View Full Version : adhd and social security benifit


strummy
08-31-03, 06:39 PM
I am in search of info on how to obtain social security benifits for my two sons. Does anyone have info on this or know how to go about doing it? Another parent at their school mentioned that she has been getting it for her so since he was put on medication. Has anyone else heard of this?

Tara
08-31-03, 08:01 PM
This is just "hear say" but I have heard that it can be very hard to get SSI for AD/HD. I have also heard that people are more likely to qualify for SSI if the person has a dual diagnosis. But, like I said it's "hear say" and I'm not quite sure of the laws.

CHADD http://www.chadd.org may be able to help you.

You could also try the site http://www.addcopingskills.com and click on the "Get in Touch" link. The person who runs the site is an attorney who has AD/HD himself and is very active in the AD/HD communuty.

Andrew
08-31-03, 08:37 PM
I have actually heard the same thing, Tara

strummy
09-01-03, 08:52 AM
Thanks so much for the info guys! I got lost in both sites! There is just so much great info. Boy I wish I had known about these sites sooner. Thanks for everything. This info and this site will help to make our family life that much easier. Now if I could just find someone in my area! LOL

gladawoods
02-23-06, 12:34 PM
My son is ADHD combined tpye, ODD, and conduct disorder. And medicated.I went to social security with all the info and after the schools sending paperwork and his dr too. We will start recieving benefits within a couple of weeks for him.

QueensU_girl
03-03-06, 08:32 PM
N.B. I am not a lawyer.

Much like insurance companies, various Gov't programs that offer cash benefits will 'deny deny deny' all applications the FIRST time. (Seen John Grisham's THE RAINMAKER?)

Obviously this is CRUSHING for those who really really need help.

But take heart in knowing that it happens to Everyone.

The trick is: (a) patient persistence, and (b) amassing documentation of how the disability impacts all areas of life (eg school, work, earning power, social effects, concentration -- all the functional things in one's day to day Life).

If this is your case, a lawyer's letter threatening legal action in a disability application will often get a recipient approved for benefits.

This happened with my mom's disability case here in Canada.

I have seen it happen again and again with clients, patients, neighbours, friends of friends.

Ofcourse, getting yer $500 or $700/month isn't a lot of money, but if you can't work, it's the world. It means the difference between living indoors or on the pavement.

Often colleges/universities with Law School's will have student Legal Aid offices. If you can't afford a lawyer [and who can?], you could start there for advice.

Best of Luck,
Emma

QueensU_girl
03-03-06, 08:56 PM
[QUOTE=Tara]This is just "hear say" but I have heard that it can be very hard to get SSI for AD/HD. I have also heard that people are more likely to qualify for SSI if the person has a dual diagnosis.


Yup. The medical thinking is that the MORE co-exising Diagnoses that a person has, the more disabled they are. :S

Same as if a person had cancer, HIV, MS, paralysed at C4, and a brain injury -- they would be seen as being more impaired [translation: hopeless] than the person with Inattentive ADD.

The more GLOBAL the impairment (the -=greater=- # of areas affected, and the more profoundly impaired they are (eg social, occupational, school, family, physical, cognitive, emotional, behavioural) -- the more hopeless the person is seen as being for functioning well in the future.

The more co-morbidities [co-existing illnesses], the more negative the outlook for that person's future.

Emma

Bloomingfield
08-12-07, 01:43 PM
I would also suggest contacting the non-profit Legal Services or Legal Aid organization in your area (if any) and see if they will be able to assist you with your application. If you fit their income guidelines (be under a certain percentage of poverty) and they have the person power to help you, these offices often are able to assist with the process and provide helpful advice free of charge. If you are over the income guidlines, they might be able to suggest other places to look for help.

QueensU_girl
08-12-07, 01:54 PM
ADHD can act like a Frontal Lobe Syndrome. You might be able to proceed on those grounds.

The trouble is: you are going to need a lot of TESTING documentation.

This can be hard to get if you cannot afford to pay for TESTING from a NEUROpsychologist. (PhD Brain impairment tester.)

[Often the insurance will not cover a neuropsychologist. If you are needing to apply for Disability for your kids, i'd imagine you don't have thousands of dollars for Testing.]

Neurologists (MDs) don't do much 'brain performance testing' other than EEGs and fMRIs or CTs or PETs. They are moreso looking for evidence of stroke, head injuries, tumours, seizures, anoxia, or aneurysms. Often insurance will cover the Neurologist.


The EEG just measures surface brain activity.


Imaging like fMRI/CT/PET will not always pick up problems, unless they are also anatomically correlated to symptom/loss of function for that area seen on the results.

Maybe you can get school records or school testing records to help bolster your application?

ElegantZombie
02-14-10, 03:01 AM
I was diagnosed with adult ADD several years ago when I was in therapy for severe clinical depression. My doctor told me that from my history, I had always had ADD just as I had suffered from clinical depression since childhood, and the two illnesses fed on each other. I've learned a lot of coping tools through years of therapy, and have found a combination of meds that keep the depression fairly managable, but my ADD seems to be more of a problem the older I get. Sometimes its under control, but a lot of the time it isn't. I'm presently unemployed and have no medical insurance, but my psychiatrist (who manages my meds) strongly urged me to get back into therapy and gave me contact information to find a therapist through social services because she believes (as I do) that my depression has progressed into bipolar disorder because I now sometimes have manic episodes.

This leads to my issues with the social security administration. I have applied for benefits twice and was turned down both times. I'm 52, but for the last few years I've worked in several jobs that were very physically demanding, and I can outwork most guys ten years younger than myself. I also have a college degree, and several degrees from technical schools. I have a list of skills a mile long, but the longest I've ever worked at one place was almost five years before I quit, or in most cases, was fired for being late too often. My normal pattern is to be an outstanding employee for around a year, and then I start to hate my job. That's when I start slacking and develop a habit of coming late or calling in sick too often. I'm sure most people with ADD can relate to this.

Anyhow, after being denied social security benefits for the second time, I called one of those law firms who specialize in helping you get benefits, and was told that if I'm able to work, I don't stand much of a chance of getting any disability benefits. I explained that although I'm able to work (as defined by certain guidelines), I have an illness that basically makes me incapable of keeping a job for any length of time. What they told me was that being unable to keep a job isn't a disability, or in other words, "tough luck". I've been trying to get a decent job for the past year, but my work history sends up a "red flag" to prospective employers.

By no means am I soliciting sympathy or pity, but I'm three months late on my child support and the state suspended my driver's license until I am fully caught up on payments and interest, and I'm about two weeks away from living in my van because I had to spend my rent money on meds & Dr bills. I have diabetes, and can't afford the meds anymore, but I keep it under control by watching my weight and diet. I'm not complaining here, because there are many people who have it much worse than I do, but all these things happening at once has me extremely stressed out and it is beginning to affect my mental and physical health.

I'm going to social services this week and see if one of their shrinks can assist me in qualifying for disability benefits.

If anyone has experience or resources in dealing with this issue, I would greatly appreciate it if you could post it here. Thanks in advance. :)

Retromancer
02-14-10, 04:29 AM
I'm afraid that even if you had an open and shut case it still wouldn't help you now. Applying and being approved is a drawn out process. Expect to be turned down at least once. Be all means start a claim but find any means to subsist in the meantime. Does Virginia have a disability benefit?

Being able to hold a job is factored in the determination process. Unfortunately if you present your case as you did in your post, I'm afraid it will work against you. You are probably best off emphasizing your inability to work now.

An obvious question but I need to ask: Are you receiving food stamps? If not apply now. Not only will you not be using your scarce money to buy food but it will enable you to be eligible for other programs.

kibbled_bits
02-21-10, 06:33 PM
Perhaps I've never met someone with ADHD disabling enough where they couldn't work. Have they already tried medicine and all treatments and are still unable to work? People with ADHD are often very good in some careers and terrible at others.

For me knowing I had ADHD was liberating and the treatment itself was liberating. A diagnosis of ADHD shouldn't be a career death sentence or be a cause for not being able to work at some capacity.

Retromancer
02-22-10, 02:32 AM
Of course this assumes that the jobs are indeed out there.

Millions of Unemployed Face Years Without Jobs | NY Times
(http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/21/business/economy/21unemployed.html)

Perhaps I've never met someone with ADHD disabling enough where they couldn't work. Have they already tried medicine and all treatments and are still unable to work? People with ADHD are often very good in some careers and terrible at others.

For me knowing I had ADHD was liberating and the treatment itself was liberating. A diagnosis of ADHD shouldn't be a career death sentence or be a cause for not being able to work at some capacity.