View Full Version : Accomodatiions for Dyslexia/ADHD?


Caco3girl
08-23-17, 11:04 AM
Had the third grade meet and greet last night. Was told privately that the average lexile reading score for a third grader is mid 600's to early 800's. My daughter received a 69, and they would like a meeting.

Okay so here it comes, battle for my second kids IEP. My son has one due to ADHD, although it's listed as Otherwise Health Impaired. the problem is I think it's more than that with her. My family has a history of Dyslexia, and while she isn't presenting like me, she is presenting like my mother....who has the more severe version.

What can they do for Dyslexia? I wasn't diagnosed until college and they didn't do jack for someone back in the 60's like my mom. The teachers went on and on about things 3rd grade would do this year and while verbally I believe my daughter could keep up, on paper...um...no.

maple17
08-23-17, 06:19 PM
No advice, just following. My non-ADHD/ASD child is being evaluated next month for dyslexia or some kind of processing issue. He's doing maths three years above his grade level, just got a distinction (top 8% nationally) in the country-wide UNSW assessment for science, but he loathes writing more than a few words and his letters are often reversed. His reading seems okay, it's writing that is tough for him. So, we might be looking to institute accomodations for him as well.

There's a family history (husband's side) of dyslexia, dysgraphia and other learning issues, but as you mention, no one did anything for them back in the 70s, and even worse for them in rural Ireland, they were just labelled "slow," and no effort was made on their behalf. It makes me sad when I think about it.

sarahsweets
08-24-17, 04:38 AM
The OHI classification seems like its not a good indication of what the issue is with some kids but imo its a good one because it doesnt always keep you in a narrow bracket of a diagnosis and it opens more doors up to treatment. Here in NJ the OHI covers things like adhd, dyslexia, dysgraphia, dyscalciula(sp) etc. The reason for this here, is those things on their own do not qualify a kid for special education services. As stand alone issues at most a kid can get a 504 here but being classified OHI means that in addition to adhd or dyslexia, there are other issues that need services. My son and daughter both had more going on then their adhd and those were included in their IEP's but alone the issues wouldnt haven entitled them for services. Does your child have an IEP?

Caco3girl
08-24-17, 10:09 AM
My 3rd grader doesn't have an IEP yet. They had her on an EIP, and already had her on Tier 3. In GA Dyslexia qualifies you for an IEP, it is a specific learning disability so it's an automatic in. Anyway, last year she was pulled out of class for 2 hours of small group intense reading, but this year she is only eligible for 30 minutes. That is not enough in my opinion, but unless I get her an IEP I think that is all they will give her.

I just don't know what to ask for for her. They have to know there is a severe problem by now. I know I didn't really understand reading until 5th or 6th grade, so her delay was expected, but she is able to read some things now, so I have hope. The MAJOR problem is in GA kids have to pass a test in 3rd, 5th, and 8th grade. If they don't pass the reading AND math part of this test they are NOT allowed to move on to the next grade. As long as she is main stream she is a part of this rule.

sarahsweets
08-25-17, 04:48 AM
My son has dysgraphia and received OT and PT until 10th grade for handwriting issues, I suspect he may have had dyslexic-like issues but not something like fullblown dyslexia. at least he didnt meet the criteria for it then.

Fredrica
08-29-17, 07:06 PM
It must be fearful to receive information that your child is struggling in reading and may have some type of reading disability. Parents want their children to be successful. I am concerned that you have framed the IEP process as a “battle”. I am a special educator in California and know that the IEP process can be long, often frustrating, and very tedious. On the other hand, it can be an effective process, when the school and parents work together in the best interest of educating the student.

In California, Dyslexia is not a qualifying eligibility for special education, however, some students with “dyslexia” meet one of the 13 eligibility criteria, such as “learning disability”, that qualifies them for support. If eligibility is established or more information is known about your daughter’s learning needs, an education plan to meet her needs can be developed. Have you met with schools SST team or considered an evaluation

Caco3girl
08-30-17, 10:30 AM
It must be fearful to receive information that your child is struggling in reading and may have some type of reading disability. Parents want their children to be successful. I am concerned that you have framed the IEP process as a “battle”. I am a special educator in California and know that the IEP process can be long, often frustrating, and very tedious. On the other hand, it can be an effective process, when the school and parents work together in the best interest of educating the student.

In California, Dyslexia is not a qualifying eligibility for special education, however, some students with “dyslexia” meet one of the 13 eligibility criteria, such as “learning disability”, that qualifies them for support. If eligibility is established or more information is known about your daughter’s learning needs, an education plan to meet her needs can be developed. Have you met with schools SST team or considered an evaluation

For my sons IEP, ADHD that was classified as otherwise health impaired, it was absolutely a battle. I started my concerns in 5th grade with him but I got pushed and placated. Oh some kids just have a verbal and non-verbal score that are VERY far apart, it's normal. Oh, he's only in trouble if he's under 15% reading comprehension and he's at 19% so he doesn't qualify. Every test they gave him he was 2-6 points above the problem level so he didn't qualify for anything and they wouldn't do anything. I;m not sure how a 15% is "severely disabled" and a 19% is average, but that is what it is here.

Every time I requested a meeting I got one but nothing was done. In 8th grade I spoke to another mom at a baseball game and she told me the secret, you have to ask for a formal evaluation, until those words come out of your mouth they don't HAVE to do anything but placate you by doing busy work and having your son jump through hoops. So I asked, and all the same results came back, just barely above the "problem" threshold so he doesn't qualify for anything, but hey we can try a behavioral sheet, and a check in person and mandatory tutoring....etc...meanwhile my son is getting more depressed by the day and telling his teachers he is "too stupid for school". It was a battle, an October of 8th grade to January of 9th grade battle that almost resulted in him repeating 8th grade while they tried all their "processes".

I'm not going down that road with my daughter. I will speak the magic words in our meeting set for next week. "I want her formally evaluated"...then they have their time frame to get that testing done and we can go from there. Since a 3rd grade Lexile reading score is suppose to be well over 600 and she is at a 69 I'm guessing they may be more cooperative than when I did this with my son.