube on your body and you are more alert. With no harm.

I mean if pain is a stimulation with side effects, lets get rid of the side effects.

aeon
08-06-17, 11:48 PM
In the short-term, yes.

In the long-term, no, such that is a net loss in the end.

That's my experience, anyway.


Cheers,
Ian

someothertime
08-07-17, 03:03 AM
Two things come to mind;

-controlled multiple bee-stings ( what's in the stings matters too ) i'm sure the pain / hormonal kick is a big part too.... same goes for some chinese medicines.... acupuncture / deep massage.....

-I once chatted with a lady who suffered from chronic pain. She said that self administered "bodily stress" was the best regular "healthy" treatment she had found.

Avoiding the whole "WHO, HOW" part of the argument..... it's an interesting area of study..... One could ask it in the opposite angle too....;

"How does a lack of physical bodily pain - such as that experienced in modern society over the longer term - effect arousal effect human well being, especially with relation to body chemistry."

I'm sure there are some good studies on this..... love to see some anecdotal outcomes here.