View Full Version : Addressing and treating adult emotional state, first.


mildadhd
08-24-17, 06:06 PM
The adult should be aware of her emotional state when setting out to take medications for AD(H)D.

Not infrequently, the AD(H)D adult may be suffering from chronic low-grade depression or anxiety. If this is the case, the psychostimulants may not help, or in some cases may make matters worse. If depression or anxiety is present, it needs to be addressed first, or at least at the same time.

-Gabor Mate, "Scattered", Chapter: "What Medications Can And Cannot Do", p 314.


I've been treating my adult AD(H)D, with methyphenidate for about 12 years.

But I have never tried treating my adult AD(H)D, by addressing and treating my emotional state first.

This week I have decided to stop taking methyphenidate, and try treating my emotional state, first, with my Doctors' guidance.


(I may take the same medication or other types of medication again in the future. This is not a anti medication thread. I am just trying a different adult AD(H)D treatment approach, which may or may not include taking medication in the future).


Feelings appreciated.





M

Fuzzy12
08-24-17, 06:22 PM
I took antidepressants and mood stabilisers first before I was diagnosed with adhd. Maybe it is just me but the only thing that finally got my depression under control (and eventually rid of it) was stimulants.

mildadhd
08-24-17, 06:46 PM
I took antidepressants and mood stabilisers first before I was diagnosed with adhd. Maybe it is just me but the only thing that finally got my depression under control (and eventually rid of it) was stimulants.



I am adopted, and I think my AD(H)D is first a bottom up morbidity of early anxiety and early depression.

It is also possible I experience top down morbidities like anxiety and depression due to living with AD(H)D.

I think I experience both bottom up early anxiety and early depression and top down anxiety and depression.

Methylphenidate does help temporarily relieve my top down morbidities.



M

ToneTone
08-25-17, 01:13 AM
I always encourage people to treat them concurrently.

Antidepressants don't interfere with ADHD meds, so why stop taking ADHD meds? ... Just add antidepressant or therapy or both. It would be different if treating ADHD interfered with treating depression. I know of no such claim.

We are full human beings ... a full range of our issues have to be addressed and yes, addressed at the same time usually. We have to wear glasses and take ADHD medications ... and take allergy meds ... and go to the dentist and eat healthy ... and on and on ..

I attended to my depression for years ... with therapy and meds ... But my life didn't really break out of the rut until I added ADHD meds ...

Also untreated ADHD, as people often say on this board, is probably implicated in depression (along with our brain biology). Without question untreated ADHD makes life really hard and exhausting and frustrating.

Anyway, good luck. Hope you have a really smart provider who knows what they are doing.

Tone

sarahsweets
08-25-17, 05:04 AM
I had to treat the bipolar first because it became a life or death matter but treating both at the same time works best for me now.

Unmanagable
08-25-17, 09:28 AM
From someone who no longer takes medications due to the side effects greatly outweighing the benefits, it helps me tremendously to be able to consciously recognize and redirect my thoughts before they turn into emotional tsunamis.

I don't always succeed, but the meds didn't always work at 100%, either, so I see it as six of one thing, half a dozen of the other, based solely on my personal experiences. I think it's great you have a doctor who is open and willing to try various methods.

Managing my emotions requires that I practice various methods each and every day, like purposeful breathing, fun daily movement (play) most call exercise, getting in touch with nature in some way, uplifting and encouraging self-talk vs. the usual a** kicking default setting learned from many abusive years gone by, getting a good nights sleep, choosing to consume only the things that my body can healthily recognize and process, avoiding, as much as humanly possible, all the things that I know for sure can take and break me down, and not kicking my own a** relentlessly when I do fall down, as I had grown quite used to doing.

I never really felt a whole lot of support in regards to emotions and such when I was regularly visiting any of the doctors/psychiatrists/therapists/etc. that I was directed to via my insurance providers at the time.

I guess their very limited 15 minute time slots per patient didn't leave much time for actually discussing and thoroughly processing anything.

Trying to process feelings that were mostly a result of a bad chemical reaction to meds became quite tricky in trying to make sense of it all with various therapists who didn't thoroughly understand the medications themselves, to say the least, not to mention it being rather detrimental to my overall well being.

Looking forward to hearing how it goes. Take good care.

eclectic beagle
08-26-17, 04:27 PM
Yeah. Seems that there would be patterns of thinking built over years that would have to be addressed before meds reach the desired level of effectiveness.

mildadhd
08-26-17, 07:56 PM
Yeah. Seems that there would be patterns of thinking built over years that would have to be addressed before meds reach the desired level of effectiveness.

Thanks

There would be patterns of implicit feelings built over the early years, that higher "thinking" brain functions would be shaped and built upon.

Before birth and the age of 4 is when we become most impaired/stuck.




M

mildadhd
08-26-17, 08:00 PM
From someone who no longer takes medications due to the side effects greatly outweighing the benefits, it helps me tremendously to be able to consciously recognize and redirect my thoughts before they turn into emotional tsunamis.

I don't always succeed, but the meds didn't always work at 100%, either, so I see it as six of one thing, half a dozen of the other, based solely on my personal experiences. I think it's great you have a doctor who is open and willing to try various methods.

Managing my emotions requires that I practice various methods each and every day, like purposeful breathing, fun daily movement (play) most call exercise, getting in touch with nature in some way, uplifting and encouraging self-talk vs. the usual a** kicking default setting learned from many abusive years gone by, getting a good nights sleep, choosing to consume only the things that my body can healthily recognize and process, avoiding, as much as humanly possible, all the things that I know for sure can take and break me down, and not kicking my own a** relentlessly when I do fall down, as I had grown quite used to doing.

I never really felt a whole lot of support in regards to emotions and such when I was regularly visiting any of the doctors/psychiatrists/therapists/etc. that I was directed to via my insurance providers at the time.

I guess their very limited 15 minute time slots per patient didn't leave much time for actually discussing and thoroughly processing anything.

Trying to process feelings that were mostly a result of a bad chemical reaction to meds became quite tricky in trying to make sense of it all with various therapists who didn't thoroughly understand the medications themselves, to say the least, not to mention it being rather detrimental to my overall well being.

Looking forward to hearing how it goes. Take good care.

Thanks

Your insight has already helped remind me of the many options.



M

mildadhd
08-26-17, 08:05 PM
I had to treat the bipolar first because it became a life or death matter but treating both at the same time works best for me now.

Thanks

I have tried anxiety/depression medication with methylphenidate, in the past.




M

mildadhd
08-26-17, 08:07 PM
I always encourage people to treat them concurrently.

Antidepressants don't interfere with ADHD meds, so why stop taking ADHD meds? ... Just add antidepressant or therapy or both. It would be different if treating ADHD interfered with treating depression. I know of no such claim.

We are full human beings ... a full range of our issues have to be addressed and yes, addressed at the same time usually. We have to wear glasses and take ADHD medications ... and take allergy meds ... and go to the dentist and eat healthy ... and on and on ..

I attended to my depression for years ... with therapy and meds ... But my life didn't really break out of the rut until I added ADHD meds ...

Also untreated ADHD, as people often say on this board, is probably implicated in depression (along with our brain biology). Without question untreated ADHD makes life really hard and exhausting and frustrating.

Anyway, good luck. Hope you have a really smart provider who knows what they are doing.

Tone

Thanks for your interest in the discussion.

I've read that some children only take medication when in school. (Not during summer break, etc)

I have permission from my doctor to take medication when I need it.

I have discussed about implicit preverbal brain development with my doctor.

When I got diagnosed, I was told by a different doctor I will probably have to take medication holidays.

I appreciate your concern, but I am not sure why you are so concerned in this situation?







M

ToneTone
08-26-17, 09:58 PM
Concern over co-morbidity.

mildadhd
08-26-17, 11:32 PM
Concern over co-morbidity.

I am concerned about my AD(H)D being a bottom up morbidity of separation anxiety/separation depression.

I've tried medication for anxiety and depression with methylphenidate.

But that did not help my bottom up subterranean anxiety and depression.

The medication did help with top down morbidities, but not the separation anxiety I have had since before I had AD(H)D.

I've never actually looked up what doctors prescribe for separation anxiety?

I am going to try some non pharmaceutical treatment options first.








M

ToneTone
08-27-17, 04:52 PM
That's great to hear that you're really wanting to take on that separation anxiety. I think I missed that in my earlier responses.

So you are looking for a provider who specializes in the bottom-up approach?

Tone

mildadhd
08-28-17, 08:51 PM
That's great to hear that you're really wanting to take on that separation anxiety. I think I missed that in my earlier responses.

So you are looking for a provider who specializes in the bottom-up approach?

Tone

I have been having success considering unconditional self parenting instinctual PLAY therapy bottom up treatment approach, with a long term perspective in mind, similar to how Unmanageable described.





M